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Thread: Industar-37

  1. #11

    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    AZ
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    Re: Industar-37

    I'm with you there, I have a lot of cool old lenses with a history. One of my FED cameras, made in the NKVD (KGB) commune for orphan boys, was awarded to the civil engineer that rushed the completion of the Karkov railroad station, in front of the Nazis in WWII. It's engraved such on the bottom! I like that kind of history too.

    On aero recon use, I doubt it.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    27

    Re: Industar-37

    Found my answer!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #13

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    Dec 2001
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    NJ
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    Re: Industar-37

    That's probably an FKD, the lens could also be an I-51.

  4. #14

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    Re: Industar-37

    Well, now we know! But that dog must have had a hard time pulling the darkslide, without opposable thumbs.

  5. #15

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    NJ
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    Re: Industar-37

    Quote Originally Posted by goamules View Post
    Well, now we know! But that dog must have had a hard time pulling the darkslide, without opposable thumbs.
    LaIka was just along for the ride.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    79

    Re: Industar-37

    The Soviet Union really was a closed country for a long time. But it doesn’t mean that no goods at al was coming from outside. A lot of things was from other countries. But those goods not always was distributed equally o sold in the stores because of corruption and limited supply. It would be a long story and hard for me to explain here how the society was organized and lived in Soviet time. But just a little. All companies and factories used to belong to government. The managers was appointed and selected by the government to. So basically it was no owners. Everybody was working and used some equipment or machines at work, but not everybody really care about those equipment. If it broke the company will fix it or provide the new one. For example the photo shops was usually under local government jurisdiction. It was almost no officially working private photographers. Every photographers used to work in the publishing companies or in the local Photo Shops and equipment they use was given to them by the company. It is not like say in US, when you coming to work you very often must bring you own tools, at list hand tools. The main purpose of those Photo Shops was to provide photographic service to the public. So if I want to make a professional portrait I must go in the one of those photo shops. Government provide them with equipment and materials. Of course it was a lot of hobbyist like me, but I’m here talking about professionals and industry. If you are hobbyist you go in the photo store and buy staff you need. A lot of things was widely available for the hobbyist. I never had problems say with b&w film, paper o chemicals. Cameras was available to, but not all. For example It was hard to find a Zenith and Kiev. But FED, Zorykiy and some other rangefinders was often on the store shelves and not very expensive. Paper , chemicals enlargers was not expensive at all. Probably the most expensive enlarger for up to 6 x 9 mm. format cost about 40 ruble’s. My last enlarger was Crocus. This one never was in the store, but the official price wasn’t so big, only 100 ruble’s. I got it only with help from some people worked in the industry. In 70ties most of the cameras produced by Soviet industry was 35mm. For medium format 6x6 only two models was in production Kiev and Salut. Even this cameras I remember was in the stores. They used to be considered as a professional and not often used by hobbyists because of the high price. But in 70ties they was citing on the store shelves. Later in the 80ties things changed, still I don’t remember problems with b&w photo materials. To find materials for color work yes was more problematical but not for b&w. The large format cameras probably last time was in production in Soviet Union in 50ties and 60ties. Only one model was produced for the public Photocor. I never even see that camera. But I clear remember when I just started to play with photography in 70ties, I see in the store a glass plates for that camera. Nobody bye them usually because was no cameras available. What about Industar-37 and FKD. This is a kind of specific equipment which made in limited number for official Photo Shops. Every Photo Shop in the country was equipped with those kind of equipment and after that the production of this cameras and lenses stopped. That’s because they usually today very old and beaten. They was in hard use every day for many, many years and usually belongs to nobody except government. After collapse of the country, somebody probably saved them, and now when most of the things digital nobody need them and we can see them on line for sale from time to time. So if somebody find the new one it is probably just because it was stored and saved by some old Photo Shop worker for the future witch never come. And very possible that this old photographer already in the other world and new generation photographer find this lens and don’t have any use for it except to make some money.

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    27

    Re: Industar-37

    WOW!! Thanks R.K. for the detailed explanation, or should I say Russian photo history lesson. Truly fascinating. I guess a new one is particularly rare. The seller says it comes with all the caps, case and passport (whatever that is). Looking even more forward to mounting it on my camera. Hopefully it won't rip the front off it

    P.S.: Here's an example of what I meant.

    Click image for larger version. 

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  8. #18

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    Re: Industar-37

    Good to hear a first hand perspective. Instead of us just guessing!

  9. #19

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    Mar 2020
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    Italy
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    Re: Industar-37

    I resume this old tread.

    Question for who own this lens: will the fornt standard of the Chamonix 45N handle this lens in your opinion?
    I'm planning of buying one and use it without shutter for some indoor portrait shot at few seconds with the lens cap.

    Thank you
    Good photographs are gifts

    http://www.robertonania.com/

  10. #20

    Re: Industar-37

    Quote Originally Posted by Roberto Nania View Post
    I resume this old tread.

    Question for who own this lens: will the fornt standard of the Chamonix 45N handle this lens in your opinion?
    I'm planning of buying one and use it without shutter for some indoor portrait shot at few seconds with the lens cap.

    Thank you
    Roberto.

    I have an Industar-37 which I use on my Intrepid 8X10, which isn't meant to handle large, heavy lenses. The Industar-37 is quite heavy: 2.75 pounds, I believe. The flange would barely fit on a Linhof style 4x5 board if you could get a large enough hole in it, but it would look absurdly large on a 4x5 camera. Could it be done? Probably. Are you brave enough to try it??! Let's see!

    Paul

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