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Thread: What to Buy for Film Processing

  1. #31

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    Re: What to Buy for Film Processing

    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    Yes, but I'm thinking of tray developing those. They are expensive, and generally I'm shooting something "special" with them, like portraits. Tray development under red light will allow me to stop the processing when the exposure looks at its peak, right?


    Kent in SD
    Not if your film is panchromatic. Orthochromatic films are not red sensitive.

  2. #32
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    Re: What to Buy for Film Processing

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    Not if your film is panchromatic. Orthochromatic films are not red sensitive.

    The plates are definitely ortho--I load/unload them with a red light all the time. The Ilford film is pan, of course. That's what the tank is for.


    Kent in SD
    In contento ed allegria
    Notte ed di vogliam passar!

  3. #33

    Re: What to Buy for Film Processing

    This thread is making me interested in attempting dry plate photos. If you don’t mind please post links to any instructionals you would recommend. If I start saving up I will hopefully be ready to make some images in the spring.

  4. #34

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    Re: What to Buy for Film Processing

    Not sure what/if you decided yet, but I will tell you what works for me.

    Equipment wise I use a Patterson 3 reel tank. This lets me to daylight develop 35mm, 120, and 4x5 with ease, both BW and color. I simply load the tank up with whatever reels fit the format and develop. All can be found new at a pretty affordable price. I load film in my bedroom closet and develop everything in my kitchen.

    BW is easy to do at home. Simply find a developer you like (this will require using different film/developer combos) and follow the times. Pretty easy and temp control is not crucial. Color (and even E6) are not that difficult either. I would almost say they are actually easier as long as you can find a way to control the temperature. I solved this problem with a sous vide cooker from amazon. Simply place the chemicals in a bath and bring to temp and the cooker will hold them there for hours.

    The question of what developer to use is a very subjective one. I suggest starting with something easy (I like ilfasol 3 for this, though I use others for other reasons) until you get the technique down. Once you feel comfortable with the technique and process of developing, start trying other combinations. I have found filmev.org a useful resource for this, as it has a large list of film/developer/time recipes with examples to show the results others have gotten using them. Similarly, when actually developing film I have found the Massive Dev app from digitaltruth.com to be very useful as it actually has timers for each step of the developing process for hundreds of film/developer combinations.

    Hope this helps some.

  5. #35
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    Re: What to Buy for Film Processing

    OK, all my stuff for processing has come! Have a bottle of HC-110, bottle of Photographer's Formulary tf4, bottle of Photoflo, 2 gallons distilled water, the SP-445 tank, digital thermometer, small measuring cup 60ml (marked in 10ml increments,) and to put the mixtures in I bought two calibrated shaker bottles 16oz/500ml (marked in 50ml increments.) My thinking on the plastic shaker bottles is they have lids which will cut down on fumes and round pour spout. Downside is I don't know how fast they will pour with ~15mm hole. I might have to drill a vent hole in the top so it will pour faster. Will use paperclips on a string to hang the sheets to dry. I also have exposed four sheets of FP4 today to test with. I think I have everything I need?

    I've watched a number of videos on processing and think I have the idea. I'll load the film in my interior bathroom which I can make very dark. It has running hot & cold water of course.

    What I don't know is how much chemcial to mix to actually do the processing. Looking on the back of the box of FP4 I see "Dil B" listed on the HC 110 line, along with some cryptic numbers. I have no idea what "dilution B" is or what the other numbers mean. Can someone tell me how much HC 110 I need to mix with distilled water to make 500ml of solution? Same for 500ml of tf4? Looks like tf4 doesn't need a stop bath other than water. If I knew how much to mix up and how long to keep each solution in the tank I think I can do this! I have some time on Friday to try.

    After I get proficient at processing FP4 @ ISO 125, I will start trying HP5 @ ISO 400, and finally HP5 @ ISO 800. Will also begin tray processing Lane plates as my confidence and skill improves.


    Kent in SD
    In contento ed allegria
    Notte ed di vogliam passar!

  6. #36
    David de Gruyl's Avatar
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    Re: What to Buy for Film Processing

    HC-110 Dilution B is a 1+31 mixture, which means that for 500ml of water you need 16 ml of syrup. (you can use 485 ml of water and 15 ml of syrup, if you prefer. That is the least of the inaccuracies, if you aren't doing film testing).

    TF4 is typically used 1:4, so for 500 ml of solution, you need 375 ml of water and 125 ml of concentrate. Do not use an acid stop with TF4 (it not only doesn't need it, but it is harmful to this particular fixer).

    Assuming the numbers you refer to on the back of the box are the same as the ones on the datasheet (https://www.ilfordphoto.com/amfile/f...roduct_id/688/) the normal developing at ISO 125 with HC-110B is 9 minutes (the middle number in the HC-110 line for small tank. The first number is exposed at ISO 50 and the last number is exposed at ISO 200) at 20 C. Honestly, 9 minutes sounds like a very long time for HC110B, but Ilford generally knows what they are talking about. This number corresponds to what is in the massive dev chart (which is 7-9 minutes).

  7. #37

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    Jul 2018
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    Re: What to Buy for Film Processing

    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    OK, all my stuff for processing has come! Have a bottle of HC-110, bottle of Photographer's Formulary tf4, bottle of Photoflo, 2 gallons distilled water, the SP-445 tank, digital thermometer, small measuring cup 60ml (marked in 10ml increments,) and to put the mixtures in I bought two calibrated shaker bottles 16oz/500ml (marked in 50ml increments.) My thinking on the plastic shaker bottles is they have lids which will cut down on fumes and round pour spout. Downside is I don't know how fast they will pour with ~15mm hole. I might have to drill a vent hole in the top so it will pour faster. Will use paperclips on a string to hang the sheets to dry. I also have exposed four sheets of FP4 today to test with. I think I have everything I need?

    I've watched a number of videos on processing and think I have the idea. I'll load the film in my interior bathroom which I can make very dark. It has running hot & cold water of course.

    What I don't know is how much chemcial to mix to actually do the processing. Looking on the back of the box of FP4 I see "Dil B" listed on the HC 110 line, along with some cryptic numbers. I have no idea what "dilution B" is or what the other numbers mean. Can someone tell me how much HC 110 I need to mix with distilled water to make 500ml of solution? Same for 500ml of tf4? Looks like tf4 doesn't need a stop bath other than water. If I knew how much to mix up and how long to keep each solution in the tank I think I can do this! I have some time on Friday to try.

    After I get proficient at processing FP4 @ ISO 125, I will start trying HP5 @ ISO 400, and finally HP5 @ ISO 800. Will also begin tray processing Lane plates as my confidence and skill improves.


    Kent in SD
    Did you load the film in your bathroom? Very dark won't doesn't necessarily cut it. Ideally you should have absolute dark to load film in the holders and the tank.

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