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Thread: 4x5 developing tanks?

  1. #31

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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Google ssp45 Kickstart er project that looks good

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk

  2. #32

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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Deval View Post
    Google ssp45 Kickstart er project that looks good

    Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
    Just so there's no confusion...it's SP-445.

  3. #33
    fishbulb's Avatar
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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    And some, like the Combiplan can do everything but loading the film in full room light. Others, like the Nikor require complete darkness when changing chemistry and other might require complete darkness for all steps. Some like the Combiplan require as little space as a piece of 57 film for all steps, others might require the better part of a bench top or a sink.
    The Combiplan becomes a forced film washer by simply attaching a hose to the bottom connector. The others require that you get a film washer.
    Some clarification here... the Combiplan is good but it's not that different in how it's used versus other daylight tanks like Nikor, Patterson/Mod54, BW King, Yankee, FR, Jobo 2500 etc.

    1) These tanks can all do everything in full light except loading the film.

    2) These tanks aren't significantly bigger or smaller than a Combiplan.

    3) These tanks can also be used as a film washer, as long as you have a rubber hose that you can put into the tank.

    The exceptions to the above three points would be open-top tanks with hangars, tray processing, or tube processing.
    -Adam

  4. #34

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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Quote Originally Posted by fishbulb View Post
    Some clarification here... the Combiplan is good but it's not that different in how it's used versus other daylight tanks like Nikor, Patterson/Mod54, BW King, Yankee, FR, Jobo 2500 etc.

    1) These tanks can all do everything in full light except loading the film.

    2) These tanks aren't significantly bigger or smaller than a Combiplan.

    3) These tanks can also be used as a film washer, as long as you have a rubber hose that you can put into the tank.

    The exceptions to the above three points would be open-top tanks with hangars, tray processing, or tube processing.
    Obviously you have never used the Combi tank or, if you did, you did, you did not follow the directions. The Combiplan T tank is designed for inversion agitation with a specific amount of chemistry (printed on the inside top cover) that allows the chemistry to flow over the film so fresh chemistry is in contact with the film with each inversion cycle. The proper technique is to invert the tank and wait for the chemistry to stop flowing then reinvent it. Do this for as long as the recommended agitation time. Very few, if any, other tank used this system.
    Actually originally there were two different HP Combiplan or Gepe Combiplan or originally Krause Combiplan systems. One was the one that has been sold since 1983, the Combiplan T daylight system with all steps, except for loading the film, carried out in room light. The other was the Combiplan L system, discontinued in 1983, for use in a darkroom with multiple tanks, one for each chemical step. The L system did not have a light tight lid and was designed for people that wanted to use a rack type system. Until 1983 both were available in 45 and 57 sizes. In 1983 all 57 versions and the 45 L system as well as all Combiplan 35 and 120/220 systems were discontinued.

    Additionally all Combiplan T tanks were equipped with 2 light tight hose connectors that could simply accept standard push on hoses for washing, putting the hose into the tank and turning on water is not the safest way to wash film. The Combiplan allowed washing by connecting to either the hose connector in the top or to the one in the bottom. For the darkroom only version a simpler, non light tight hose connector screwed into the bottom of one side of the tank for washing in the tank.

    Again, that was not a possibility on any of the other tanks.

    Lastly, how would you change chemistry in room light with the Nikor, FR, Yankeetank? Sorry I have not seen the BW King tank.

    However I just visited their site and they print some caveats in their instructions. The most glaring was the following:

    "2. Developing fixing (recommended to operate under low light)". Obviously this is not like the Combiplan that operates in full room light. There was also a warning that since the film is strongly curved in there reel film in the tank for prolonged time could lose flatness. The Combi film rack keeps either sheet film or glass plates flat during all steps. There were other operational warnings regarding leakage.

  5. #35

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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    Lastly, how would you change chemistry in room light with the Nikor, FR, Yankeetank? Sorry I have not seen the BW King tank.

    However I just visited their site and they print some caveats in their instructions. The most glaring was the following:

    "2. Developing fixing (recommended to operate under low light)". Obviously this is not like the Combiplan that operates in full room light. There was also a warning that since the film is strongly curved in there reel film in the tank for prolonged time could lose flatness. The Combi film rack keeps either sheet film or glass plates flat during all steps. There were other operational warnings regarding leakage.
    Bob,

    I use my B&W King tank in full roomlight, in my kitchen, with bright sunlight bouncing off the white pool deck just outside my kitchen window; i.e., my kitchen is pretty bright during the day. Once it's loaded with film in the dark, I process just like I would with any 35/120 tank. I suppose that since the lid is designed such that the reel can be rotated with the cap, it might be possible for light to leak into the tank but I've never had any problem. As for leaking, I run a single layer of electrical tape around the cap/tank seam and never had a leak.

    The warning of film being strongly curved in the reel and losing flatness puzzles me. I typically load film into the reel and get the tank ready the night before I'm going to process. Sometime the next morning I process the film--so we're talking, say, 20 - 30 mins max for most developers I use--and then I wash the film off reel. So, the film is in the reel about 12 - 15 hours and it's always flat when dry.

  6. #36

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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan9940 View Post
    Bob,

    I use my B&W King tank in full roomlight, in my kitchen, with bright sunlight bouncing off the white pool deck just outside my kitchen window; i.e., my kitchen is pretty bright during the day. Once it's loaded with film in the dark, I process just like I would with any 35/120 tank. I suppose that since the lid is designed such that the reel can be rotated with the cap, it might be possible for light to leak into the tank but I've never had any problem. As for leaking, I run a single layer of electrical tape around the cap/tank seam and never had a leak.

    The warning of film being strongly curved in the reel and losing flatness puzzles me. I typically load film into the reel and get the tank ready the night before I'm going to process. Sometime the next morning I process the film--so we're talking, say, 20 - 30 mins max for most developers I use--and then I wash the film off reel. So, the film is in the reel about 12 - 15 hours and it's always flat when dry.
    Ask their web site why they made these comments in their instructions.

  7. #37
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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Bob, it's obvious that you are a Combiplan fan. We're just trying to correct the record on some of your statements on the other tanks. We are not criticizing Combiplan, which is a great product.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    Lastly, how would you change chemistry in room light with the Nikor, FR, Yankeetank? Sorry I have not seen the BW King tank.
    All the tanks operate under the same principle. There is an opening at the top where you dump chemistry in or out of the tank. It is light tight because there are folding layers of metal/plastic underneath that prevent any meaningful amount of light from traveling into the tank, while allowing liquids to flow. The idea is the same whether they are 135, 120, or 4x5 tanks.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    However I just visited their site and they print some caveats in their instructions. The most glaring was the following:

    "2. Developing fixing (recommended to operate under low light)". Obviously this is not like the Combiplan that operates in full room light. There was also a warning that since the film is strongly curved in there reel film in the tank for prolonged time could lose flatness. The Combi film rack keeps either sheet film or glass plates flat during all steps. There were other operational warnings regarding leakage.
    I have never found one that leaks light. I have used Nikor, FR, Yankee, Patterson and Jobo daylight tanks in full room light with no issues. I don't know why they say that in their instructions, except probably to hedge their liability.

    Whether the film comes out curved depends on the tank design. Tanks that hold film straight/ish (Yankee, FR, Mod54) will not curve the film much if at all. Nikor-type designs will curve your film but it flattens out again during the drying process.

    Personally, since I am scanning with a drum scanner (pressing the film against a curved drum with a sheet of mylar) I don't mind if it's curved. But it could be a concern for people using enlargers if they can't get their film to flatten out again.
    -Adam

  8. #38

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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Jobo 1st choice, Perfect, reels or expert tanks, any process etc.

    Short on funds (nearly free these days) 1/2 gal hard rubber tanks and hangers. I wouldn't try developing E-6 (These worked great with E-3 @ 75F)

    I had the Nikor sheet film tanks ... Sold @ a small profit, this is the best thing I can say about them. But they worked fine.

    Washing film is 10x changes of water. If you want to get rid of the purple dye in TMAX use sodium sulfite or Hypo Clear

    Every method described here works, I picked up a Jobo CPP2 w lift. I always thought these were silly back in the day. NOW I LOVE IT.

  9. #39

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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan9940 View Post
    Bob,I use my B&W King tank in full roomlight, in my kitchen, with bright sunlight bouncing off the white pool deck just outside my kitchen window; i.e., my kitchen is pretty bright during the day. Once it's loaded with film in the dark, I process just like I would with any 35/120 tank. I suppose that since the lid is designed such that the reel can be rotated with the cap, it might be possible for light to leak into the tank but I've never had any problem. As for leaking, I run a single layer of electrical tape around the cap/tank seam and never had a leak.
    The warning of film being strongly curved in the reel and losing flatness puzzles me. ... ...
    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    Ask their web site why they made these comments in their instructions.
    Thank you for your concern for B&W KING and discussed.
    B&W KING from design to finished product, I spent more than six years.Website is also my own editor.
    I itself is a photographer, to mechanical design, website design and I am not an expert, so there will be a mistake.
    In the product introduction of web site, I in "placement took cause damage to its flatness.", is a prompt "Placing the film into the tank core is only suitable for a short period of time".
    It now appears that this tip there is no need too much.As a professional photographer, it is not forgotten in developing the film to tin, placed a long time.
    Recently, I want to rewrite the English writings of the website, modify the error.
    In addition to start filming B&W KING developing tank installation operation video film, on the web site links, and send to the purchase and use B&W KING photographer friends from all countries, in order to correctly guide operation method, reduce mistakes.
    B&W KING is a new product, I hope that more countries photographer friends, to know it and love it.
    At the same time also wish you a photographer to use experience and critical feedback.
    thank you

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  10. #40
    bw-man's Avatar
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    Re: 4x5 developing tanks?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Salomon View Post
    Lastly, how would you change chemistry in room light with the Nikor, FR, Yankeetank? Sorry I have not seen the BW King tank.
    However I just visited their site and they print some caveats in their instructions. The most glaring was the following:
    "2. Developing fixing (recommended to operate under low light)". Obviously this is not like the Combiplan that operates in full room light. There was also a warning that since the film is strongly curved in there reel film in the tank for prolonged time could lose flatness. The Combi film rack keeps either sheet film or glass plates flat during all steps. There were other operational warnings regarding leakage.
    Bob Salomon
    B&W King website content have made changes."It to operate under low light", has been deleted.
    Some of the inaccurate, misleading, it is necessary to modify.
    Last edited by bw-man; 14-Jun-2016 at 03:34. Reason: amend

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