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Thread: loading 120 film onto reels for developing

  1. #1

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    I have done 35mm for years and will TRY 120 and 220 Black and White for the FIRST time but AFTER I get some help and advice from you fine people!! I have the Jobo adjustable reels and of course the tanks and chemicals...........So tell me about the'paper backing' ????????? Would this 120 be ok to do in a light bag?????????? I have to use what I have as things are tight!!!! So if you have time to go thru the loading process and ANY other hints and/or advice I would be GRATEFUL!!!!!!!! Thanks for your time and effort. I hope to do this, this weekend!!! Just put my new Durst M670 Color Kis Kit together and am looking forward to printing my FIRST 120 prints!! THANKS!!! steve

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Posts
    1,791

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    1) Adjust the reels for 120.

    2) I'm used to the 2500 type reels. Either raise the red tab if you intend to load 220 or two rolls of 120. Or make sure it's lowered if you intend to load only one roll of 120. If you're loading two rolls of 120 per reel then you'll need to lower the red tab after the first roll is all the way on. I guess you need to lower it for 220 to.

    3) Paper backing is taped at one end. Not a big deal. Just make sure you load the film and leave the paper backing off.

    4) I don't like bags. It's easier to use a closet at night if you don't have a darkroom.

    Have you used the reels for 35mm? If so it's basically the same other then the red tab and leaving the paper backing off.

    BTW 120 is medium not large. You might want to try www.apug.org

  3. #3
    Octogenarian
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Frisco, Texas
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    3,529

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    Steve,

    You might be able to get a wider range of responses if you post your question on the B&W Photography - Film and Processing Forum, at www.photo.net.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2001
    Posts
    4,590

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    It is a LOT trickier than 35mm. The problem is the film is so wide that it's easy to kink it, giving you little cresent moons in the negatives. My very best advice is to sacrifice a roll and practice, practice, practice in the light, then practice, practice. practice in the dark, until you get it right.
    Wilhelm (Sarasota)

  5. #5

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    I use Jobo tanks and reels mostly the 1500 series. When you pull the tape that holds the paper, fold it over and stick it over the end of the film - this helps to stiffen the film and the tape does not cause a problem with your chemistry. Next, bend the end of the flm back against the curl thats taken set, this will help you feed the film into the reel. If you do this just right you can actually push the film most if not all the way on the reel. Don't crimp it back just bend it enought to take the curl out.

    I also suggest using a closet or windowless bathroom instead of a changing bag. Put a towel at the bottom of the door to block the light. Test this by standing in the dark for a couple of minutes - if you still can't see light after two minutes, then you're good to go.

  6. #6
    Craigclu
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    41

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    With traditional wire reels, the biggest factor for me is in getting the alignment started correctly. Develop a feel for that aspect and the rest just falls into place. Again, practice on a donor roll until it becomes natural for you. Tell these guys it's for doing your 6X17 stuff and maybe they'll get off your back!

  7. #7

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    Steve,

    When I started using medium format b & w film I had the worst time getting the lead edge started on the reels. The fix is to trim off the lead edge corners just a little bit. Has worked fine for the past 15+ years.

    Your mileage may vary.

    ~)

    ~S.

  8. #8
    Terence
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    391

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    Am I the only one who found loading 120 easier than 35mm? At least it's large enough to actually get your fingers inside the reel to start the loading. Horensetin's book on Basic Black & White photography was a huge help to me when I started doing my own developing. Written at a very basic level, it is very easy to follow. And I agree that a dark closet or bathroom with a towel shoved at the bottom of the door is a way to go. Changing bags are a last resort for me.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Middletown, NJ - Land of the Living Dead
    Posts
    190

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    I find that 120 reels, be they stainless steel or plastic, are far easier to load than 35mm.

    Maybe it's just because I really don't like shooting in 35...

    hehehe

  10. #10

    loading 120 film onto reels for developing

    Steve,
    When you peel the tape off-do it slowly. You can get static "lightning" marks on your film. Especially in the winter when the air in your house is dry. It looks cool in the dark but can ruin your film.
    Matt

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