Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 27

Thread: Greetings from snowy Boston

  1. #11
    Les
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    1,100

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    Welcome to LF forum, Radu. Hope you can manage the current weather. Agree with those that 4x5 is easier to deal with, more films and lenses available in this format. I've gone bit wacko with 5x7, but have the 4x5 reducer whenever I need it.

    Les

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    southwest PA, USA
    Posts
    406

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    Welcome to LFPF! There are several large format shooters in New England so if you keep an eye on locations under our avatars you might be able to meet up with someone to shoot. I'd also recommend 4x5, but you could make contact prints with your current setup and an 8x10. The PHSNE show is definitely not to be missed.
    Bethe King
    www.ewfisher.com

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Boston,MA
    Posts
    42

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i remember the last time i went ( im in RI ) i left with stuff under both arms ...
    Haha, ok that makes me feel better to know there's at least one other. At swap-meets I'm like a kid in a candy store.
    Maybe we'll meet there. I'll wear a red carnation

    Oh it feels like the bridge will always be under construction. But at least they opened one way. I'm riding the T over it every day and there are barely any people on the job site...
    Last edited by radu_c; 15-Mar-2018 at 11:15.

  4. #14
    Ed Freniere
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Tyngsboro, MA, USA
    Posts
    77

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    Greetings from the outer suburbs of Boston. I agree that 4x5 is the way to start in large format. This is what I did almost 50 years ago, as a teenager. 8x10 was simply unaffordable then. Even now, everything in 8x10 is several times more costly than 4x5. On the other hand, when I finally started shooting 8x10 a couple of years ago, suddenly 4x5 seemed too small.

  5. #15
    Nodda Duma's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Brookline, NH
    Posts
    907

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    That's why I'm afraid to move up beyond 4x5
    Newly made large format dry plates available! Look:
    https://www.pictoriographica.com

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Boston,MA
    Posts
    42

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    Quote Originally Posted by photog_ed View Post
    I agree that 4x5 is the way to start in large format. This is what I did almost 50 years ago, as a teenager. 8x10 was simply unaffordable then. Even now, everything in 8x10 is several times more costly than 4x5. On the other hand, when I finally started shooting 8x10 a couple of years ago, suddenly 4x5 seemed too small.
    I know it's not in the same ballpark but shooting medium format for a few years got me used to that size; now when I look at my 35mm slides they look like spy films like in the old James Bond movies
    So I can totally see that happening when switching from 4x5 to 8x10.

    So then the natural question would be, aside cost, are there any good reasons why I shouldn't just start on 8x10?
    Parallel parking extraordinaire

  7. #17
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,450

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    Quote Originally Posted by radu_c View Post
    So then the natural question would be, aside cost, are there any good reasons why I shouldn't just start on 8x10?
    The first LF camera I used on my own was an 8x10, mostly because I wanted to make contact prints and because due to fortunate circumstances I had the opportunity to borrow a nice one to try out. Within a couple of years of that initial trial I had acquired, and was using, cameras in four different formats - 4x5, 5x7, whole plate and 8x10.

    For me, the magic of LF is in contact prints. If that's the goal, you can afford the cost and don't mind lugging a bit of extra weight, I'd say go for it. If you intend to enlarge, either in the darkroom for from scans, I think the argument for going larger than 4x5, and just how much larger, is a more difficult call.

  8. #18
    jp's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Maine
    Posts
    5,296

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    If you're looking for a field camera, I presume you want to lug it to places for landscapes... If you're doing portraits, by all means get a 8x10.. If you want to photograph something a mile in the woods, 8x10 can get heavy and you might not be as eager to transport it.. Each film holder is the size of a macbook.. The Camera and padding might not fit in most photo backpacks. The lens is a solid sometimes 5 pound chunk of metal and glass. Tripods are bigger.

  9. #19
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    7,450

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    An 8x10 outfit certainly can be a large burden, but it doesn't have to be. My 8x10 field kit for much of my early shooting was a lightweight camera (first a Nagaoka, later an original model Phillips Compact), a 270 G-Claron, three holders, BTZS hood, Sekonic 308 and a 3-series Gitzo. Everything except the tripod fit in my large f.64 backpack with room to spare; the tripod perched on my shoulder as I walked. I couldn't hike for hours uninterrupted that way, but 20 or 30 minutes at a time to be able to photograph in places well away from the car was no problem.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Arlington, Mass.
    Posts
    206

    Re: Greetings from snowy Boston

    An 8x10 field camera is ungainly but not necessarily that heavy. I have a Cambo 8x10 monorail that I really like but wouldn't take anywhere. I have a Kodak 2D and an Intrepid 8x10 and find them OK to schlep around a bit. Not nearly as packable as a 4x5, though, so as Oren said earlier, the question is probably more about contact printing vs. enlarging. I do some of both, though have a preference for contact printing.

    That having been said, if you're amenable to hybrid workflow, you can always scan 4x5, enlarge digitally (it's only 2x, with careful treatment it can often be done pretty well), and print a digital negative to do contact printing. There are many options...

    Robert Brazile

Similar Threads

  1. Just a walk in my snowy woods with Rolleiflex and gopro
    By jp in forum Image Sharing (Everything Else) & Discussion
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 13-Mar-2016, 03:56
  2. Hello from Boston!
    By cmace127 in forum Introductions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 18-Mar-2013, 20:10
  3. Boston E-6
    By William Whitaker in forum Resources
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 15-May-2011, 19:25
  4. Fall Colors in Snowy Range Scenic Byway Wyoming
    By sunkad in forum Location & Travel
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 30-Sep-2008, 21:22
  5. Hello from Boston
    By sparq in forum Introductions
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 2-Apr-2007, 11:39

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •