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Thread: Tripod Holes

  1. #11

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    Re: Tripod Holes

    Quote Originally Posted by Willie View Post
    Your own Reohotographic Survey project. Some others have done this type of work as well.

    Mark Klett is probably the best known with a few books out showing his efforts.

    https://arthistoryunstuffed.com/reph...eing-the-west/
    Well, I guess it can be called "my own rephotographic survey project", although US Forest Service and National Park Service employees asked me to do it, and I would not have done it otherwise. It's a very fun an interesting job, and nice to be paid for it, but it is still a job.

    I am familiar with some of Klett's work. There is a vast literature on repeat photography, going back to 1888 in Europe, and I have read several of these publications, and know some of the practitioners. I have published repeat photography as part of broader scientific works since 1993.

    As I mentioned in the first post, and it should go without saying, others can post their own images here too -- this is not just for me.

  2. #12

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    Re: Tripod Holes

    A third set --

    South Bitch Creek valley from its divide with Moose Basin, northern Teton Range, NW Wyoming

    Click image for larger version. 

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    mid-September 1897. Frank J. Haynes H-3710. Courtesy of Frank J. Haynes Collection, Montana Historical Society. Helena, MT

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    September 13, 2019

    On 4 by 5 Ilford Ortho Plus, with a 90-mm f8 Schneider Kreuznach Super Angulon, 1/34 s at F16. A period of heavy clouds precluded a more exact match to the original's timing. Scanned from a print on Ilford MG IV Deluxe glossy RC paper, #2 1/2 filter.

    A limestone ridge dominates the scene. The small scattered plants in the foreground are mountain parsley. The large meadow in the valley below is Hidden Corral Basin. The camera station was on the Grand Teton National Park - Targhee National Forest boundary, and the scene is within the Jedediah Smith Wilderness. The three riders are easily identifiable on the original photo -- here is a crop from the original (the LFPF allowed resolution does not capture all of the detail on the original).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Richard (Beaver Dick) Leigh is on the left, William Seward Webb is on the right. I have not figured out who the middle person is yet. Webb organized a large hunting expedition to the northern Tetons in 1896 and 1897, supported by the US Army; Webb was married to one of William Vanderbilt's daughters. He hired Frank Haynes to photograph the expedition. Haynes used glass plates in an 8 by 10 camera.

    Haynes is a well-known early photographer. He had the photography concession in Yellowstone National Park for many years, followed by his son Jack E. Haynes. Frank was the official photographer on President Chester Arthur's trip to Yellowstone National Park and nearby areas in 1883.

    The Haynes prints at the Montana Historical Society are the most consistently beautiful, from a tone and resolution perspective at least, and also aesthetically for many, I have seen in any early collection so far.

  3. #13

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    Re: Tripod Holes

    Anyone else have some repeats? I can keep posting, but it would be more fun to have more variety.

  4. #14
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    Re: Tripod Holes

    I visited Arches National Park nearby to Moab, Utah, last year. Skyline Arch apparently had a major change back in the 1940's as you can see from the sign I shot nearby. The second picture was the "live" shot I took while I was there composed for aesthetic interest, not ecological study. But you still can see the big difference from 80 years ago. The new opening is 77' x 33.5'. The rockfall spit out a boulder doubling the original opening.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DSC02557.jpg   DSC02562.jpg  

  5. #15
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    Re: Tripod Holes

    I just noticed that the boulder must have been removed for safety reasons. Or rolled out of the way on it's own.

  6. #16
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    Re: Tripod Holes

    My repeats tend to be taken when I am wandering by a familiar scene with a different format camera than before. Bound to happen photographing along the same creek for 40 years...
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  7. #17

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    Re: Tripod Holes

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Klein View Post
    I just noticed that the boulder must have been removed for safety reasons. Or rolled out of the way on it's own.
    Do you mean the big boulder in the arch? Is that a person standing in the arch in the scene with the boulder? It's hard to tell from the images. The fate of the boulder is intriguing. If I am ever in Arches NP again, I will try and remember to look for the boulder.

  8. #18

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    Re: Tripod Holes

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    My repeats tend to be taken when I am wandering by a familiar scene with a different format camera than before. Bound to happen photographing along the same creek for 40 years...
    You probably know this, but the differing format does not matter that much, and makes no difference as long as the same stand-point is used, the images are centered, and the field of view of the original is captured (easier with a slightly wider lens). This all assumes cropping during enlargement. The originals scenes I am retaking include a wide range of formats. I use a 4 by 5 for all of them, except one that was from a tiny pinnacle in the Tetons, where I knew I would not be able to set up a tripod, as I had been there 35 years ago. Here, I used a 6 by 9 Voigtlander Bessa II and a Nikon F as a back-up. I think the original, taken in 1936, was with a Leica or some other small camera.

  9. #19
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    Re: Tripod Holes

    Quote Originally Posted by mmerig View Post
    Do you mean the big boulder in the arch? Is that a person standing in the arch in the scene with the boulder? It's hard to tell from the images. The fate of the boulder is intriguing. If I am ever in Arches NP again, I will try and remember to look for the boulder.
    Yes, the big boulder in the arch. That is a person standing in the hole which is now 77 feet across about double what was there before. So that was a big boulder that fell out. Did it roll down the hill subsequently? Or moved by the park rangers? You might ask them if you're there and let us know what you found out. I'm curious. Thanks.

  10. #20
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    Re: Tripod Holes

    Quote Originally Posted by mmerig View Post
    You probably know this, but the differing format does not matter that much, and makes no difference as long as the same stand-point is used, the images are centered, and the field of view of the original is captured (easier with a slightly wider lens). This all assumes cropping during enlargement. ...
    It ends up mattering a great deal to me. I contact only, no cropping, so one reason to retake it in a larger format is to have a bigger print of a scene and its light. Since I often include the film's rebate as part of the image, my personal working assumptions are much different than yours. Moving from a 4x5 to an 8x10 when 'retaking' an image requires a longer lens in order to maintain similar perspective (spacial relationship between near and far) and framing (edges and corners that define the center) of the original image.

    But rarely can I improve upon the original seeing. It is difficult enough to be in the same place in the same part of the season, at the right time of day with the same wind and light conditions. So I tend to treat each use of a different format from the same spot as a different image. The closer the retake is to the original, the more I am usually dissatisfied with it. After two or four decades, one would hope I have learned a thing or two about a thing or two, and see some improvement or hint of maturity in my images.

    Photographing along Prairie Creek for the last 40 years has been long enough to appreciate the many changes it has gone through in such a short time. A fallen giant and an opening to the sky created...the trunk of the fallen slowly becoming an elevated forest of berries and conifers. A scrawny 100 year old redwood in direct sunlight for the first time starts to stretch upwards. A bench of gravel left by the floods of Dec. 1964 slowly fills in with ferns, grasses, berries, then alders. The 250 year old maples standing proudly on the back of this bench against the backdrop of redwoods, have been collapsing one by one as they near their three century age limit. Each one was a vertical forest of lichen, moss and ferns, from the bottom of the trunk to the end of each branch, and weighing more than its leaves. Young maples are standing near-by.

    That is the sort of thing I am trying to say using the light falling through centuries of redwoods.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

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