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Thread: The Setup and the Shot

  1. #131

    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Western Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    89

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    A few weeks ago, before all this white stuff fell out of the sky, I decided to take my 8x10 kit on a hike up Mt. Greylock. While hiking it was great, but the next day my shoulders and back had some complaints to make. I had been hoping to get some nice landscapes looking off the mountain, but then the clouds came in and reduced visibility to only a few hundred feet. There is a small pond on the top of the mountain, and a shack next to the pond which is covered in graffiti. However, from this angle I thought it looked quite nice through the fog.

    Camera is a rajah (deardorff copy) 8x10, and the lens used was a Kodak Eastman Ektar 12"
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is a scan of the negative which I edited digitally. I'm still working to get a traditional print from it that I'm happy with.

  2. #132

    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Edgewood, New Mexico
    Posts
    38

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    I think I know that place. Merry Christmas, Jim.

  3. #133

    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    83

    The Setup and the Shot

    In Zamora Spain, the Duero river.
    Graflex crown graphic. FP4+125.
    https://flic.kr/p/2hXc12h
    https://flic.kr/p/2hXeeFS

  4. #134

    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Western Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    89

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro_fiz View Post
    In Zamora Spain, the Duero river.
    Graflex crown graphic. FP4+125.
    https://flic.kr/p/2hXc12h
    https://flic.kr/p/2hXeeFS
    Lovely view! The contrast between the jaged cliffs and soft water is especially nice. It’s also timeless which I like, someone could tell me it was taken in the early 20th century and I might believe them!

  5. #135

    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Posts
    83

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan View Post
    Lovely view! The contrast between the jaged cliffs and soft water is especially nice. Itís also timeless which I like, someone could tell me it was taken in the early 20th century and I might believe them!
    Thank you for your comments.

  6. #136

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #137
    David Schaller
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Williamstown, MA
    Posts
    584

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan View Post
    A few weeks ago, before all this white stuff fell out of the sky, I decided to take my 8x10 kit on a hike up Mt. Greylock. While hiking it was great, but the next day my shoulders and back had some complaints to make. I had been hoping to get some nice landscapes looking off the mountain, but then the clouds came in and reduced visibility to only a few hundred feet. There is a small pond on the top of the mountain, and a shack next to the pond which is covered in graffiti. However, from this angle I thought it looked quite nice through the fog.

    Camera is a rajah (deardorff copy) 8x10, and the lens used was a Kodak Eastman Ektar 12"
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pond001_25000dpi-Edit-2.jpg 
Views:	162 
Size:	35.9 KB 
ID:	198237
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	APC_0050.jpg 
Views:	133 
Size:	40.0 KB 
ID:	198238

    This is a scan of the negative which I edited digitally. I'm still working to get a traditional print from it that I'm happy with.
    Nice image, and I’m impressed! I would never be able to haul my Deardorff up the mountain. My hikes on Greylock now include only a MF camera, and I often don’t go to the summit. Let me know if you’re interested in company for 8x10 photography a bit closer to the car.
    Dave

  8. #138

    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Posts
    506

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro_fiz View Post
    In Zamora Spain, the Duero river.
    Graflex crown graphic. FP4+125.
    https://flic.kr/p/2hXc12h
    https://flic.kr/p/2hXeeFS
    This is amazing!
    --

  9. #139

    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    645

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    I've been away from the forum (and LF photography) for a couple of years, and I must say that this thread was a delight to discover today.

    A lot of folks talk about sharing, but it usually stops at the point of finished images and technical data. I have found studio photography, in particular, to be very challenging to emulate ("If you hope to do it better than the masters, maybe you'd best first learn to do it as well.") because there is such a range of possible technologies. I can tell the difference between a round beauty dish and a square softbox by looking a the catchlights in a subject's eyes, but not the size of the source, the distance in source diameters, or the nature of the room, and I find that these things are at least as important as the film brand, developer, or (usually) the lens....

    Many thanks for starting this thread, Cameron, and I hope that it stays with us.

  10. #140

    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    218

    Re: The Setup and the Shot

    Quote Originally Posted by Harold_4074 View Post
    I've been away from the forum (and LF photography) for a couple of years, and I must say that this thread was a delight to discover today.

    A lot of folks talk about sharing, but it usually stops at the point of finished images and technical data. I have found studio photography, in particular, to be very challenging to emulate ("If you hope to do it better than the masters, maybe you'd best first learn to do it as well.") because there is such a range of possible technologies. I can tell the difference between a round beauty dish and a square softbox by looking a the catchlights in a subject's eyes, but not the size of the source, the distance in source diameters, or the nature of the room, and I find that these things are at least as important as the film brand, developer, or (usually) the lens....

    Many thanks for starting this thread, Cameron, and I hope that it stays with us.
    Harold, I'm really happy that you've found this thread beneficial. I find the work of the practitioners in this community really inspiring.

    Cameron Cornell
    Washington State
    analogportraiture.com

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