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Thread: Filter for red objects using FP4

  1. #1
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Filter for red objects using FP4

    I recently photographed a series on Meat and Bones, and the red meat did not record as I like on the film, whether I straight processed or solarized the film , basically no detail.

    What filter should one use to record detail in red objects, secondary question I will be using a Sinar and an old Century camera, I would prefer NOT to use the filter in front of
    the lens, would Lee or Roscoe filters inside at the back end of the lens be an issue??
    Where is the best location to place the filters?
    I am using tungsten hot lights if that matter not strobe so the original light is warm.

    thanks in advance

  2. #2

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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    I would expect maximum texture with a filter at the opposite of the color spectrum. So a green or perhaps a blue filter. But meat already being somewhat unsavory in appearance (my opinion), it may push things too far. I guess...experiment, as always.

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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    I agree, try med/deep green... Will darken reds a bit, and lighter textures should lighten, as most standard B/W films have a green sensitivity peak, the green component in the light reflects off the lighter areas building density, so it kind of produces contrast by lightening the whiteish areas, in reverse of deepening the blue shadow areas like many filters... Interesting effect...

    Steve K

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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    Bob,

    Are you trying to lighten or darken the meat, or just get more texture. Red/Orange will lighten, green will darken. You might even try an 80B or similar to just convert your tungsten light to daylight. It should darken red too. If it's just the texture, then maybe glancing lighting would help.

    As far as filters behind the lens: anything in the focused beam will change the plane of focus, so make sure to focus with the filter in place. Gels work well behind the lens, but a good coated glass filter will give good results too as long as the focus is accounted for.

    Best,

    Doremus

  5. #5
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    Hi Doremus

    I am trying to get more detail . I am using raking light from the side . I think Red/Orange is more to my liking as right now when I print a t bone for example the bone has tons of detail but
    the red meat just prints black so I want to lighten the red meat in the final print.

    I am using two different cameras for this one lens is a 480mm on an old camera and the other is a 210mm on sinar I believe which would require two really expensive lens filters and hard to find.
    I am leaning to lee or roscoe filters behind the lens or even large sheets in front of the light sources.

    I will focus with filters in place thats a good tip.

    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by Doremus Scudder View Post
    Bob,

    Are you trying to lighten or darken the meat, or just get more texture. Red/Orange will lighten, green will darken. You might even try an 80B or similar to just convert your tungsten light to daylight. It should darken red too. If it's just the texture, then maybe glancing lighting would help.

    As far as filters behind the lens: anything in the focused beam will change the plane of focus, so make sure to focus with the filter in place. Gels work well behind the lens, but a good coated glass filter will give good results too as long as the focus is accounted for.

    Best,

    Doremus

  6. #6
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Bone In.jpg 
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ID:	151519Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Hamburger .jpg 
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ID:	151520

    Here is two samples of where I am going.. Both cases the red meat is too dark and I want more detail.

  7. #7

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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    Have you tried giving it an extra stop of exposure and cutting your development time by 15-20%

    Sent from my X17 using Tapatalk

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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    Colors of low saturation are likely to be less affected by filters than you think. And of course 'red' meat is not actually a pure red like,say, a tomato or a Ferrari. I'd try a strong red filter, #25 or #29. But please post your results...

  9. #9
    bob carnie's Avatar
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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    These are solarized in development so all bets are off.

    Quote Originally Posted by brucep View Post
    Have you tried giving it an extra stop of exposure and cutting your development time by 15-20%

    Sent from my X17 using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Filter for red objects using FP4

    Placing filters behind the lens is not going to help with sharpness. Otherwise, hot lights are relatively warm color balance, so the film sees red especially red.
    Funny things also go on with meat due to the way hemoglobin handles light. An interesting effect of this is how meat counters use a special type of fluorescent
    bulb that makes hemoglobin fluoresce, so that the meat looks really red and fresh under the lights. But then when you get home and unwrap the meat, it looks
    gray and old. Welcome to Safeway! I really don't know what you're after. Just view through the filter first. A deep red filter might make it look almost white and
    be counterproductive to showing details like fat, gristle, and bone. Let's see... what was that cookbook Hannibal Lecter used?

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