Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30

Thread: Last Sheet of Forte

  1. #21
    Kevin Kolosky
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Posts
    797

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    What happened to Forte?

  2. #22

    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    The "Live Free or Die" state
    Posts
    891

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin J. Kolosky View Post
    What happened to Forte?
    http://www.polywarmtone.com/

    TLDNR; Company structure wasn't able to react quickly enough to the traditional photo market contraction as digital took over. Company went bankrupt.

  3. #23

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    Quote Originally Posted by Larry Gebhardt View Post
    http://www.polywarmtone.com/

    TLDNR; Company structure wasn't able to react quickly enough to the traditional photo market contraction as digital took over. Company went bankrupt.
    actually I believe the land the factory was on was worth lots of money
    you people should try try Foma 131 warm tone paper..it's just beautiful

  4. #24
    Kevin Kolosky
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Posts
    797

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    which developer do you use with the Forma 121 warm tone paper.

  5. #25

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    I make up my own D55...but the agfa wt developer is very nice...made lots of points on both
    It's just cheaper and easier to make my own

  6. #26
    Kevin Kolosky
    Join Date
    Jun 1999
    Posts
    797

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    Wanna tell us whats in that D55?

  7. #27

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    From Photo Lab Index:

    Defender 55

    Water, 125 F/52C 500cc
    Metol 2.5g
    Sodium Sulfite, desiccated 37.5g
    Hydroquinone 10.0g
    Sodium Carbonate, monohydrated 44.0g
    Potassium Bromide 5.0g
    Cold Water to 1.0 l
    Last edited by Daniel Unkefer; 27-Jun-2019 at 05:56.
    The secret of getting ahead is getting started.
    ― Mark Twain

  8. #28
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    12,890

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    Forte had strong demand for their products right to the end, especially their VC paper, which many pro labs were using in high volume. But here's the problem of them sustaining profitability and choosing to throw in the towel, as I understand it: Their strongest point in competition was being able to deliver a high quality product at distinctly lower pricing. But facilities were wearing out and in need of a lot of maintenance expense. It seems all these Eastern Block coatings factories were once government subsidized for sake of government needed materials in volume. This allowed big factories, but simply too big to properly maintain once they became privatized. This kind of thing happened to various manufacturing lines which were not impacted by digital innovation at all. If a substantial nest egg is not put away for inevitable maintenance and remodeling needs, the business is either going to crash anyway, or has to find an investor with the necessary funds and willingness of risk, who will of course subsequently need to raise product prices accordingly. So no takers.

  9. #29

    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    801

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    Forte also had to meet EU RoHS standards. Eliminating a whole host of substances. This did in a heck of a lot of cameras too. The Pentax 67II, XPAN, list goes on trying to eliminate Lead solder was a major challenge.
    I don't understand why it's legal to make billions of tons of plastic yogurt cups, but not allow a little Cadmium in paper that will hang for 200 years

  10. #30
    Drew Wiley
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SF Bay area, CA
    Posts
    12,890

    Re: Last Sheet of Forte

    Those restrictions affected products well outside the EU, even earlier. It's rumored that the restriction of cadmium was the demise of the original Seagull G from Japan as well as Portriga from Agfa in Germany. It is a very nasty substance. There is such horrid soil contamination by lead and cadmium from former paint factories in this area that those particular neighborhoods are now essentially hermetically sealed by all that nasty stuff being capped off by concrete and asphalt; and you can't even drill a bolt hole in a concrete slab without a permit. I have artist friends with horrific health issues due to cadmium and lead in oil paints. There has been a method developed in the EU to coat cadmium with transparent titanium via vac deposition much like a lens, which makes it almost inert and harmless to mammalian physiology, even if accidentally swallowed. But ironically, the facilities that are capable of doing that aren't even allowed to obtain the cadmium, so unsafe artist's colors are still being made the old way on the basis of very restricted cadmium volumes. Leaded solder was voluntarily relinquished for use in Kentucky moonshine stills once people around there discovered they liked drinking lighter fluid better - that's a quip of course, but not far from the truth of what blinded certain people I grew up around in the foothills of the Sierra.

Similar Threads

  1. The End of Forte :-(((
    By Laj in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 19-Feb-2007, 09:11
  2. What's up with Forte?
    By paulr in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 14-Dec-2005, 02:17
  3. Why Forte?
    By John Cook in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 8-Dec-2003, 21:56
  4. Forte sheet film
    By Erik Ryberg in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2000, 21:21

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •