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Thread: Scheimpflug Question

  1. #11
    schatten & licht nomennominatur's Avatar
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    Re: Scheimpflug Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    Or you can adjust both the lens standard and the back...
    This is why, in my original post. I wrote „tilting the lens and/or back“

    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    When all three planes are parallel, they do not intersect (at least in Euclidian geometry) [...] So your premise here is false.
    Well, it took two thousand years and people like Gauss, Bolyai and Lobatschewskij to solve the riddle of Euklid‘s so-called parallel axiom. Thus I feel no shame to admit the error of my ways

    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    Planes always intersect in a line (lines intersect in a point).
    This is true for TWO planes. However, with focus plane, lens plane and film plane we have THREE planes. Thus, in geometry, it is very well feasable to have three planes intersect merely at one point in space (visualize e.g. two orthogonal planes and a third one angled at 45 degrees with regard to both of them). That this will not happen in photography, has been convincingly explained by Rick Denny in post #7, pointing out that the focus plane is not a degree of freedom but is „tethered“ to the other two planes and determined by them.

    Scheimpflug in photography really is a strange mixture of pure mathematics, empiricism and art. I appreciate all answers and comments. I have benefited.
    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, in the expert's mind there are few."
    (Shunryo Suzuki)
    http://www.galerie-elsner.de

  2. #12
    New Orleans, LA
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    Re: Scheimpflug Question

    All this talk of planes and Euclids makes my head hurt! Perhaps you are only curious about Scheimpflug in the theoretical sense but, if one does want a quick, practical way to achieve it in the field or studio, there is another method in addition to the one shown in the video.

    After setting up the general composition and determining you will need to either tilt or swing, you focus on the farthest point you want to be in focus. Tilt (or swing, as the case requires) towards the nearest point you want in focus until both far and near points are equally out of focus. On the gg this is easily seen. Refocus on either point and everything along the plane between far and near points will be in focus. Usually takes one iteration to achieve and Euclid is not looking over your shoulder and screaming, "What has been affirmed without proof can also be denied without proof!"

    Happy New Year!

  3. #13
    schatten & licht nomennominatur's Avatar
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    Re: Scheimpflug Question

    Quote Originally Posted by Thom Bennett View Post
    All this talk of planes and Euclids makes my head hurt! Perhaps you are only curious about Scheimpflug in the theoretical sense [...]
    First of all, I am interested in the practical application, i.e. going out into the field to take some pictures! But then, I have the dangerous habit of digging to the roots of any complex matter that I encounter in my profession or in my hobbies. Makes it time-consuming (but very rewarding) for me, yet sometimes rightfully exasperates my family

    Quote Originally Posted by Thom Bennett View Post
    After setting up the general composition and determining you will need to either tilt or swing,[...]. Usually takes one iteration to achieve and Euclid is not looking over your shoulder and screaming, [...]
    This is actually the gist of what can be found in the wonderful Linhof book "Camera Movements" that contains all one needs to know without any maths. A PDF of the book is thankfully made available by Laflex:
    https://drive.google.com/file/d/1p8d...9VlDD49jB/view

    Happy New Year!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    "In the beginner's mind there are many possibilities, in the expert's mind there are few."
    (Shunryo Suzuki)
    http://www.galerie-elsner.de

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