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Thread: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

  1. #11
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    sin eater

  2. #12
    RedGreenBlue's Avatar
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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    Quote Originally Posted by Corran View Post
    Apologies if some of y'all have seen this. Have really only gotten one good result doing this. Long-term, I'd like to do more of these, but the conditions have to be just right, and that is fairly uncommon. And I don't always bring the right stuff.



    Oh yeah, and this one, but it's a 6x9 image so...well still applicable:

    Water is a great subject. Very nice.

  3. #13
    RedGreenBlue's Avatar
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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    I didn't take this photograph. I'm not quite that old, or talented. I assembled the 5x7 separation negatives in Photoshop. It was possibly taken at the NY Daily News color studio, run by Harry Warnecke, a pioneer color portrait photographer of celebrities, politicians and noteworthy personalities.

    Scott
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Lucille_Ball_smaller.jpg  

  4. #14
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    There are a lot of paths to it. I'm set up to do 8x10 in-camera separations (sequential), then pin-register enlarge them. Maybe next month I'll print an image or two if I get a break from other projects. TMax 100 is the most cooperative film in terms of matched linearity, which of course, is going to have quite a bit longer scale than doing this with a digital camera. Both Curtis and Devin cameras sometimes get reconditioned. You can get custom-made new pellicles and filters; it's a chore and expensive. I'd rather see it done with a beamsplitter prism if you want simultaneous exposures; but that would end up even heavier and require expensive custom machining. Of course, technicolor movie cameras had all this solved. In was routine to use view cameras separations for dye-transfer or color carbro still-life separations. Tri and quad carbon printing is more common today; but gum and casein printing is also around. A number of websites are dedicated to various approaches, both antique and present.

  5. #15

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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    Quote Originally Posted by RedGreenBlue View Post
    I didn't take this photograph. I'm not quite that old, or talented. I assembled the 5x7 separation negatives in Photoshop. It was possibly taken at the NY Daily News color studio, run by Harry Warnecke, a pioneer color portrait photographer of celebrities, politicians and noteworthy personalities.

    Scott
    That is the aunt of our warehouse manager who was with us until we closed in 2015!

  6. #16

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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    Quote Originally Posted by RedGreenBlue View Post
    Vance,

    That's your first attempt? Congratulations, it's a wonderful image.

    For better or for worse, here's a link to web pages I've prepared on the subject of tri-color photography. http://vintagephoto.tv/color1.shtml

    I've been told my guide to assembling separations in Photoshop is a bit tedious... but nonetheless the method and variations on the theme work for me.

    And here is one of my images. I enjoy taking the separations with a time delay so that the final image presents the passage of time in a colorful way.



    Scott
    Technically, this was my third image. I shot two on 35mm film, but I wanted to go bigger.

    I love this technique. All of the images posted are keeping me inspired to do more. Keep the images coming!

  7. #17

    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    Hello,

    For those interested in "Trichromie", you can find a huge source of informations on the following link : http://trichromie.free.fr/trichromie.../11/23/PDF2015

    Henri has made a lot of searches upon this subject and it gives a lot of "how to" and concrete (read strongly documented) explanations. Have fun.

    Jérôme

  8. #18

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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    My dad grew up in the Los Angeles area, not far from Curtis' Highland Park and later Griffith Park locations, and was enamored by their cameras. Over time, he built up a collection of tri-color cameras from Curtis and Devin, in plate sizes from 2.25 x 3.25 to 5 x 7. Amongst the collection was a 1947 Curtis price list, which is quite informative as to the process; see attached.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Edit: Here's a scanned, two-color dye transfer print my dad made with negatives from a homemade camera, of his younger brother circa 1938.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Attached Files Attached Files

  9. #19
    RedGreenBlue's Avatar
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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    I love this technique. All of the images posted are keeping me inspired to do more. Keep the images coming!
    This is from a 6x7cm roll film back on a Crown Graphic. The great thing about Seagulls is they aren't nervous. It wasn't about to move from its perch regardless of all the commotion I made with my gear.

    Scott
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 474648AUG7_another_crop_small.jpg  
    Last edited by RedGreenBlue; 11-Apr-2019 at 19:45.

  10. #20

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    Re: Tri-filter color images from B&W negatives

    I can't find any scans at the moment, but I've used this technique several times. I especially love it during sunset when the sun is moving fast in the sky and the shadows take on a rainbow effect. I've even done some still lifes with days to a week between exposures (to let flowers die). I print these using either 4 color gum or casein. For the black (key), just take the photo without any filters, and reduce the exposure of the film or printed layer to give you about 20% of the regular density. You could probably cut the pigment to 20% and expose and print normally too, but I haven't tried..

    One problem I have to deal with is keeping the large format camera steady between exposures. I always tend to bump it a hair between pulling the film holders in and out. It's not a big issue since I'm printing from digital negatives. It's easy to align everything in software.

    I'd really like to try a CMYKOGV print, but from what I read in my research, this technique (in the printing world) was virtually impossible before computers came along to control the relationships between the colors and that just seemed like a lot of work to figure out on my own. Maybe one day...

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