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Thread: Using TXP 320

  1. #1
    Steven Ruttenberg's Avatar
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    Using TXP 320

    I have 3 developers to choose from Tmax, Pyrocat and HC110.

    Which do you prefer?

    What EI do you use with chosen developer?

    What development time/temp/dilution for chosen developer?

    I currently use Tmax for Tmax100, Using EI64 and 1:9 dilution at 8:30 to 9:00 at 68 deg F.

    First time trying this film. I most likely will end up using it for astrophotography at some point once I figure this film out.

  2. #2

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    Re: Using TXP 320

    TXP320 was my choice in sheet film from 1981-2010. So I have some experience with it... I used HC-110 'B' in trays for some years in the 1980s but the development times were very short. Went to staining developers (first PMK, now Pyrocat) in about 1993 and never looked back.

    So I'll suggest that you rate TXP at EI 160. Develop in Pyrocat 1:1:100. Development time is up to you- process method, agitation, and your own contrast preferences will determine that. But start with 10 minutes @ 68F. Best of luck!

  3. #3

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    Re: Using TXP 320

    I've been using Tri-X 320 in its many guises for more than 30 years. I like the latest incarnation a lot; finer grain but still a similar characteristic curve (long toe, good midtone separation...). I've used HC-110, D-76 and, for the last 10 or so years, PMK. I wouldn't hesitate to use Pyrocat. I got good negatives with the more conventional developers too, just missing edge effects and the grain masking in the clouds, etc. that I like so much with a staining developer.

    I rate the new 320TXP at 250, just a bit slower than box speed. That said, when I want to emphasize shadow separation, I'll give a extra 2/3-stoop or so to move the shadows up on to the straight-line portion of the curve. Base your exposure on how you want your shadows to look. The long toe of this film lets you retain a lot of detail in the shadows, but without a lot of separation at the low end. These you can "dig" for during printing sometimes by over-dodging and then burning back with a high-contrast filter, or split-grade printing, giving a high-contrast base exposure and then burning the rest of the print in with a lower-contrast setting while dodging the shadows. Lots of possibilities...

    My time for the older version of TXP with HC-110 was 11 minutes using a 1+63 dilution (I found times with dil. B way too short). If you use this dilution, be sure to use enough volume so that you have enough stock for the number of sheets you're developing. I used 600ml for 4-5 4x5 sheets.

    Of course, you'll have to test for your own times with whatever developer you use.

    Best,

    Doremus

  4. #4
    DG 3313's Avatar
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    Re: Using TXP 320

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	198020

    4x5 TXP 320 expired in 1978, rated at ISO 80 and developed in D-76 1:1 (in a rotary tube) for 13 minutes Fresh chemistry was at 68 deg. I made this negative in October of this year.

  5. #5
    Steven Ruttenberg's Avatar
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    Re: Using TXP 320

    Nice image. Well, looks like I gotta make a swag based on the above. Till I get settled in my new place (building a dark room ). I'll not be doing much testing, at least till I get settled in our temporary digs.

    How would a comparison to Tmax100 be?

  6. #6

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    Re: Using TXP 320

    Apples vs. oranges on speed, grain, and resolution alone. TXP is an old-school fast film, and TMX is the first of the tabular super-fine grain films. Whether you prefer the 'look' (curve shape) of one film over the other, well, that's down to taste. It's a big (and loaded) question and I'll let other people tackle it...

  7. #7
    Steven Ruttenberg's Avatar
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    Re: Using TXP 320

    My main reason for it is the sensitivity it has in the blue region of light which is beneficial for astrophotography. It's a shame I can't get a film that is sensitive to red around 1100nm. Seems the best one can do is around 700nm which is okay, but not ideal. Guess, I have to leave that up to the digital camera.

  8. #8

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    Re: Using TXP 320

    Tri-X 320 has been my primary film for 40 years. Based on sensitometric testing, I've always rated it at 320. For the first 15 years when I tray developed using the shuffle method, I developed for 5 1/2 mins at 68F in HC-110(B). For about the last 25 years since getting a Jobo, I develop for 7 mins at 68F in HC-110(H) in Expert Drums. I may have dabbled briefly with D-76 1:1, but always returned to HC-110. IMO, Tri-X 320 (or 400) in HC-110 is a wonderful combination.

    I know a lot of photographers who use and love TMax films, but I just never warmed up to 'em. I like the 400 speed film better than the 100, but have stuck with good 'ole Tri-X; I simply prefer its rendering of tones.

  9. #9
    Steven Ruttenberg's Avatar
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    Re: Using TXP 320

    I will hopefully get to use it here shortly on my next trip up north this week to Utah. At least that is the plan.

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