Page 2 of 12 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 111

Thread: Blowing up a Kodak 2D to 12x20

  1. #11
    Drew Bedo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Houston Texas
    Posts
    2,939

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Roberts View Post
    Drew, as you can see, this is hardly a complete camera--no back, no bellows. If you haven't priced 2D parts, you might be surprised. From what I've seen each part--front standard, rear, spring back, base rail, extension rail, sliding tripod block, etc., is going for around $100, so it could easily take $600 or more, plus another $200 for a bellows, just to put together a 2D from parts.
    I am relieved. I was afraid that a camera that only needed bellows and a few screws was going to be dismembered.

    Baci in the last decade of the previous century, I picked up a 2D at the old Houston Camera Show for well below $300. I disassembled all the hardware and refinished the wod without stripping it. Left the hardware as-is and put it all back. Yes I have priced 2D parts and I am always surprised to see how much they part-out for. I am looking for a bargai- priced extension rail (an old guy dreaming).

    Hope this project works out well for you. Keep us informed.
    Drew Bedo
    www.quietlightphoto.com
    http://www.artsyhome.com/author/drew-bedo




    There are only three types of mounting flanges; too big, too small and wrong thread!

  2. #12

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wondervu, Colorado
    Posts
    1,185

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    Pierre,
    Keith Canham makes an 8x20 conversion back for his 8x10 cameras as well.

    I briefly thought about this option but, in the end, decided I would prefer stand-alone formats. Though I may add an 8x20 reducing back at some point.
    Last edited by Michael Roberts; 3-Nov-2014 at 12:50.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    3,668

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    Whew! What a relief.The title made me think you were going to put a stick of dynamite inside and explode it.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wondervu, Colorado
    Posts
    1,185

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    No, that would be in the LF Performance Art forum...

  5. #15
    LF/ULF Carbon Printer Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Washington
    Posts
    3,843

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    Michael, believe me when I tell you that you are right on with the price. The bellows is the major cost item as are holders. I built my first camera my 8x20 this way. I made new walnut pieces but used the metal etc.Came it at around 800.00. I just finished my 14x17 to 20x24 for about 700.00. Someone gave me a process camera bellows so all the parts I made and some I bought from Barry got me to that price. Good luck with the build.

  6. #16
    Green Hand pierre506's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Suzhou, China
    Posts
    851

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Roberts View Post
    Pierre,
    Keith Canham makes an 8x20 conversion back for his 8x10 cameras as well.

    I briefly thought about this option but, in the end, decided I would prefer stand-alone formats. Though I may add an 8x20 reducing back at some point.
    Michael,
    The 8x20 or 12x20 conversion back you wanna build is not the most headache problem. The cost of the bellows and the film holders( 3, at least) would be very very higher as Jim said.
    However, I also concern about your camera's rail. The original rail is short for 8x20 and 12x20.
    Sometimes love just ain't enough.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/pierre506/sets/

  7. #17
    LF/ULF Carbon Printer Jim Fitzgerald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Vancouver Washington
    Posts
    3,843

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    A harder thing to do if you are going to use the gears is having enough rack with the proper thread pitch. My experience tells me that they are all a bit different. So if this is a problem just replace it with gears and racks from McMaster Carr. The gears should fit the existing rod, you may have to drill them out. Not hard to do. I think they are pinned which is a good idea. Finding the back extension rail is not easy or inexpensive and then making sure the gears match is a crap shoot if it is not from the same camera. I think I have 36" of extension on my 8x20 I'd have to break it out to check. I find my most used lens on the 820 is my 360 MM Gerogon. Wide angle. Sharp and great coverage and cheap! I use the extension rail with my 21 1/4" Kodak Ektanon and 19" Artar. I will say that I get more people interested in my 8x20's than my other formats. That big rectangular format just draws people in. You don't see that many. Good luck.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wondervu, Colorado
    Posts
    1,185

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    Progress yesterday. Materials ready to be chopped and ripped: five 3" x 24" x 1/4" pieces of cherry for the rear frame and spring back; 3+ pieces of 1/2 x 1/2 x 24 basswood for the rear bellows frame; 1 piece of 5+" x 3/8" mahogany for the base to which the rear frame will be attached.

    New cherry 12x20 rear camera frame: o/s dimensions, 23 1/2 x 15 1/2 x 2 3/8 x 1/4.

    I was rushing to get the new rear frame and the old 8x10 rear frame over to the machinist who is going to stretch the rear tilt brass rod, so all those bits are with him now. He is also going to remove the rear standard hardware from the old frame. My secondary goal for the old rear frame is to leave it in usable condition for someone who has a need for it, e.g., to replace a broken or missing frame.

    Ripping the cherry for the rear frame left me with nice 1/2 x 1/4 pieces to use for the U-shaped film holder surround--a nice bit of serendipity.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 004 (600 x 450).jpg   008 (600 x 450).jpg  
    Last edited by Michael Roberts; 5-Apr-2021 at 07:23.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wondervu, Colorado
    Posts
    1,185

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    Pierre and Jim, I agree 30 inches of rail/bellows is not enough. Here's my planned solution:

    I plan to fabricate a new base--16 inches long, 9 wide--so I can detach the rear rail and slide the sections fore and aft to use the maximum 40 inch draw of the new bellows, and still be able to use the rack and pinion focusing of the original hardware and rail. Sort of like a Deardorff and other models with two rails, one that extends to the front and the other to the rear, with the camera's base section stationary in the middle.

    This base--like the rear rail--will be an accessory I will only need to use when I want to use a lens with more than 30" fl, e.g., the 760 APO Nikkor or the 36" Turner Reich lenses I have. I will put this base on the tripod head, screw it down, then set the 2D on top, attach the rear rail, rack the rear of the camera onto the rear rail, extend to the full 30", then unscrew the rear rail and slide it back to the full 40" of bellows, and lock down both front and rear rails to the wooden base. The base will have raised sides and hinged bits that will fold over the 2D rails to lock them down. The result will be a gap between the front and rear rails of 10" to extend the max distance from 30 to 40". Again, just like a Deardorff: front rail extends forward, rear rail extends backward, base stays put in the middle. The differences are my rails will be on the same plane (not stacked one on top of the other), and my base and rear rail are detachable.

    The reason for the 16" base is to allow 3" at front and rear to lock down the rails and support them so they are tight. If 3" is not stable enough, I can make the base longer, no big deal.

    At that point, I will be able to use the rack and pinion focusing from the rear--the original gears and track, no need to add any more or to add a new third rail. The extension will actually be a gap in the center, filled in by the new base. If I don't need the full 40" of bellows (say, to focus the 760 at less than infinity), I can also step around to the front and move the front standard in 5-10" before doing the fine focusing from the rear.

    If this isn't clear, at least it's clear in my head. Hopefully within a few weeks it will all be fabricated and I'll be able to post photos to show how it works. Not to mention, I'll actually be able to try this out and see if what I've dreamed up will actually work easily (well, relatively, given the camera size) in the field.

    One other thing: my favorite tripod is an old 1930s Ries with a nearly 6x7" steel head. I think the Ries will be able to hold this camera setup securely.

    Also, even though this all may sound very cumbersome, there will be times I will only need to use the front rail, e.g., with a Nikkor 450M or 15" Turner Reich. The 8x10 2D without the rear rail weighs only 10lbs. I don't expect the 12x20 to weigh much more--maybe 12. The rear rail is another 2lbs. The new wooden base may add another 2lbs. I expect this will be one of those cameras I won't use too far from the car but even so there will be a lot of possibilities. If I'm interested in a distant location, I can scout it out ahead of time and decide which accessories and lenses to leave behind to lighten the load.

  10. #20
    8x20 8x10 John Jarosz's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Fairfax Iowa
    Posts
    663

    Re: blowing up a Kodak 2D

    40" of bellows draw is important; especially if you plan to use it out west for landscape work. The downside of that is the camera begins to perform like a sail. You might think about adding a feature so that 2 tripods (or at least 1 tripod + a monopod) can be used.

    A 40" bellows will have some sag when fully extended. You'll need some kind of mid-bellows support so the bellows doesn't vignette the image.

    I wish I could justify a 36" long lens. The prices on those have sure skyrocketed in the last 5 years.

    Sounds like you've thought this out, good luck with the construction. Hope you don't mind the suggestions.

Similar Threads

  1. Ilford 500 Bulb Blowing Blues
    By Larry Kellogg in forum Darkroom: Equipment
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 14-Mar-2017, 14:49
  2. Kodak Portra 160 NC 12x20!
    By xaheadx in forum Darkroom: Film, Processing & Printing
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 18-Dec-2008, 09:17
  3. Blowing Quickloads
    By Scott Fleming in forum Gear
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 24-Apr-2005, 11:47

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •