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Thread: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

  1. #31
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Dec 2011
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    12,181

    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    The area I now live in was clear cut and destroyed. My 1920 home is made of all first growth hardwood covered by vinyl siding. Even interior walls are covered up hardwood. Nearby is a 1818 cabin when IL became a state and it was all trees.

    I have 1 huge oak tree that must be a survivor and a couple wannabees.

    Now the Feds want to cut the Shawnee Forest again!

    Here's USDA history of what happened. The CCC made the whole area great again.

    I expect data like this will be erased.

    https://www.fs.usda.gov/detailfull/s...telprdb5151363

    "Morris Birkbeck's 1818 booklet, LETTERS FROM ILLINOIS ...the view of that noble expanse (the Ohio River) was like the opening of a bright day upon the gloom of the night, to us who had been so long buried in deep forests. It is a feeling of confinement, which begins to damp the spirits, from this complete exclusion of distant objects. To travel day after day, among trees of a hundred feet high, without a glimpse of the surrounding country, is oppressive to a degree which those cannot conceive who have not experienced it; and it must depress the spirits of the solitary settler to pass in this state. His visible horizon extends no farther than the tops of the trees..."
    sin eater

  2. #32
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    13,261

    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Domaz - the company I worked for originally began with two lumber buyers for the Navy, who went into commercial partnership after WWII and started supplying the military afterwards. Not until the 70's did it significantly expand into coatings, equipment, etc, when I took on those kinds of opportunities. We held the largest stockpile of high quality kiln-dried fir and redwood in the Bay area. But for awhile, while there were still several large Naval bases on SF Bay, the Navy was a prime customer and got whatever they specified. Their fire extinguisher trainings at these bases required a certain pitch content of wood; so they'd come and buy 40K of clear kiln-dried vertical-grain fir at the time - furniture-grade, and burn it all up on a bonfire within fifteen minutes a few days later. That incensed me. But's that's just the mentality of the military. More recently, a very well known techie gazillionaire bought half the world's supply of Port Orford cedar for his house. He wouldn't like a particular feature or another, so would have up to three million worth torn down at a time during original construction, and then start over on that section of the house. Some good friends of mine built it, and we supplied everything but the cedar. Port Orford is exceptionally squirrelly dense stuff which requires a lot of thickness planing on site. The workers couldn't figure out why they could never got over their "colds" and bronchitis (tannic acid inhalation from the sawdust). The gazillionaire only lived in it a few months, and in the meantime, decided his yacht was too small, so had a wooden yacht built big enough for a full basketball court on deck; then even that was too small, so built the biggest yacht in the world out of carbon fiber. Thus enormous quantities of various species of old growth forest get chopped down just to assuage the egos of the very rich. It's always been like that. The Romans almost wiped out entire species of large mammals north of the Sahara for sake of their bloody gladiatorial shows. I don't know how much guilt I share; but over the years I've been given leftovers of various hardwoods from those big projects, and have milled them myself into picture frames etc. But it sure beats burning them. A different famous techie gazillionaire/philanthropist ordered custom porch benches made of select endangered tropical hardwood by a local furniture maker to the tune of 40K apiece, about a dozen at a time, but didn't want to bother using marine finishes, so every six months threw them out after the wood began to discolor, and ordered a new set. Waste, waste, waste.

  3. #33
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Jan 2007
    Location
    Humboldt County, CA
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    7,218

    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tin Can View Post
    plus one

    i remember redwood picnic tables
    We had some nice ones in our USFS campgrounds -- and could order replacements made with fallen old-growth from the State Parks.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  4. #34
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    13,261

    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Now the NP tables are molded recycled poly/sawdust composite, much like Trex decking. They stain with grease just as bad too.

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