Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 31

Thread: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

  1. #21

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    The "Live Free or Die" state
    Posts
    896

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Quote Originally Posted by nomennominatur View Post
    I am aware that anti Newton glass should display some roughness, however, neither with naked eye, nor with a 10x loupe am I able to discern any roughening. However, I do not get any Newton rings at all, sandwiching the film without any spacers. I am a bit puzzled myself. The glass is from a rather prestigeous framing shop out of town. Next time I go there, I will ask the owner about the technical details of this archival glass, which he uses only for the most expensive framing jobs. The glass is rather thin, thus the top glass does not brutally weigh down the negative, yet flatness is more than sufficient for my DOF setting.

    Kind regards
    Mathias
    Perhaps your museum glass is the type with an antireflective coating on it? If so make sure you clean it like you would a camera lens. I have a few sheets I've tried in the enlarger and they seem to do a decent job with newton rings on most of the time.

  2. #22
    schatten & licht nomennominatur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    21

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Gebhardt View Post
    Perhaps your museum glass is the type with an antireflective coating on it? If so make sure you clean it like you would a camera lens. I have a few sheets I've tried in the enlarger and they seem to do a decent job with newton rings on most of the time.
    Thanks. Multicoating seems to be an option, indeed. I just came across this:
    https://tru-vue.com/solution/museum-glass/

    But then, coating should not affect presence or absence of Newton rings which are a function of wave length and spacing, if my dim recollection of college physics does not fail me...
    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, in the expert's mind there are few."
    (Shunryo Suzuki)
    http://www.galerie-elsner.de

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    The "Live Free or Die" state
    Posts
    896

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Quote Originally Posted by nomennominatur View Post
    Thanks. Multicoating seems to be an option, indeed. I just came across this:
    https://tru-vue.com/solution/museum-glass/

    But then, coating should not affect presence or absence of Newton rings which are a function of wave length and spacing, if my dim recollection of college physics does not fail me...
    By reducing the reflection you reduce the rings since they are interference patterns created from the reflection of light between the two surfaces.

  4. #24
    Peter De Smidt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Fond du Lac, WI, USA
    Posts
    7,524

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Yes, my experience is that multi-coated glass does reduce Newton's rings, reduce but not eliminate.
    May tomorrow be a better day.

  5. #25
    schatten & licht nomennominatur's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    21

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Larry and Peter, thanks, that makes sense.
    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, in the expert's mind there are few."
    (Shunryo Suzuki)
    http://www.galerie-elsner.de

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Location
    The Hague, Holland
    Posts
    68

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Quote Originally Posted by rdeloe View Post
    ...The tethering approach looks very interesting. Unfortunately Sofortbild only works with Nikon. I have to get serious about finding something that works well with Fuji. Mind you, focusing with live view on the Fuji is actually very easy.
    Capture One Pro (v.11 or now v.12) is your best option for tethering Fuji camera's. Really fast, and it's also the best raw converter, most pro's swear by C1. Has a bit of a learning curve though and it's not cheap (though there is a cheaper Fuji-only version). Download a free trial at https://www.captureone.com

  7. #27
    Peter De Smidt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Location
    Fond du Lac, WI, USA
    Posts
    7,524

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    I agree with Jeroen about Capture One and Tethering. It's the best solution I've used.
    May tomorrow be a better day.

  8. #28

    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    16

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Quote Originally Posted by rdeloe View Post
    When you are camera scanning, the lens plane, sensor plane and the plane of the negative should be absolutely parallel (or as close as you can get). To ensure the scanning template is level, I installed four “furniture levellers” that allow each corner to be raised and lowered independently; these cost a few dollars at the local hardware store. I level the camera using the old trick darkroom workers know well for levelling their enlarger: place a mirror underneath the camera, on top of the level scanning template, focus on the front of the lens, and then adjust the camera until the front of the lens is dead centre in the frame. I find this is much more accurate than putting a level on the camera.
    Ahhhh Furniture levellers...... Thanks very much - I was thinking of ways to properly align my camera

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    Netherlands
    Posts
    141

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Quote Originally Posted by Blackmarxz View Post
    Ahhhh Furniture levellers...... Thanks very much - I was thinking of ways to properly align my camera
    One could also use three, then it would always be stable during adjustments. Or use a baseboard with three wooden wedges underneath at the edges, moving them in and out to level the baseboard and securing them temporarily with a bit of tape.

  10. #30

    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    Italy
    Posts
    33

    Re: Camera scanning on the cheap -- an example approach

    Hello to all.
    I need an advise on a freeware software that has a color negative to positive feature.

    I use MS Paint.net for viewing my scans since I don't need any high resolution or super adjustment for printing output.
    Unfortunately, I cannot covert color negatives into positive with it (only "invert colors" which turns a color negative into a total blue image).

    Thank you!
    A good picture requires taking risks

Similar Threads

  1. What is the best approach to getting your work seen
    By Craig Griffiths in forum Business
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 7-Jan-2012, 12:12
  2. How to approach galleries?
    By Marek in forum Business
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 1-Mar-2004, 09:43

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •