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Thread: The Setup and the Shot

  1. #31

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    1,316

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Bernice

  2. #32

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by DDrake View Post
    Wheat fields surrounding Whelan Cemetery, one of the last remnants of original unplowed Palouse prairie.
    A nice backyard you have there! (I'm similarly blessed living on the outskirts of the Smokies.)

    I am another LF newbie, so I definitely get how wrestling with the camera gets in the way of seeing the shot. I do think your last iteration is by far the strongest composition--I like how the zig-zag created by the hawthorne (?) on the right to the dogwood (?) on the creek bank, to the feed mill on the ridge adds depth to the frame, especially when you're retaining a square-ish aspect ratio.

    Speaking of which, I could definitely see you throwing a 6x12 RFB in the bag in that part of the world to work the "pano" side of the street. (And to be honest, having some Portra on hand might be nice, too--I think part of what you're feeling about this set is that you were shooting B&W when the conditions favored color.)

    Otherwise, that really seems like a great vantage point to stake-out in all sorts of weather--being a simple soul myself, I wouldn't mind seeing what that tree down on the creek looked like just by itself, with balsamroot in the foreground and the dark, cultivated slope behind as a kind of "sky." Use Bernice's 5x7 crop, though.

  3. #33

    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    101

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Hi CreationBear,

    Thanks for the comments. Yes, it's a nice backyard (as is the Smokies, although I've only been there once). That particular location is only about 5 miles from work, and on my way home (assuming 'way home' is a leisurely drive on gravel backroads). So easy enough to go back time after time--no particular picture is precious. In fact, I plan to do some shooting there this weekend or early next week.

    I've been thinking about getting a box of Portra--I've shot it in 135 and love the color, esp. through vintage glass. 6 x 12 RFB is also an interesting idea, except I didn't build my 4x5 to accept standard backs. Maybe the Mk. II...

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    101

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Thanks, Bernice, for taking the time to make a crop. It's not hesitant, and cuts away just about everything but what's essential (revealing all sorts of technical flaws, but I can try to correct those next time). It's a good example to keep in mind, I think, and I appreciate that you frequently go to the effort to visualize your critiques.

  5. #35

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron Cornell View Post
    Back in the early 70’s I apprenticed under a master commercial photographer. We had an assignment from a major fiberglass insulation manufacturer to do a photo illustration for an ad of rolls if insulation in a construction environment. We built a construction set in the studio and placed the product in the shot. The 8 x10 transparencies were beautiful and we had no reservations that the client would love it. Sadly when the client came to view it he rejected it due to the way one roll of fiberglass was laying in the shot. The client pointed out a little detail that no professional would place the product as we did. A detail we overlooked killed the shot. We had to reshoot and got it right second go around.

    This shot reminds me of a shot, think it was a pro color lab, that used a great older black man posing with a sax. Beautiful shot but the photographer blew the shot because of missing a little detail. I played sax for many years and it appears the mouthpiece is upside down. This is exactly the mistake that killed the credibility of the old black Jazz musician.

    The resolution is too low for a clear view but it appears the mouthpiece is upside down and doesn’t appear to have a reed on it. Oops! Otherwise it’s a nice portrait.

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    186

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    That’s really interesting, Don! This girl’s a player; actually, she’s a really talented player, so my guess would be that it’s correct, but I only play the piano, so I wouldn’t know. Look at the version on my site www.analogportraiture.com and see. It’s higher resolution there, so you should be able to zoom in pretty close.

    She’d named her sax Wendell, as in, the author, Wendell Berry, since it’s a bari sax.

    Cameron

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    St. Simons Island, Georgia
    Posts
    555

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Some ligatures have the screws on top, others on the bottom.

  8. #38

    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,316

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Thank You for not flipping out at me for hacking up your work to my interpretation of your image.

    Moment I've cropped that image, it is no longer your creation, interpretation of your image, it has become more of what "I" would have done. Desirability of either images is dependent on the viewer. Some will like your (original version), others might like my version. There are some basic foundational visual composition rules based on being human and a creation of Nature. Most if not all can be found all of Nature, challenge is to have enough sensitivity to listen and hear what these creations of Nature is trying to say.

    Photography is a Sympathetic artistic medium that can give visual voice to visual items that might not be able to share their visual expression alone. By means of framing, visual manipulation by camera-lens-imager resulting in a print that affords their visual expression or the image maker using them as a means of expressing what the image maker wants to express.



    Bernice




    Quote Originally Posted by DDrake View Post
    Thanks, Bernice, for taking the time to make a crop. It's not hesitant, and cuts away just about everything but what's essential (revealing all sorts of technical flaws, but I can try to correct those next time). It's a good example to keep in mind, I think, and I appreciate that you frequently go to the effort to visualize your critiques.

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    101

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    From yesterday, same location as before. Setup shot is a crop from a photo my son took.
    A breezy day, and I had FP4+ with me, so used f/11-f/16 to keep shutter speed high. Framing of first LF picture is inspired by Bernice's crop, but close to what was captured in-camera.
    Posting another picture from the set on the Cemetery thread.
    Edit to add: Comment and critique is welcome, as always.






  10. #40

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Cameron Cornell View Post
    That’s really interesting, Don! This girl’s a player; actually, she’s a really talented player, so my guess would be that it’s correct, but I only play the piano, so I wouldn’t know. Look at the version on my site www.analogportraiture.com and see. It’s higher resolution there, so you should be able to zoom in pretty close.

    She’d named her sax Wendell, as in, the author, Wendell Berry, since it’s a bari sax.

    Cameron
    oops and my apology!!! Looking at the higher res image what I thought was the top of the mouthpiece is actually the lower part of her arm. The ligature is one designed with the thumb screws on the top. Yes it’s correct. Thanks for posting the link.

    You have some lovely images.

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