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Thread: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

  1. #11

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    Re: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

    RE: The cost of bellows.
    In the past have found it a lot easier to acquire, for usually little money, an 8x10 bellows that had some pinholes in it. Fixing the pinholes is easy, I'm sure plenty of threads on that topic in this FORUM. Adapting the bellows to another camera is a dozen times easier that making a bellows from scratch. The art of bellows making/construction has to be a fading art unfortunately.

  2. #12

    Re: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg View Post
    RE: The cost of bellows.
    In the past have found it a lot easier to acquire, for usually little money, an 8x10 bellows that had some pinholes in it. Fixing the pinholes is easy, I'm sure plenty of threads on that topic in this FORUM. Adapting the bellows to another camera is a dozen times easier that making a bellows from scratch. The art of bellows making/construction has to be a fading art unfortunately.
    Especially when camera bellows in england make a fine product..I challenge anyone show me their homemade made and do a comparison

  3. #13
    Peter De Smidt's Avatar
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    Re: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by peter schrager View Post
    Especially when camera bellows in england make a fine product..I challenge anyone show me their homemade made and do a comparison
    +1.
    J. Haidt's 3 great untruths:
    What doesn’t kill you makes you weaker.
    Always trust your feelings.
    Life is a battle between good people and evil people.

  4. #14

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    Re: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

    Prime cost of 8x10 is film, then time and resources required to make images on 8x10 film. About $5 USD per sheet, or about $130 per box of 25 sheets for B&W, trying to save $ on fixing a bellows is, "Penny wise, Pound Foolish". If the bellows with holes that has been repaired springs a light leak causing unexpected exposure of an entire day's of 8x10 film and effort, what are the actual cost involved?

    In the case of a vintage 8x10 camera, great if properly restored and in fine working condition. Otherwise, get a 8x10 camera and outfit that is known and proven in good condition with no problems if one is interested in making images. If this is a tinkering endeavor, then taking on a restoration, then making the camera and outfit good again is great in many ways.

    IMO, not wise to penny pinch for a bellows which is fundamental view camera operation item.

    Be aware of the cost and resources involved with any view camera endeavor. These days, cost of the hardware is much lesser than what it once was, cost of film and related resources might not be low.


    Bernice

  5. #15

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    Re: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernice Loui View Post
    Prime cost of 8x10 is film, then time and resources required to make images on 8x10 film. About $5 USD per sheet, or about $130 per box of 25 sheets for B&W, trying to save $ on fixing a bellows is, "Penny wise, Pound Foolish". If the bellows with holes that has been repaired springs a light leak causing unexpected exposure of an entire day's of 8x10 film and effort, what are the actual cost involved?

    In the case of a vintage 8x10 camera, great if properly restored and in fine working condition. Otherwise, get a 8x10 camera and outfit that is known and proven in good condition with no problems if one is interested in making images. If this is a tinkering endeavor, then taking on a restoration, then making the camera and outfit good again is great in many ways.

    IMO, not wise to penny pinch for a bellows which is fundamental view camera operation item.

    Be aware of the cost and resources involved with any view camera endeavor. These days, cost of the hardware is much lesser than what it once was, cost of film and related resources might not be low.


    Bernice
    Excellent advice, and something I'm debating myself. Fix the old or buy new. $5 a sheet adds up but a lost image is priceless.

  6. #16

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    Re: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by peter schrager View Post
    Especially when camera bellows in england make a fine product..I challenge anyone show me their homemade made and do a comparison
    I'm sure they're great, but how much do they cost?

  7. #17

    Re: cost expectations for 8x10 restoration

    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan View Post
    I'm sure they're great, but how much do they cost?
    I don't know the answer to that, but will chip in with a different take. Over the years I've had about a dozen Deardorffs and at least a dozen Cirkut Cameras, plus assorted Eastman 2D's, Anscos, and ROC's and probably others. I tend to buy users, not pristine cameras, but I've only ever replaced two bellows and one of those I should have kept. I have done various touch up to corners, and even tape, but just prefer the originals if at all usable. Some bellows are better than others, but those pretty brick red leather bellows on old Eastman products can be beautiful, supple things. Many US Agfa/Ansco's tend to be stiff and either shrink, or were not long enough to begin with, so that can be an issue.

    I also only ever refinished two and regretted both instances (not that they didn't come out fine). Usually what I find that really does need to be dealt with is missing and loose screws, or other small parts, and misassembled bits. Plus the occasional lousy ground glass. If you can find a complete camera with a usable bellows you can usually just go over things, clean it up, and go. It is well worth getting something with all it significant parts, including any extension rails or sliding blocks (2D, etc).It's just a dark chamber. I'd want a camera to be pretty darned cheap if it needs a bellows. The in between ones that are almost okay can be money pits, but fun for someone who wants a project. Just my preference, but there is more than one way to do things. I'll PM later with a couple things I spotted recently that might be of interest to you.

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