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Thread: Ektar 100 INDOORS

  1. #1

    Ektar 100 INDOORS

    I never shoot color but I need to for an upcoming project. I was wondering if anyone had positive experiences using eltar 100 under florescent lights.

    I know most color films are daylight balanced but certainly it must be doable. I will be making c-prints from the negatives but scanning is an option though I'd rather stay traditional

  2. #2
    Youngin Daniel Stone's Avatar
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    Re: Ektar 100 INDOORS

    Test test test.
    Especially if you're doing optical c-prints and want the best color rendition.
    This means filtration in at the lens stage. Not all fluorescent lights are the same, in color, gamut or light output.
    A few years ago I worked for on an architectural job, assisting the photographer. Even with digital capture, he requested the library(which had just undergone a major upgrade/modernization) ensure the bulbs were all the same. We ended up gelling the windows to balance the inside with the outside.

    -Dan

  3. #3
    pendennis's Avatar
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    Re: Ektar 100 INDOORS

    A FL-D filter can be of help, especially if the lights are of the "daylight" type.

    If a flash gets involved, use a green gelatin filter so the flash mimics fluorescent.

    It's nearly impossible, with a large room, to insure that the lights will all be the same; so you may end up with some compromise. However, I might tend to go with the scanning option. You can control the color yourself, and not rely on a printer (no slam at the printers, but they weren't at the event).

    Better yet, if you can get to the venue, try some test images with a digital camera.

    There are also a few web sites out there that let you set the balance in a digital camera, mimicking Ektra.
    Best,
    Dennis

  4. #4

    Re: Ektar 100 INDOORS

    Testing is not an option unfortunately. Would love to test and not need the snark I'm exposed to.

    Quote Originally Posted by pendennis View Post
    A FL-D filter can be of help, especially if the lights are of the "daylight" type.

    If a flash gets involved, use a green gelatin filter so the flash mimics fluorescent.

    It's nearly impossible, with a large room, to insure that the lights will all be the same; so you may end up with some compromise. However, I might tend to go with the scanning option. You can control the color yourself, and not rely on a printer (no slam at the printers, but they weren't at the event).

    Better yet, if you can get to the venue, try some test images with a digital camera.

    There are also a few web sites out there that let you set the balance in a digital camera, mimicking Ektra.

  5. #5
    Corran's Avatar
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    Re: Ektar 100 INDOORS

    I don't think anyone has been snarky above. If you can't test, you need to at least figure out what kind of lights there are. Fluorescent? Incandescent? Mercury vapor? LED? Once you have some idea about that, then I would suggest bringing the appropriate filtration, unless the lights used are close to daylight (unlikely). My experience with color negative film in artificial light with wonky color is not good, even through scanning. It can be worse or impossible if it's mixed lighting - one of the places I used to shoot in a lot was a performance venue with typical incandescent can lights - but also a few mercury vapor lights that played havoc with the lighting in those areas if they were on. So I always had to make sure they were off when shooting, even digital, or else the colors were terrible and impossible to get right without a lot of work in PS.
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  6. #6
    jp's Avatar
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    Re: Ektar 100 INDOORS

    I'd think it would be very difficult with Ektar's rich colors and sorta slide like contrast. Portra would still be challenging but easier with it's ability to do muted colors.

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