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Thread: 8x10 film processing

  1. #21

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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Quote Originally Posted by interneg View Post
    A Jobo is usually going to be more consistent both in agitation and temperature control in most normal circumstances.
    I've chem and air room temperature at 20C, so total consistence.

    In most cases it's irrelevant having a little shift in the development degree, 20s more or less equivalent development is irrelevant, you adjust paper grade later.

    What I obtain with reduced agitation, when I use it, is relatively less dense highlights compared with the mids. There are situations where you want that, night photography for example.

    I night photography film sensitometric curve is deformated by the higher LIRF in the shadows and mids, while highlights don't have LIRF, in that situation you want to slow development in the highlights by not removing free bromide from the emulsion, so you obtain easier to print highlights that have been developed with a locally higher restrainer concentration.



    Quote Originally Posted by interneg View Post
    As for all the fluff about semi-stand etc, it's a half-assed, inconsistent non-solution for people who apparently want to waste the time they could use more usefully learning how to unsharp mask instead - which will always have a greater impact on apparent sharpness.
    What is a waste of time is having to make masks because we have not crafted the right printable negative. No doubt that USM masking adds acutance, and that masking is powerful, but if we make a negative that's easily printable like we want then we have an advantage.

    I guess that we have two different ways, one is making a bullet proof linear negative that has flexibility for intensive image manipulations in the printing. The other way is crafting a negative that prints easy like we want, at the possible cost of less flexibility, because the compressions we make in the toe/shoulder have no way back.

    No way is better than the other, it's just a personal choice, each way requires different skills, IMHO.
    Last edited by Pere Casals; 28-Nov-2019 at 07:24.

  2. #22

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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Thanks to all for your comprehensive responses. I never tried tray development but it will really be a test of how dark my darkroom really is. Great idea with using a paper safe box. Ill give it a shot, I have 11x14 trays nice and clean, should be good to go.

    I was initially leaning towards drums only because of the ability to swap chemistry in daylight. There are some negative spirals custom made both for Jobo and for Paterson tanks. On a related note, why are Jobo tanks so expensive? Not the automatic processor, just a plastic cylindrical tank 500$?


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  3. #23

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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Quote Originally Posted by radu_c View Post
    On a related note, why are Jobo tanks so expensive? Not the automatic processor, just a plastic cylindrical tank 500$?
    The holes in the Expert drums are not cylinders ! This allows the chem to reach the sheet back and to remove the anti halation layer. It has to be a quite expensive mold, and with the low production this ends in those prices. Sure that it can be made way cheaper if a high production was there.

    The expert drum is a very good system, who wants it... he has to pay...

    But don't worry, with trays (Paper Safe) you have a top notch system that's even better from certain points of view. You may work with 3 paper safes in parallel, you can set a different time for each paper safe (N+/-) and when you have the sheets in the stop tray you may start the following batch, so it's even more productive !

    Also the Expert is good for Foma, Shangai, etc Those films with old technology emulsions are scratched with even blowing on them, so the least you touch them (when wet) the better, while Kodak/Ilford sheets have no problem in the trays.

  4. #24
    Peter De Smidt's Avatar
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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    The Expert tanks are expensive because they complicated, the tubes inside are bowed to allow solution to get to the back of the negatives, and because only a small number are sold. Consider, though, how much sheet film costs, both monetarily and in the time and effort needed to expose it.
    You often feel tired, not because you've done too much, but because you've done too little of what sparks a light in you.
    ― Alexander Den Heijer, Nothing you don't already know

  5. #25

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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    During the mid 1990's got a Jobo processing system and expert drums. After that all sheet film was processed this way. The results were consistent, uniform and predictable using modest volumes of chemistry. Done tray processing, Nikkor 4x5 tanks, dip-dunk with hangers-tanks and all that, for modest volumes Jobo with expert tanks proved best overall.

    Consistent, reliable, predictable processing of film is often NOT appreciated as this is many times one of the crucial factors and steps in print making. IMO, it is nearly impossible to recover from a poor film image be it from processing errors, processing damage or etc... High quality film processing is paramount to print making excellence. Anything less than the absolutely highest quality film processing is a waste of time, resources, and a LOT more.


    Bernice

  6. #26
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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Anyone tried these...

    https://20thcenturycamera.com

  7. #27

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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Jobo had a variation of these, tricky to load, works sort of OK..

    IMO, trying to economize on sheet film processing is, "penny wise, pound foolish.".

    FAR better off spending the required $ on a good working Jobo processor and jobs expert drums as needed.

    The amount of grief poorly processed film or film damaged during processing, and other problems that can so easily happen during sheet film processing is often not appreciated until one looks back at the amount of time, resources and a LOT more wasted trying to deal with processed film problems. This is not to say a Jobo & Expert drums are the only way to achieve film processing excellence, it is one of the long proven ways to achieve this at modest film volumes, modest chemistry required and .... Zero wrong with dip-dunk, racks and all with nitrogen burst, Refema processor and ... these tend to be higher volume processing systems that might not fit the needs of a smaller dark room with modest film volumes to be processed.


    Bernice


    Quote Originally Posted by Barry Wilkinson View Post
    Anyone tried these...

    https://20thcenturycamera.com

  8. #28

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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernice Loui View Post
    Jobo had a variation of these, tricky to load, works sort of OK..

    IMO, trying to economize on sheet film processing is, "penny wise, pound foolish.".

    FAR better off spending the required $ on a good working Jobo processor and jobs expert drums as needed.

    The amount of grief poorly processed film or film damaged during processing, and other problems that can so easily happen during sheet film processing is often not appreciated until one looks back at the amount of time, resources and a LOT more wasted trying to deal with processed film problems. This is not to say a Jobo & Expert drums are the only way to achieve film processing excellence, it is one of the long proven ways to achieve this at modest film volumes, modest chemistry required and .... Zero wrong with dip-dunk, racks and all with nitrogen burst, Refema processor and ... these tend to be higher volume processing systems that might not fit the needs of a smaller dark room with modest film volumes to be processed.


    Bernice

    If one has the budget, this is definitely the way to go. Super consistency, less chemistry needed...Mine has seen tons of use, but for some reason I'm kinda jonesing for the Stark processor.
    notch codes ? I only use one film...

  9. #29

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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Quote Originally Posted by Pere Casals View Post
    Developers like PMK tend to generate nasty general stain in rotary, for example.
    I'm going to strongly disagree with this. Sorry, but unless you've ever processed PMK with rotary, this is bad intel
    notch codes ? I only use one film...

  10. #30
    Peter De Smidt's Avatar
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    Re: 8x10 film processing

    Quote Originally Posted by Fred L View Post
    I'm going to strongly disagree with this. Sorry, but unless you've ever processed PMK with rotary, this is bad intel
    Yep. Bad theory + little experience = bad advice.
    You often feel tired, not because you've done too much, but because you've done too little of what sparks a light in you.
    ― Alexander Den Heijer, Nothing you don't already know

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