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Thread: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    Seoul
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by esearing View Post
    Thanks Xia_Ke, I looked at fstop bags but most reviewers didn't like the ICUs not being attached. Really interested in those who have used the Atlas bags, but they may be so new no one here has tried them yet.
    Hmm, the ICUs are one of the best things about the bags in my experience. And I have yet to discover a down side to those bags in use. I have two, a Guru and a Satori EXP. With an ICU fitted the Guru is perfect for smaller camera kits (anything from 35mm to 13x18), and with the ICU removed it will handle an 8x10 2D and a couple of holders with spotmeter and dark cloth.

    That bag has been around a bit with me, Mongolia, Peru / Chile / New York and Nepal a couple of times. The bags are excellent. The one thing I've heard of that could be a problem with F stop is that they allegedly had problems with turnaround of direct sales. I bought both my bags privately rather than direct from the company so had no such problems.
    Peter

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2019
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    66

    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by pjd View Post
    Hmm, the ICUs are one of the best things about the bags in my experience. And I have yet to discover a down side to those bags in use. I have two, a Guru and a Satori EXP. With an ICU fitted the Guru is perfect for smaller camera kits (anything from 35mm to 13x18), and with the ICU removed it will handle an 8x10 2D and a couple of holders with spotmeter and dark cloth.

    That bag has been around a bit with me, Mongolia, Peru / Chile / New York and Nepal a couple of times. The bags are excellent. The one thing I've heard of that could be a problem with F stop is that they allegedly had problems with turnaround of direct sales. I bought both my bags privately rather than direct from the company so had no such problems.
    +1. Great bags and the ICU design helps keeping everything protected and organized. Plenty of sizes to choose — the Ajna (40L) is likely the largest that can still be carry on. I find it perfect for 4x5 with 4 lenses and all typical required stuff including filters, etc. They’re not cheap but to me they are worth the investment.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Looking at ICUs and internal dimensions is an interesting exercise. The things I like about the Atlas Adventure pack are outside of the camera area so just needed to make sure all the stuff fits. I found an old Canon backpack with similar interior dimensions and used it to evaluate. It all fits except for the camera which would be fine for the Adventure backpack since it has a top section above the camera ICU. And still plenty of room to stuff a jacket and other items.

    15x12x9 My current ancient Quantaray backpack is a two level design which allows me to stack lenses on bottom section and stand holders upright.
    16x11x6.5 - old Canon pack which holds my DSLR and heavy glass but is uncomfortable for long hikes.
    17x10.5x6.25 Atlas Adventure with oragami feature in up position
    19.6x14x8.5 Lowepro AW650
    17.3x12.5x7.8 Lowepro 450 PT AW
    21x13x6 f64 XL BCP,
    19x11.5x7 Fstop XL ICU only - no bag/BYOB - may do better with two smaller ICUs as others have suggested.
    Adventure is worthwhile in itself. ... Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn't be done. -- Amelia Earhart
    http://www.searing.photography

  4. #14
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
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    Oct 2006
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    This discussion of packs and what gear goes into them is interesting. How to get it all into a pack is also interesting. I do envy you guys with the physical ability to get out of the parking lot with a load. I just can't do that any more.

    Which brings me to a subject not really addressed so far: Holw much does it WEIGH? How much weight do you carry on a day hike away from the car? How does this load change if you spend a night away? My in-the-city walk around shoulder bag , an old LowePro "Magnum-35", holds a light and compact Wista made Zone VI, three lenses, a light CF tripod and the other stuff. All-up, it weighs 25 pounds more or less. The shoulder bag is a compqact condensed package. I also have an old, mid 1980s, LowePro backpack that all the stuff can be packed into, but as I said, I just don't walk that far anymore.


    So then, Just how much weight do you carry?Click image for larger version. 

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    Drew Bedo
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2002
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    nyc
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    .
    Drew said:

    So then, Just how much weight do you carry?


    I hadn’t shot 8x10 for a couple of years. Decided to break out the camera. Loaded holders. Packed the camera, lenses, holders, tripod, etc. in my Sundog Art Wolfe backpack. Btw this is a great backpack for 8x10. Then came the big surprise. Tried to lift it and put it on my back and realized it wasn’t going happen. Ended up loading it on a cart. I eventually weighed it and it was 45 pounds. The backpack easily handled the weight but not me. Used to carry this when I mostly shot 8x10. I finally understand what Ánsel meant when he said he shoots the biggest format he can carry!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  6. #16

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    Mar 2002
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    The "Live Free or Die" state
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Drew Bedo View Post
    This discussion of packs and what gear goes into them is interesting. How to get it all into a pack is also interesting. I do envy you guys with the physical ability to get out of the parking lot with a load. I just can't do that any more.

    Which brings me to a subject not really addressed so far: Holw much does it WEIGH? How much weight do you carry on a day hike away from the car? How does this load change if you spend a night away? My in-the-city walk around shoulder bag , an old LowePro "Magnum-35", holds a light and compact Wista made Zone VI, three lenses, a light CF tripod and the other stuff. All-up, it weighs 25 pounds more or less. The shoulder bag is a compqact condensed package. I also have an old, mid 1980s, LowePro backpack that all the stuff can be packed into, but as I said, I just don't walk that far anymore.


    So then, Just how much weight do you carry?Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	191878Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	191879
    I like shoulder bags for working out of. However I don't like carrying much weight in them. A backpack with a good suspension makes carrying a heavier load pretty easy. I haven't weighed one of my loaded packs in a while, but 25 pounds is probably about right for the 5x7 bag with only camera equipment.

  7. #17

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    Apr 2009
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    Seattle area, WA
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    904

    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    For me the biggest requirement for a pack is full-zip opening or almost full-zip at least. That way I can open up the pack and easily pick the gear out and put it back in when done. I haul my 8x10 in the older version of this REI pack. Works fine, has a great waist belt and design, much better than any photo backpack I've used. If you wrap things up carefully (in your extra layers, dark cloth etc) you don't need any special internal cases or foam separators.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Suwanee, GA
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    So no one has seen or used the Atlas backpacks? - I guess I will be the guinea pig for 4x5 LF community , it should be here Wednesday. Atlas replied to my email that they have not received much feedback from LF users so I will do a review once I get it.

    The features that sold it for me over other bags:
    Well designed adjustable harness system and belt(removable)
    , expandability in non-camera areas or contraction by removing the frame
    , built in ICU with the origami top section for times when I want to carry less gear
    , the full zip opening back (vs partial center area)
    , other users enthusiasm on video reviews (there is a noticeable difference when talking about the Atlas backpacks vs other large camera backpacks)
    , and good customer service.
    Adventure is worthwhile in itself. ... Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn't be done. -- Amelia Earhart
    http://www.searing.photography

  9. #19
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Gebhardt View Post
    I like shoulder bags for working out of. However I don't like carrying much weight in them. A backpack with a good suspension makes carrying a heavier load pretty easy. I haven't weighed one of my loaded packs in a while, but 25 pounds is probably about right for the 5x7 bag with only camera equipment.
    I now have back and joint issues.

    this bag is often moved around on a set of luggage wheels. . . .and not very far from the car. It is more compact than the ancient LowePro Trekker AW, but not as protective. That backpack was unexpectedly thrown into an air plane hold and kept everything intact.

    As a young man I used to go backpacking (no photography) with 45-60 pounds of gear , food and water. That was a long time ago. I envy you guys who still can.

    Esearing: Best wishes for you with the new backpack. Please do let us know how it works out for you. Please post a link here for any review thatyou may do..
    Drew Bedo
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    First impressions: Bag is well made as described. Even the thinner materials feel stretchy and strong. AS I suspected I can get all my photo gear needed during a shot in the ICU, except for the camera which fits at the top of the bag and is accessible via zipper. The outer pockets will hold the less essential items like tools, food, keys, wallet, etc. The harness and belt are a bit stiff and will need some breaking in and adjustment. I ordered the XL belt extender to make sure the belt fit my waist, but did not need it, even with my belly. I was able to fit my tripod in the bags front outer pocket and secure it with the top flap. Just walking around the house a few minutes I can tell this pack will be much more comfortable and help me carry the load on long hikes. With all my gear there is still room for a rain jacket, snacks, water, Rope, and iff stretched to capacity an extra set of clothes. I could even bring my 135 rangefinders and a couple of lenses in their own case.

    Cons. ICU facing pockets need redesigning, they might be good for holding memory cards but are useless for my needs. The ICU itself is a bit shallow, only 6 inches. So I can not stand up holders or my meter which would free up space. Nor can I stack lenses. I would like to have some d rings built in to accommodate some additional straps or accessories , or some molle straps other than the top. With an accessory bag for 4x5 holders I could fit more in the bag. With the chest strap in place the new stiff harness digs into my chest under my arms (moobs), A woman might find it uncomfortable but would likely go for the smaller bag. This may just need some fine tuning and wear. Side pockets are tall and slim but not very useful.

    The bag would be ample for a DSLR or two, with a few zoom lenses, accessories, cards, chargers, etc.
    Adventure is worthwhile in itself. ... Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn't be done. -- Amelia Earhart
    http://www.searing.photography

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