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Thread: Kodak HC110 Semi Stand For Scanning

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Brazil - Rio Grande do Sul
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    Re: Kodak HC110 Semi Stand For Scanning

    Just as a side note: you'll probably see a film speed gain - in stand 1:150 1 hr with Agfa Rodinal I had a +2/3 of film speed increase compared to N/normal development.
    I don't use HC-110 as a developer for semi or stand, as I find this developer too aggressive in highlights shaping, and grain structure - having a nice micro-contrast in shadows zone as a counter effect. The most successful combo for stand &semi-stand I had was with Agfa Rodinal instead. I usually use HC-110 for normal agitation and continuous agitation, a BTZS. If you have the time to search I have a dozen of photos with reduced agitation at my flickr page - https://www.flickr.com/photos/sallesrenato/

    Cheers,

    Renato

  2. #12

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    Oct 2013
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    Bow, NH
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    Re: Kodak HC110 Semi Stand For Scanning

    My 2 cents - I've only found edge effects to be desirable for tiny format negatives, rather than for LF, but to each his or her own.

  3. #13

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    Jul 2016
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    Re: Kodak HC110 Semi Stand For Scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by IanBarber View Post
    Interesting Pere, and a nice explanation.

    I know semi/stand has been discussed many times before and I was hesitant to even start the post but I am interested in the process and the more information I can gather from more experienced users, the more I will understand it.

    To be fair, I am printing no larger than 13x19 on an Epson 3880 printer so your comments regarding drum scanning is interesting. You mentioned Adaptative Contrast tools, anything in particular or just fine curves adjustments and masking.

    Sorry, I said adaptative and is Adaptive ( not native english )

    "is an excellent tool to lighten up shadow areas, which are too dark, without changing mid-tones and highlights. Thus, image details get visible in dark, low-contrast image areas that otherwise would remain hidden." , see sample images...

    http://www.silverfast.com/highlights/aaco/en.html

    This is only a commercial definition of it. But IMHO this is a wide concept of digital tools.

    There are a lot of commercial tools with that. Adjusting contrast locally is a major tool for all Image enhancing software.

    Some tools even recognize context. Man/Woman, Children/Yuong/Old, Race... Then it locates face, eyes, lips, cheek. Then it locally applies sharpening/softening algorithms, contrast, saturation, LUTs...


    Intelligent Adaptive Contrast may apply locally a sharpening algorithm with different radius and strength depending on detected structure. If it detects a fine texture it will sharpen strongly with suitable small radious. If it detects an out of focus area it will do nothing (it would increase noise) or even it can try to deliver a better bokeh.


    This can be made manually, imagine you have a portrait. Perhaps you will select eyes and sharpen it, while softening cheek. Also there is a cloth in the portrait with fine texture... you can apply there the right sharpening algorithm.


    Popular imaging enhancing software (Perfecty Clear, Instagram site) have a wide range of cooperative filters that work together, beyond tonal relationships it may apply optimal sharpening settings depending on the local context with the right radious.


    You can apply same sharpening for all image, of you can use regions and masks to apply different settings for each region. Automatic software can do that, often the way is undisclosed, you just have an slide: more or less effect !!


    Quote Originally Posted by IanBarber View Post
    Scanners
    In the Epson range IMHO it's worth to end using the V700 to V850 range. Then one must learn when a more expensive flatbed or a drum can make a difference or not.

    I concluded next, for me:

    1st priority: V700 to V850 do all machine

    2nd priority: dedicated roll film scanner, for 35mm only (120 scanner is too expensive for me, and not necessary)

    3rd priority: Use drum service for some slide shots with interesting deep shadows that no flatbed will read well.

  4. #14

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    Jul 2016
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    Re: Kodak HC110 Semi Stand For Scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R View Post
    ...
    I agree

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Collinsville, CT USA
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    Re: Kodak HC110 Semi Stand For Scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by IanBarber View Post
    Can you remember the article number, I would like to read this if I can still get a copy
    Main article at:

    http://www.tmax100.com/photo/pdf/devforscan.pdf

  6. #16

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    Jul 2016
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    Re: Kodak HC110 Semi Stand For Scanning

    Quote Originally Posted by djdister View Post
    My 2 cents - I've only found edge effects to be desirable for tiny format negatives, rather than for LF, but to each his or her own.
    Well, perhaps it depends more on the enlargement ratio than on format. Perhaps a 1m print form 4x5 may show some adjacency effect...

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