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  1. #1
    jp's Avatar
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    Evolving setup for short hikes

    I went out for a snowy nature walk this afternoon (return once it gets dark sort of outing)... I used to do this after school as a kid with other tools or toys. Now I leave early from work and go photographing. I came home early today to help unstuck my brother's plow truck.

    In my bag I have my meter, 4 film holders in antistatic bags, 2 lenses (verito and AE), and speed graphic. On my back is the Ries Junior tripod with a Tab Gear biathlon sling. I only shot 3 sheets of film this afternoon but had an enjoyable little adventure.


    IMG_20180308_171111 by Jason Philbrook, on Flickr

  2. #2
    Serious Amateur Photographer pepeguitarra's Avatar
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    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Ah, that is how you carry the heavy tripod. Thanks.

  3. #3
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
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    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Looks good. The important thing is that the gear doesn't get in the way of your creative process. If you are always thinking about how this or that should fit in or tie down it gets in the way of actually doing LF photography.
    Drew Bedo
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  4. #4
    Corran's Avatar
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    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Quote Originally Posted by jp View Post
    Tab Gear biathlon sling.
    Ah, a gun sling, interesting - I have long thought there should be a product to strap a tripod onto my back like that. Thanks for posting the pic.

    Lately my favorite backpack is a Lowepro ProTactic 450aw, and my tiny Sirui tripod straps to it nicely. I prefer to be able to pack everything away and walk unencumbered when hiking if possible. I can fit my Chamonix, a few lenses, and 18+ sheets of 4x5, or any number of configurations of MF gear into it. Sometimes I leave the Chamonix on the tripod while it's strapped to my backpack - it looks like a giant over-the-shoulder GoPro setup. I get odd looks on the trail but whatever .
    Bryan | Blog | YouTube | Instagram
    All comments and thoughtful critique welcome

  5. #5

    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Nice setup, the only scary thing is the location of the tripod head.

    --- Steve from Missouri ---

  6. #6
    William Whitaker's Avatar
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    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Quote Originally Posted by scheinfluger_77 View Post
    Nice setup, the only scary thing is the location of the tripod head.

    Before or after he sits down?

  7. #7
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Whatever works best for you! Swung low like that must keep a lot of snow from being knocked down your neck! Sometimes around here it would make sense to raise the pod high and attach an umbrella on it!

    I tend to go the other way...camera/holders/meter in a bag slung over my head and shoulder, and holding the pod (old Gitzo 300 series Studex) in my hand. Allows me to set up the pod without having to set anything on the ground/snow/mud whatever. If I am actively photographing (rather than just making distance, like after the light dies), the camera will often stay on the pod. This is with 4x5 or 5x7. The 8x10 stays in the pack (about 45lbs) and the pod (Ries A100/250) is in my hand.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  8. #8
    jp's Avatar
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    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Keeping the tripod head down keeps weight lower which is good for my back and general stability climbing / hopping rocks. Indeed keeping the tripod lower than my head keeps it from getting tangled in low hanging branches too, which in the winter have snow, and in the summer, potentially ticks. I don't use a compact carbon or aluminum tripod as I spend a lot of time along the shore and salt and gritty sand are abusive on the bushing/sleeve tighteners for round legs of contemporary tripods.

    I used to lug the tripod in hand, but was often setting it down to have both hands available. My camera bag has a convenient handle for that and the tripod doesn't. The tripod would get scuffed up from being set down on rocks and ground so I could have both hands available, and it doesn't matter if my camera bag gets scuffed up.

  9. #9
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Quote Originally Posted by jp View Post
    ...I used to lug the tripod in hand, but was often setting it down to have both hands available. My camera bag has a convenient handle for that and the tripod doesn't. The tripod would get scuffed up from being set down on rocks and ground so I could have both hands available, and it doesn't matter if my camera bag gets scuffed up.
    My Ries A100 is pretty beat-up looking. When I am off-trail, it gets used as a hiking/climbing assist and I have taken a few good falls with it...situations that would have wasted a carbon fiber. And using the pod this way has gotten me to places I otherwise would not have been able to get to. My 8x10 gear is 45 pounds on my back (w/o pod) and I prefer to be able to get the pod's weight (17 lbs?) on the ground instead of putting the weight on my back and/or knees on steep ground.

    Hiking with hands free is nice, I have resisted hiking poles when backpacking for that reason, but my knees are getting needy. I must admit that ten seasons of hiking in the wilderness with a shovel, pick-axe, pulaski or some other tool in my hand (and a mule's lead rope in the other) did get me use to it. Reminds me of an old joke I just made up. If you have a mule on one end of the rope and an ass on the other, how can you tell which is which? The mule has four legs.
    "Landscapes exist in the material world yet soar in the realms of the spirit..." Tsung Ping, 5th Century China

  10. #10

    Re: Evolving setup for short hikes

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn View Post
    My Ries A100 is pretty beat-up looking. When I am off-trail, it gets used as a hiking/climbing assist
    Should make a passable dibble-bar as well... A question, though: I love my Ries J-series, but I've been wondering if any one has tried to come up with "rubberized" feet for setting up on shelf rock or boulders? I've found the spikes to be great in soil or gravel, but that they skate a bit on our Thunderhead Sandstone here in the Smokies.

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