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Thread: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

  1. #1

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    Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    After using a number of devices to process my 4x5 sheets, I've come to the conclusion that the best processing device is that which allows me to process film using the least amount of chemistry. At present, I am using one of those nikor tanks that is capable of handling 12 sheets at a time. I like it, the downside is that it uses one liter of chemistry to do 12 or fewer sheets. What I'm looking for is some kind of device that comes in two sizes, one for small batches (6 sheets or fewer) and one for larger batches (over 6 sheets) that uses the least amount of chemistry. Does such a thing exists or is this just wishful thinking?

    Thanks.
    --Mario

  2. #2
    8x10, 5x7, 4x5, et al Leigh's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    Generally speaking, rotary processing (JOBO) uses less chemistry by far than any stationary method.

    You must ALWAYS use at least the minimum volume of concentrate specified by the developer manufacturer.
    So if a 100ml bottle is spec'd to develop 10 rolls of film, you must use 10ml for every roll being developed.
    This always applies to the volume of concentrate used, regardless of the dilution.

    A "roll" in this context is any combination of film that can be proofed on a single 8x10 sheet of paper.
    So that includes a 36-exposure 35mm roll, one 120 roll, four 4x5 sheets, or one 8x10 sheet.

    Here's the JOBO instructions for their smallest tank:
    Note that 270ml will do six 4x5 films. I added the red line at the top of the liquid level.



    HOWEVER...
    If you use a compensating developer in any rotary system, you completely lose the compensating effect.

    - Leigh
    If you believe you can, or you believe you can't... you're right.

  3. #3

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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    Keep it up and you'll eventually hit the magic answer just like the farmer who figured out a way to take care of his horse using ever less feed.
    The horse died.

  4. #4

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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    Mario,

    You may want to check this out:

    https://shop.stearmanpress.com/colle...cessing-system

    I have one (from the original Kickstarter campaign) and it works great using only 475ml of chemistry.

  5. #5

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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan9940 View Post
    Mario,

    You may want to check this out:
    Alan, I saw this one last week. Over here in San Francisco, the place where I go to print, Rayko Photo Center, they showed me one of these. Apparently they are going to start using them. Something to keep in mind. But the question is, do they have one for 12 sheets?
    --Mario

  6. #6

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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh View Post
    Generally speaking, rotary processing (JOBO) uses less chemistry by far than any stationary method.

    You must ALWAYS use at least the minimum volume of concentrate specified by the developer manufacturer.
    So if a 100ml bottle is spec'd to develop 10 rolls of film, you must use 10ml for every roll being developed.
    This always applies to the volume of concentrate used, regardless of the dilution.

    A "roll" in this context is any combination of film that can be proofed on a single 8x10 sheet of paper.
    So that includes a 36-exposure 35mm roll, one 120 roll, four 4x5 sheets, or one 8x10 sheet.

    Here's the JOBO instructions for their smallest tank:
    Note that 270ml will do six 4x5 films. I added the red line at the top of the liquid level.



    HOWEVER...
    If you use a compensating developer in any rotary system, you completely lose the compensating effect.

    - Leigh
    So, this is model 2521/2523 (why two numbers?) for six sheets of 4x5. Is there one for 12 sheets?

    Thank you.
    --Mario

  7. #7
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    Quote Originally Posted by macandal View Post
    After using a number of devices to process my 4x5 sheets, I've come to the conclusion that the best processing device is that which allows me to process film using the least amount of chemistry. At present, I am using one of those nikor tanks that is capable of handling 12 sheets at a time. I like it, the downside is that it uses one liter of chemistry to do 12 or fewer sheets. What I'm looking for is some kind of device that comes in two sizes, one for small batches (6 sheets or fewer) and one for larger batches (over 6 sheets) that uses the least amount of chemistry. Does such a thing exists or is this just wishful thinking?

    Thanks.
    What is the advantage of less solution? Why pursue the absolute minimum, which I believe SergeiR has found?
    sin eater

  8. #8
    KenS
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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    Mario...

    Over the past 60+ years I have used both tray and my much experienced Kodak 'hangers' in hard rubber tanks.

    Might I be allowed to direct you towards the BTZS developing tubes. I have been using the 'original' style grey tubes for developing both my 4x5 and 8x10 negatives for the past 18 years allowing me to use of a 'minimum' volume of my developer of choice.

    I started out with 'home-made' tubes using black ABS tubing from the hardware store. I feel that the less expensive home-made proved to 'me' that the concept worked.... and 'saved' me from excessive chemical 'waste'

    I then acquired a set of the BTZS-made "grey" tubes... and have nothing but "good" things to say about the system.. I get to process my films with a minimum to no 'waste'. While I now mostly prefer Pyrocat-HD developer, I have also used, with success... both D76 and HC110 in the tubes.

    That being said.... I have no experience with the 'newer' model BTZS tubes... but will and must admit that I would both hesitate and probably hate, having to 'go back' to tray and/or tank development of my sheet films.

    Ken

  9. #9

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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    I do one or two sheets at a time in Jobo 2521 and 2820 drums. As far as I can see they are physically identical. I use HC110B one shot with 45ml water/1.5ml HC110.
    With the film holder you do up to six sheets at a time in 270ml.
    Two film holders will fit in a 2551 drum allowing up to 12 sheets in 560 ml.
    Or a 3010 drum will do up to 10 sheets in 210 ml

    I think you can use them without the Jobo machine by spinning them in a sink of water like oversized BTZS tubes. I've not tried it myself
    You can't teach an old dog new tech's!

  10. #10
    Tim Meisburger's Avatar
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    Re: Devices for developing 4x5 with little chemistry???

    The most efficient is a Paterson Orbital tank, which can use as little as 70ml to develop four sheets of some film, and all paper. 70ml is not enough to give even development for some films like FP4, so for that you need to cut off the fins and use about 200ml. Use is one shot.

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