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Thread: I don't like slide film for scanning

  1. #71

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    Re: I don't like slide film for scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by interneg View Post
    Again, a fairly minimal toe, then straight line is not going to support 'exposing into the toe' -
    YK 'exposing into the toe' is supported by the facts. Churchill's portrait is only an example.

  2. #72

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    Re: I don't like slide film for scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by Pere Casals View Post
    YK 'exposing into the toe' is supported by the facts. Churchill's portrait is only an example.
    I think there's been a miscommunication somewhere along the line here - yes Karsh's negatives appear 'thin', but that's because the highlights are not overdeveloped but the shadows are well exposed - to quote Popular Photography's extremely in-depth May 1945 article on Karsh (findable on Google books) p.59, talking about how he controlled the contrast caused by his use of powerful fresnel spots "By the common practice of full exposure for the shadow areas and underdevelopment, working for thin negatives of about the density one seeks in small film." Not difficult to do - it's essentially how I expose & process LF film & it can often give a negative with a good range of interpretation depending on grade & printing choice - print softer & tonally, or boost the shadows with 4.5 & flash in the highlights (makes for wonderfully 'sharp' prints). Pretty much any film can be made to behave with this methodology. Straightforward to do, might take 2-3 sheets to zero in at worst - and any excuse to play around with fresnels & similar stuff is good!

  3. #73

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    Re: I don't like slide film for scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by interneg View Post
    yes Karsh's negatives appear 'thin', but that's because the highlights are not overdeveloped but the shadows are well exposed
    Sure... I think this is right. Of course he exposed shadows perfectly. But he also exposed well deep shadows compressed in the toe.

    IMHO with graded paper we have a lack of control compared with VC paper. With VC paper we may work the mids and then burning highlights or shadows with the grade we want. We cannot do that with graded paper as we have only one grade in the printing process.

    With graded paper, after taking a grade for the mids, be can burn shadows or highlights to adjust density but we won't be able to control local contrast by burning with an arbitrary grade.

    With graded paper a printer has to pick a grade for the mids, and then he finds that the paper shoulder/toe imposes a look. The photographer then requires an additional degree of freedom that it has to be nailed during film exposure, taking advantage of film's toe/shoulder, IMHO this requires a refined crafting.


    Since c. 1980 VC popularized, allowing an additional degree of control in the printing, then some (Sexton) thought that toe/shoulder were not necessary anymore, and linear TMax was born.

    But Sexton was shooting landscapes and objects. Many portrait photograpers (studio) still relied in TXP, sporting a toe and a shoulder, and (depending on development) some bump in the mids.

    Well, this is my interpretation... take it as an opinion because I'm still a rookie printer wanting to learn.

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