Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Ilford Ortho Plus film

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    8,878

    Ilford Ortho Plus film

    Anyone here shoot with it?
    Opinions? Suggestions?

    I'm curious to see how this film will handle Sierra granite.
    I steal time at 1/125th of a second, so I don't consider my photography to be Fine Art as much as it is petty larceny.
    I'm not OCD. I'm CDO which is alphabetically correct.

  2. #2
    Eric Woodbury
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    1,299

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    JK

    I've recently started using it. I have a bunch of it in the darkroom waiting to be souped. I took a little in the summer too. I'll see if can get a scan.

    I rate it at about 64 ASA, but nothing tested or official. I've been developing normal to normal +2 in XTOL 1:1 (Legacy version). It builds contrast quickly.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    SooooCal/LA USA
    Posts
    1,668

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    Ortho films I have used will build up contrast quickly... Good to think "spectrally" when using them...

    The sky is blue and bright, so that will build the highest density (like the 19th century photos), as well as areas that are illuminated by skylight...

    The things that don't build up density quickly are objects that are more towards the red end of the spectrum that don't get so much light...

    Look at the color of the rocks, tree bark, ground etc and expect them to stay darker if redder, and other stuff more green/blue might build more density faster, so the choice of ortho might be based on conditions where you normally shoot (and the color environment)...

    Testing, testing, testing...

    Steve K

  4. #4
    Pastafarian supremo Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    north central Pa., USA
    Posts
    557

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    Check out mid to late 19th century western landscape photos if you want to see how true orthochromatic emulsions render the scenes. I found this for you to check out:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ered-time.html
    Rick Allen

    Argentum Aevum

    practicing Pastafarian

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    8,878

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Check out mid to late 19th century western landscape photos if you want to see how true orthochromatic emulsions render the scenes. I found this for you to check out:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ered-time.html
    Cool photos, thanks!
    I'll be developing by inspection under a red safe light like I did with ORT-25 back when it was available, so I'm hoping density won't be an issue.
    The subjects I'm contemplating shouldn't have any sky in the scene.
    I've used D-76 50/50 with distilled water to soup Ort-25 so that's probably going to be where I'll start with the Ilford.

    Thanks for the suggestions.
    I steal time at 1/125th of a second, so I don't consider my photography to be Fine Art as much as it is petty larceny.
    I'm not OCD. I'm CDO which is alphabetically correct.

  6. #6

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    I have used it quite a bit but not recently, and I always liked the results. Have some frozen in the deep freeze.
    “The secret of getting ahead is getting started.”
    ― Mark Twain

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Glasgow
    Posts
    583

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    It's pretty similar to FP4+ sans red sensitivity in my experience. I've shot a few sheets in camera here and there (mainly use it for masking and other technical purposes) over the last year - more UV, the more ortho the look. It can look surprisingly 'normal' if it's not super sunny. Will try & dig out a few Hasselblad/ Imacon scans I made. Don't use anything less than a deep red (906 from Ilford) safelight - even a 1A might not be enough. I like it a lot, need to shoot more with it & get times & EI's worked out for day-to-day use.

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    CA Central Coast
    Posts
    613

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    Orthochromatic film is green sensitive [in addition to blue]
    Early films, such as used by Sullivan, etc, were color blind, meaning response to blue light [only]
    The response of ortho film may be slightly modified by yellow 'ray screens'
    [which brings to mind the Martian tales of Edgar Rice Burroughs and the 'eight Barsoomian ray]
    Graduated ray screens were used to tame skies to some degree
    The 1904 Kodak catalog mentions orthochromatic sensitivity, in blurb for its new NC [non curling] film.
    Blue sensitive film continued for use for a decade or two after- it was cheaper, just as plates were cheaper than the easier to use roll films and pack films.

    Now then, I wonder if there is an available lith film which is really color blind, so that red subjects are rendered black.
    [without a red filter factor of 27 stops]
    I'm thinking a Pyro developer could tame the contrast.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Sep 1998
    Location
    Oregon and Austria
    Posts
    2,322

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Check out mid to late 19th century western landscape photos if you want to see how true orthochromatic emulsions render the scenes. I found this for you to check out:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...ered-time.html
    Timothy O'Sullivan's wet plates were blue-sensitive, i.e., monochromatic. Orthochromatic film is sensitive to blue and green and will render green objects (e.g., foliage) a lot lighter than a blue-sensitive emulsion will. Shadows are gratifyingly open; blue skies will be quite light.

    Best,

    Doremus

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    San Joaquin Valley, California
    Posts
    8,878

    Re: Ilford Ortho Plus film

    That's good to know about greens appearing lighter, as foliage will definitely be in some of the shots. Thanks!
    I steal time at 1/125th of a second, so I don't consider my photography to be Fine Art as much as it is petty larceny.
    I'm not OCD. I'm CDO which is alphabetically correct.

Similar Threads

  1. Ilford Ortho Film: Why? and Why 10x12?
    By Richard K. in forum Resources
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 2-May-2011, 23:47
  2. Ilford Ortho Plus Film
    By Eric Woodbury in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2011, 13:38
  3. Ilford Ortho Plus
    By Bill Brady in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 9-Nov-2000, 23:13

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •