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Thread: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    If you are physically fit and covering only short distances, any backpack that holds and protects your gear will do.

    If you are covering longer distances and/or navigating challenging terrain you need a technical pack. The central feature of a technical pack is well-designed frame that can be adjusted to fit your torso length along with an outstanding belt that is designed to cup the shelf of the hip bones. This allows the load to be transferred to the bone structure of your hips so that the load bearing muscles of your quadriceps are doing the work. The load "feels" lighter and moves with you more naturally. Alternatively a backpack sized is small, medium, large and extra large. This, however, impacts the gear you can haul.

    I did a search for "Front Loading Backpack with Adjustable Torso length" Nothing pops out as a natural choice. Of course the external frame like the Kelty Cache hauler or the like allows you the most efficient carry but are not the elegant solution for travel.

    Bruce
    Bruce

  2. #32

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    Nov 1999
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Photobackpacker View Post
    ...Of course the external frame like the Kelty Cache hauler or the like allows you the most efficient carry...
    Unfortunately, Kelty discontinued the Cache Hauler. I purchased one of these:


    It does the same job, has a harness that's even more comfortable, at least for me, than the Kelty's, and has the added benefit of standing upright when set on the ground.

    I got my Lastenkraxe from amazon UK:


  3. #33

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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Sal Santamaura View Post
    Unfortunately, Kelty discontinued the Cache Hauler. I purchased one of these:


    It does the same job, has a harness that's even more comfortable, at least for me, than the Kelty's, and has the added benefit of standing upright when set on the ground.

    I got my Lastenkraxe from amazon UK:

    Good info, Sal. I gave my Kelty Cache hauler to my son in law and he swears by it for hauling quartered elk out of the field. External frame packs are outstanding for heavy loads.
    Bruce

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
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    Suwanee, GA
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    One flaw in any pack design I did not consider; The taller and or thicker the pack the harder it is to duck under branches or partially fallen trees over a path. I have been on a few short hikes with my pack so far, and have it adjusted to my liking. Getting it on takes some effort due to weight and the stiff belt, but once in place it is quite comfortable to wear. Working out of the pack is a joy since all my gear is accessible from the back. I suppose if I were working in a tight space the size of the pack might be an issue.
    Adventure is worthwhile in itself. ... Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn't be done. -- Amelia Earhart
    http://www.searing.photography

  5. #35

    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    I'm not sure how you're donning your pack: here's a link that might help (video at bottom, with pertinent info starting at around the one minute mark)

    https://hiking.wonderhowto.com/how-t...operly-355857/

    The rule of thumb is simply to "zero-out" whatever strap-adjustments you have, i.e. make sure your hip belt/load lifters/etc. are loose before strapping in. (Also be prepared to make a stop a quarter mile or so down the trail to fine tune the fit.)

    Otherwise, if Bryan has you doing a lot of rhodo-crawls, a pair of leather gloves on a 'biner is de rigueur here in the Smokies, with a pair of knee-caps optional for off-trail loonies (or if you're just old and beat up like me.)

  6. #36

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    Dec 2014
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    that was helpful but my pack isn't that heavy (yet). No way he is ducking under bushes with that load.
    Adventure is worthwhile in itself. ... Never interrupt someone doing what you said couldn't be done. -- Amelia Earhart
    http://www.searing.photography

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Canmore Alberta
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    450

    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    An external frame pack is just the thing for carrying elk hind quarters, & definitely overkill for a light 4x5 kit. They went out of favour for technical terrain in the early '70s. I say that as someone who's carried a pack 200+ days in mountain terrain for 3+ decades. There are many fine adaptable packs from major makers as well as the photo-centric companies.

  8. #38
    Corran's Avatar
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    Apr 2011
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    North GA Mountains
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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by CreationBear View Post
    Otherwise, if Bryan has you doing a lot of rhodo-crawls, a pair of leather gloves on a 'biner is de rigueur here in the Smokies, with a pair of knee-caps optional for off-trail loonies (or if you're just old and beat up like me.)
    LOL

    Yeah Eric and I were talking about returning to a trail we did a while ago, and going a different direction where I've scouted, but he won't be able to use that big Atlas pack - unless he removes it every time we get into the thick brush!
    Bryan | Blog | YouTube | Instagram
    All comments and thoughtful critique welcome

  9. #39

    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Corran View Post
    but he won't be able to use that big Atlas pack
    "Root, hog, or die," I believe is the operative term here. For a Plan B, y'all might look into a low-profile 1500-2000 cu in daypack, and run it without a hip belt so you can slip it off and push it ahead of you when you get hung up. At any rate, rhododendrons I can abide, but with so many hemlocks coming down here in the Smokies, traversing some of my favorite brookie streams has become an exercise in negotiating quarter-mile sections of chevaux de fries.

  10. #40

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    Re: Atlas BackPacks for 4x5

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Y View Post
    An external frame pack is just the thing for carrying elk hind quarters, & definitely overkill for a light 4x5 kit. They went out of favour for technical terrain in the early '70s. I say that as someone who's carried a pack 200+ days in mountain terrain for 3+ decades. There are many fine adaptable packs from major makers as well as the photo-centric companies.
    The problem is that these top-notch technical backpacks are not front panel openers. If you are willing to handle your kit from a top loader you are all set. The current crop of back/oyster openers are "one-size-fits someone" - often with waist belts that are way too wimpy to effectively transfer the weight. With your experience, and mine, we know that a proper fit combined with an effective belt and frame can make any load feel lighter while minimizing the balance impact, discomfort and fatigue. With my P3 design I started with the frame sheet, ease of adjustability, well designed belt and shoulder straps offered in multiple sizes. Once I found the combination that didn't break the bank, I added the pack that was designed for photography use.

    From demonstrating the impact of efficient weight transfer at numerous trade shows across the country, my experience is that the majority of photographers are wealthy in their knowledge of photo gear and process but have never experienced the magic of a true technical backpack. I treasure the memories of the looks of amazement from those who loaded their kits into a properly adjusted P3 and then strapped it on.

    I regret that I could not find anyone to continue the Photobackpacker line when I decided to retire.
    Bruce

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