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Thread: Big Prints??

  1. #41
    Ginette's Avatar
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    Re: Big Prints??

    As I'm interested to big prints for my lumen project, I take a look at this G-12 brochure. Nothing there that you can imagine yourself as a device for cutting paper. Described as a basic set-up : a movable stop that will retain the end of the paper and set the length and a grooved cutting marker (two strips of metal slightly spaced) and a single-edged razor blade. The paper pass over the groove. Kodak suggest emulsion down.
    The brochure have 16 pages. Published in 1979 so will be in public domain here in Canada in 2029. If you really wish to look at, I can send you a pdf as a personnal copy but I will not publish it. PM me your email. In other way, it will be nice if Kodak can republish some of their old publications if requested.

    For myself, I have small roll paper (30") I lay the roll directly on the floor in my darkroom and use my very portable Logan mat cutter. With a long square arm and with the rail guide that you can lift to pass the paper easily under it, i found this is working better that a rotary cutter that you need to pass the paper under the blade guard (and anyway my rotary cutter have only 26").

    Thanks Michael for the pictures of your set up, very inspirating, you have a nice and big space. May I ask why you choose gutter instead of a large drain hole for the recuperation of the chemistries. I found some nice big pans (hydroponic stuff) but I still not drill them to make the drain, I don't know if I will put the drain under or on the side.
    My Lumen project http://ginetteclement.com

  2. #42
    Michael Wesik's Avatar
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    Re: Big Prints??

    Quote Originally Posted by Ginette View Post
    As I'm interested to big prints for my lumen project, I take a look at this G-12 brochure. Nothing there that you can imagine yourself as a device for cutting paper. Described as a basic set-up : a movable stop that will retain the end of the paper and set the length and a grooved cutting marker (two strips of metal slightly spaced) and a single-edged razor blade. The paper pass over the groove. Kodak suggest emulsion down.
    The brochure have 16 pages. Published in 1979 so will be in public domain here in Canada in 2029. If you really wish to look at, I can send you a pdf as a personnal copy but I will not publish it. PM me your email. In other way, it will be nice if Kodak can republish some of their old publications if requested.

    For myself, I have small roll paper (30") I lay the roll directly on the floor in my darkroom and use my very portable Logan mat cutter. With a long square arm and with the rail guide that you can lift to pass the paper easily under it, i found this is working better that a rotary cutter that you need to pass the paper under the blade guard (and anyway my rotary cutter have only 26").

    Thanks Michael for the pictures of your set up, very inspirating, you have a nice and big space. May I ask why you choose gutter instead of a large drain hole for the recuperation of the chemistries. I found some nice big pans (hydroponic stuff) but I still not drill them to make the drain, I don't know if I will put the drain under or on the side.
    I found that using a gutter underneath and several holes along the bottom of one end of the tray allowed for the chemistry to return to me faster and for the tray to drain much quicker during washing cycles. I only use 8 litres of developer, stop and fix for a 56x85 inch print. It's especially important to stop development quickly, for me, because I often use fairly fast developing times of between 1-1.5 mins to manipulate the colouration of my toning. Having the holes drilled right at the bottom of the tray ensures quick transitions between chemicals and as little chemical carry-over as possible. With the exception of my developer, I have the ability to reuse most of my chemicals (like fix for testing purposes) though I typically one-shot everything for the sake of consistency. Hope that helps!

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  3. #43
    Tin Can's Avatar
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    Re: Big Prints??

    What an interesting thread. Makes me look at panoramic enlargement in a new light...

    Long sinks.
    Tin Can

  4. #44
    Drew Wiley
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    Re: Big Prints??

    Hmmm. Our libraries are filled with all kinds of real photography books here. And this is the heart of techie land.

  5. #45
    loujon
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    Re: Big Prints??

    Oh yea BTW- It may not be EVERY single Kodak Publication but it has a bunch of them.

    Provided by the folks who make/made their living selling and instructing the photographic community about Kodak products.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...?pq-path=14472
    Last edited by Louis Pacilla; 27-Aug-2015 at 09:57. Reason: add

  6. #46
    Ginette's Avatar
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    Re: Big Prints??

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg Davis View Post
    And Ginette is correct about the device described in the Kodak paper. It is just a plywood board at an angle, but a flat counter top would work, too. The roll is held at one end with two strips if thin metal on the board (next to the roll) with a small gap between them to create a slot for cutting. Just use a regular utility knife. The lengths are measured by drilling two holes along the edge of the board, one on either side at the length you use regularly, so for example they may be at 30 inches from the cutting slot. A piece of wood is used as a stop with a dowel protruding from each end to slide into the matching holes. You just pull the paper until it stops at this piece of wood, then you cut along the gap between metal strips. Several holes can be made at different commonly used lengths and the stop moved as needed.

    The illustration shown in the document shows a wooden ramp with holes drilled down the face along the edges with the roll hanging in hooks on the back side. Personally I don't have space for this thing in my darkroom, and I found an 80" paper dispenser on eBay for very little money. I mounted it on the wall so I don't use any counter space.
    Someone asked so I scanned the document in pdf so feel free to PM to ask a copy, just give me your email, 16 pages 1.5meg document.

    Quote Originally Posted by Louis Pacilla View Post
    Oh yea BTW- It may not be EVERY single Kodak Publication but it has a bunch of them.

    Provided by the folks who make/made their living selling and instructing the photographic community about Kodak products.

    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/profe...?pq-path=14472
    Thanks for the link but the G-12 refer to another publication as said before.
    My Lumen project http://ginetteclement.com

  7. #47
    Ginette's Avatar
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    Re: Big Prints??

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Wesik View Post
    I found that using a gutter underneath and several holes along the bottom of one end of the tray allowed for the chemistry to return to me faster and for the tray to drain much quicker during washing cycles. I only use 8 litres of developer, stop and fix for a 56x85 inch print. It's especially important to stop development quickly, for me, because I often use fairly fast developing times of between 1-1.5 mins to manipulate the colouration of my toning. Having the holes drilled right at the bottom of the tray ensures quick transitions between chemicals and as little chemical carry-over as possible. With the exception of my developer, I have the ability to reuse most of my chemicals (like fix for testing purposes) though I typically one-shot everything for the sake of consistency. Hope that helps!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I saw the part over the tray, is it a kind of separator witch keep the solutions in the tray or that part cover the holes? Is it close tight? or do you simply inclinate the tray enough that the chemistry not escape from the several holes?
    My Lumen project http://ginetteclement.com

  8. #48
    Michael Wesik's Avatar
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    Re: Big Prints??

    Quote Originally Posted by Ginette View Post
    I saw the part over the tray, is it a kind of separator witch keep the solutions in the tray or that part cover the holes? Is it close tight? or do you simply inclinate the tray enough that the chemistry not escape from the several holes?
    With my one-tray process, I have the ability to either keep the tray flat and plug the draining holes with two rubber based plugs, or I can tilt the far end of the tray at a slight angle, remove the plugs and allow the chemistry to filter down into the gutter beneath - or I can do a combination of both. I use clamps to hold the plugs tight in place during bleaching, selenium, etc. There can be a small amount of leakage but it's the nature of this beast. I investigated several different plugging options but in the end I went with something really simply and easy to use. I don't use the clamps for washing, however. The leakage that occurs during washing actually makes for a more efficient wash as the water is pulled over and under the paper down towards the plugs.

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  9. #49

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    Re: Big Prints??

    A quick note to point out while he may be both short and short tempered, you would be hard pressed to find anyone more generous with their time and knowledge as Bob Carnie.

  10. #50
    runs a monkey grinder Steve M Hostetter's Avatar
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    Re: Big Prints??

    God bless everyone willing to spend time to explain their process especially Michael for the detailed pics and conversation!! This is very helpful indeed!! Although I'm finding out that I may not have quite the facility available to achieve the the size prints I had hoped for..��
    Thank you
    Steve
    PS please keep them coming !! This thread is very inspiring

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