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Thread: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

  1. #11
    Jim Jones's Avatar
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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    A grill from a ceiling fluorescent light fixture might work well.

  2. #12

    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    I used these in my photo lab sink, they worked very well and were cheap.
    --- Steve from Missouri ---

  3. #13

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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    I think its a really bad idea to place anything in a darkroom sink, or on a darkroom floor for that matter...which has any degree of porosity and/or any tendency/capacity to retain moisture. Even a wood lattice which is coated with epoxy can be difficult to clean thoroughly...and if left in place in a sink bottom will eventually get full of crud - but if a good lab brush is used for this cleaning and the lattice is then stood up on end for drying between sessions...then things might be OK. But why make this trouble for yourself?

    I built my current sink out of 3/4" birch plywood, and (after installing a ventilation system) gave it multiple coats of marine epoxy. After a darkroom session, all trays get well rinsed and stacked sideways so they can dry prior to under-sink storage. Labware gets placed into a plastic coated dish drainer which stands up on feet at one end of the sink, and is allowed to dry prior to under-sink storage. The sink itself is 16 feet long, and is slightly slanted towards its draining end...but I still have a squeegee dedicated to the sink bottom which I'll use after darkroom sessions.

  4. #14
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Let's repeat that

    and I agree



    Quote Originally Posted by John Layton View Post
    I think its a really bad idea to place anything in a darkroom sink, or on a darkroom floor for that matter...which has any degree of porosity and/or any tendency/capacity to retain moisture. Even a wood lattice which is coated with epoxy can be difficult to clean thoroughly...and if left in place in a sink bottom will eventually get full of crud - but if a good lab brush is used for this cleaning and the lattice is then stood up on end for drying between sessions...then things might be OK. But why make this trouble for yourself?

    I built my current sink out of 3/4" birch plywood, and (after installing a ventilation system) gave it multiple coats of marine epoxy. After a darkroom session, all trays get well rinsed and stacked sideways so they can dry prior to under-sink storage. Labware gets placed into a plastic coated dish drainer which stands up on feet at one end of the sink, and is allowed to dry prior to under-sink storage. The sink itself is 16 feet long, and is slightly slanted towards its draining end...but I still have a squeegee dedicated to the sink bottom which I'll use after darkroom sessions.
    sin eater

  5. #15
    Greg Davis's Avatar
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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Yeah, but it keeps the moths away! I saw a photo of Kodak’s research darkroom with cedar duckboards, so I’ve been considering them, and one of their books suggests corrugated fiberglass roofing from the big box hardware store.

  6. #16

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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Think for a moment about the purpose of those duckboards...and what will happen to whatever spills onto and underneath them.

    Then, do yourself a favor and install/apply some non absorbent flooring (like vinyl or epoxy) which can be wiped clean when necessary. Kind of a no-brainer if you ask me!

  7. #17

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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    I installed two Calumet (before they went belly up) stainless steel sinks, one 7-footer & one 4-footer end-to-end. Then I went with plastic corrugated roofing, easily cut to the needed length in each sink. They serve their purpose well and are very light. After a session is finished I rinse them and the sinks off with a kitchen sink sprayer (installed at each sink). To dry, they are stood on end, resting on a towel and leaning against the tensioned overhead steel cable for drying films. The sinks are squeegeed then towel-dried, and given an occasional thorough cleaning with Calumet's recommended products. Trays are rinsed, towel-dried and placed with their short sides resting on the rim of the sinks, then when thoroughly dry are stored in an under-sink slotted bin - for trays up to 20x24 - that I built and attached (removable concept) to the under-sink shelf.

  8. #18
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    There was an individual proliferating quite a bit of how-to literature in this area about making darkroom sinks using marine grade plywood and marine epoxies. Why? He was the manufacturer of the epoxy. And people thought they would save a lot of money that way. But a basic sink would need around $200 of penetrating epoxy plus epoxy putty for the seams; and real marine ply would double that expense. You could take a lesser grade of ply and fiberglass it for considerably less. Nasty fumes either way. For really serious users I sold a liquid Hypalon rubber coating so nasty that now it takes a special Federal permit within the bounds of US waters. Likewise, polysilicone enamels. Back then you could also buy moisture-cure urethane coatings (totally different from ordinary urethanes). The faster it could kill you, the better it was. I dodged all those bullets and made my own 10ft sink out of heat-welded 1/4" thick polypropylene sheeting. It doesn't sweat underneath like stainless, is highly inert to all dkrm chem and solvents, but does superficially stain a bit with amidol. I don't use duckboards. I attach inert little feet to water jackets, oversize trays, etc, or integrally include risers when making slot washers.

  9. #19

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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Drew, I think Gordon Hutchings might of had the best idea-build it out of plywood and haul it over to Rhino Liner (spray on truck bed liner) and have them spray it. He said the only thing he'd found that stained it was Pyro.

    Me being cheap, I built mine out of plywood and 1 by 4's for the sides and gave it 3 coats of Rustolem truck bed liner. After 2&1/2 years, it's still water tight. It's kind of ugly, but it gets the job done. It stains a bit, but if it really bothered me, I have a spray can of the stuff to touch it up with. After all, it's a sink-not a work of art.

  10. #20

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    Re: Redwood grid for Darkroom sink.

    Made these out of treated pine about 10 years ago, they still look new and have worked Great. L

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