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Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 12:20
Hi Everyone,

I have finally decided to get into 8x10 large format after turning down jobs from clients looking for larger images up to 72 wide, I think 4x5 would be pushing the limits for those sizes. I have set a limit of around $2000 so I can put more $$$ into the lens (150 and 300mm) and I prefer to buy new and these 2 models have caught my eye. The camera will be used for landscapes and it seems the Shen Hao seems to have more movements then the Tachihara but do I really need them all? If anyone has had on hands knowledge about the overall performances of ether one it would be very well appreciated in making a final decision...Thanks

Greg Y
2-Jan-2013, 12:36
Bostonartist, With your preset budget, and your plan to buy new, in my opinion, you are limiting your choices. For up to $2k I think you can do much better on the used market. As a long time large format user, I would much prefer a used Deardorff field camera or Sinar or Cambo monorail to either the SH or Tachihara. As far as lenses go, 150mm is a very wide (& expensive) choice on 8x10. I have seen some very fine large silver gelatin prints from 4x5 (albeit not 5ft long). If you are planning to scan & digitally print...well that's another story altogether. I've seen Jay Dusard's Monumental prints which are in that size range. At that size I would expect that the scanning & printing are well up the list in the factors affecting the quality of the output print.

Jonathan Barlow
2-Jan-2013, 13:29
Yes, a used but super clean Deardorff or Canham 8x10 field camera or Sinar P2 8x10 monorail would serve you better. As a point of reference, the Sinar P2 8x10 sold new in 2005 for over $10,000 but a mint used one can be bought today for under $2,000.

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 13:29
Greg Y......Why Deardorff? I keep seeing this come up on a lot of post and have always wondered what makes this a better option, also I do plan on on scanning and printing digitally. My impression on LF is that the $$$ should be in the glass and I do not mind spending extra for that....the reason I want 150mm is that looking at what I shoot on my FF camera many times it is in the range of 150mm in a 8x10. I did look at the Cambo mono rail and was interested in the option that camera would give to do micro and portraits if the opportunity for that ever came up.

Lachlan 717
2-Jan-2013, 13:38
Yes, a used but super clean Deardorff or Canham 8x10 field camera or Sinar P2 8x10 monorail would serve you better.

Based on what?

Jonathan Barlow
2-Jan-2013, 13:42
Based on what?


Quality. Design. Resale.

Ken Lee
2-Jan-2013, 13:43
What kind of photos ? Do they necessitate a folding wooden field camera ? A bunch of holders and a tripod will weigh more than the camera.

Maris Rusis
2-Jan-2013, 13:52
I have and use both 8x10 Tachiharas, the double extension and the triple extension models. In the last twenty years I have encountered no faults. For landscape work the camera movements have never approached the design limits. At the present time a Tachihara double extension 810GF runs a tad over $2000 brand new direct from Tachihara.

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 13:58
Thanks Maris.....for landscape I would think the double extension would be better. Midwest also has the GF priced at $1900

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 14:13
What kind of photos ? Do they necessitate a folding wooden field camera ? A bunch of holders and a tripod will weigh more than the camera.

Ken...do you have suggestions, I saw your post from 2004 on the comparison of these 2 and the deardorff. The photos will be color transparency 75% of the time, will start off with b&W, I would think folding so it could be packed....I am not worried about weight unless it get past 80lbs, I am condition right now for 80lbs on my back.

vinny
2-Jan-2013, 14:29
Turning into this week's "which 8x10 camera should i get?" thread.

Lachlan 717
2-Jan-2013, 14:39
The photos will be color transparency 75% of the time...

Have you checked availability of 8x10 colour transparency lately?

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 14:40
Turning into this week's "which 8x10 camera should i get?" thread.

Just looking for some experience insight on 2 cameras I have narrowed down to....if someone has other suggestions I would not mind hearing from them, but give me specific reasons, not general.

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 14:52
Have you checked availability of 8x10 colour transparency lately?

Its still out there, limited but still there. I actually started purchasing some last week to stock pile in the freezer. If it dries up, I just have to switch to negatives.

Ken Lee
2-Jan-2013, 15:10
Ken...do you have suggestions, I saw your post from 2004 on the comparison of these 2 and the deardorff. The photos will be color transparency 75% of the time, will start off with b&W, I would think folding so it could be packed....I am not worried about weight unless it get past 80lbs, I am condition right now for 80lbs on my back.

Sorry my question was vague: not what kind of film, but what kind of subject: portrait/landscape/architecture/still life ? What location: mountain top ? studio ? desert ? jungle ? city ?

Those are some of the factors which should determine your choice of equipment: camera, tripod, lenses, etc.

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 15:39
Sorry my question was vague: not what kind of film, but what kind of subject: portrait/landscape/architecture/still life ? What location: mountain top ? studio ? desert ? jungle ? city ?

Those are some of the factors which should determine your choice of equipment: camera, tripod, lenses, etc.

Ken....I shoot landscapes. Coastlines on East and West coast, everglades in Florida, Death Valley, Utah canyonlands,....overall everything in the landscape genre. I know wind is the enemy on some of those locations with the bellows. But when I can I want the ability to shoot 8x10 when I can. My FF has served me well but want the option to go large. I spent years as a landscape painter and switch to photography after meeting a well known photographer while painting at a location, I always thought this format was a natural progression for me once I started shooting.

Brian Ellis
2-Jan-2013, 16:49
For landscape photography I think either would do fine. Other than price and weight, both of which I'm sure you know, there isn't a huge difference between the two cameras in 8x10. We're not comparing a Bender to a Sinar here. But I'd probably go with the Shen if the approximate $300 price difference doesn't bother you, mainly for the bag bellows, the shift movement, and axis tilt, none of which the Tachi offers I don't think. The extra flexibility of a bag bellows can be useful when using a lens as short as the 150mm you mention and with an 8x10 camera the ability to refine a composition with shift rather than having to move the tripod around is nice. The difference between base and axis tilt isn't that big a deal but I find axis a little easier to use.

I think the Tachi would serve your purposes too, the differences aren't all that great and I liked the Tachiharas I've owned, they're nice, simple, relatively light (double extension model), easy to use, simple to set up and take down, cameras with movements more than adequate for landscape photography. But to me the Shen is a little more camera for a little more money.

As between the two models of 8x10 Shens, I'd get the FCL810A for the longer 650mm or so bellows but I used lenses longer than your 300mm with my 8x10 cameras. If you're sure that 300mm is the longest you'll ever use the TFC with its 450mm bellows would work though I'm not sure exactly how close it would focus, someone else can provide the formula for determining that if it matters to you.

I should add that I've owned both a Tachihara and Shen in 4x5 but not in 8x10 (though I've used other 8x10 cameras and have fiddled around with an 8x10 double extension Tachihara). Someone who's actually used both would be in a better position than I am to make a recommendation and could no doubt point out subtle differences between them that I don't know about or inaccuracies in anything I've said. But so far I haven't seen anyone like that respond here and I am very familiar with the 4x5 versions of both so I thought some response was better than none at all.

Good luck, 8x10 is a great format and a real pleasure to use. It was by far my favorite as among 4x5, 5x7, and 8x10.

BradS
2-Jan-2013, 18:12
a couple of observations:

1) is the Tachihara really still available new here in the US? I didn't think it was. Personally, I think the "gold plated" metal work on the Tachihara looks awful. I wish they had used real brass.

2) the 8x10 double extension Tachihara is a wonderful camera and will do every thing you need. I had one, my only real complaint with it was that the focus movement is only on the front standard. Not a big deal if you have really long arms and good close focus vision. I have long arms but, I have poor eyes and so had trouble with the Tachihara. The Chamonix with its lead screw focus mechanism would have been a better choice for me but I really do not like the Chamonix (this is just my personal bias - it is a fine camera).

3) I've had a few 8x10 cameras....Deardorff, Tachihara, Kodak 2D. The Kodak 2D was the best of the three for my purposes. Unfortunately, it is getting difficult to find an 8x10 Kodak 2D in decent condition these days. Same goes for the Deardorff. I've given up on 8x10 but, I think if I were going to give it a go again, I'd be looking at a used Cambo or Toyo Monorail or possibly a Shen Hoa HZX810....If I had a bunch of money burning a hole in my pocket, were I tempted to buy new, I'd get the Canham metal 8x10 or maybe even hold out for the Ebony RW810.

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 18:35
For landscape photography I think either would do fine. Other than price and weight, both of which I'm sure you know, there isn't a huge difference between the two cameras in 8x10. We're not comparing a Bender to a Sinar here.
Good luck, 8x10 is a great format and a real pleasure to use. It was by far my favorite as among 4x5, 5x7, and 8x10.

Thanks Brian....this the type of feedback I was looking for.

Bostonartist
2-Jan-2013, 18:43
a couple of observations:

1) is the Tachihara really still available new here in the US? I didn't think it was. Personally, I think the "gold plated" metal work on the Tachihara looks awful. I wish they had used real brass.

2) the 8x10 double extension Tachihara is a wonderful camera and will do every thing you need. I had one, my only real complaint with it was that the focus movement is only on the front standard. Not a big deal if you have really long arms and good close focus vision. I have long arms but, I have poor eyes and so had trouble with the Tachihara. The Chamonix with its lead screw focus mechanism would have been a better choice for me but I really do not like the Chamonix (this is just my personal bias - it is a fine camera).

3) I've had a few 8x10 cameras....Deardorff, Tachihara, Kodak 2D. The Kodak 2D was the best of the three for my purposes. Unfortunately, it is getting difficult to find an 8x10 Kodak 2D in decent condition these days. Same goes for the Deardorff. I've given up on 8x10 but, I think if I were going to give it a go again, I'd be looking at a used Cambo or Toyo Monorail or possibly a Shen Hoa HZX810....If I had a bunch of money burning a hole in my pocket, were I tempted to buy new, I'd get the Canham metal 8x10 or maybe even hold out for the Ebony RW810.

BradS......observation 1. Midwest is selling them on their website
observation 2. I am 6'5'' so the long arms are there for the front focus
observations 3. Thanks for the other suggestions, the monorail does intrigue me.

BradS
2-Jan-2013, 22:25
BradS......observation 1. Midwest is selling them on their website...

They only show the 4x5 mdel as in stock...but even that is good news. I thought that tachihara had disappeard from the domestic market. Given that you have long arms, and if you don't mind the gold colored metal works (don't be fooled, it is not brass...only kinda brass colored), then I think the Tachihara would be an excellent choice.

I suggest that you add your location to your profile information...it is helpful.

ic-racer
2-Jan-2013, 22:40
Hi Everyone,

I have finally decided to get into 8x10 large format after turning down jobs from clients looking for larger images up to 72” wide, I think 4x5 would be pushing the limits for those sizes. I have set a limit of around $2000 so I can put more $$$ into the lens (150 and 300mm) and I prefer to buy new and these 2 models have caught my eye. The camera will be used for landscapes and it seems the Shen Hao seems to have more movements then the Tachihara but do I really need them all? If anyone has had on hands knowledge about the overall performances of ether one it would be very well appreciated in making a final decision...Thanks

The Shen-Hao is a 'Phillips' style, whereas the Tachihara is more a 'Deardorff' style. The advantage of the 'Phillips' style is partly the back. It has a solid hinge like a non-swing back, but it also swings with a clever locking mechanism designed by Dick Phillips. So, it can be made lighter than the other and still be very solid. I'd get whatever you are used to using. When I got into 8x10 my friend had a Phillips, so I went with that style.

BradS
2-Jan-2013, 22:52
The Shen-Hao is a 'Phillips' style, whereas the Tachihara is more a 'Deardorff' style. The advantage of the 'Phillips' style is partly the back. It has a solid hinge like a non-swing back, but it also swings with a clever locking mechanism designed by Dick Phillips. So, it can be made lighter than the other and still be very solid. I'd get whatever you are used to using. When I got into 8x10 my friend had a Phillips, so I went with that style.

Careful IC...Shen Hao make at least three different styles of 8x10: the FCL, the HZX and the TFC. The FCL810 is the one you're referring to. The Shen Hao HZX810 is similar in design to a Deardorf or Ebony RW810 and the TFC...well, I guess it mimics one of the Ebony non-folding designs.

Bostonartist
3-Jan-2013, 04:54
So what client is going to pay for you to experiment and learn how to shoot a new 8x10 outfit when you've never used a view camera? You don't have to name names but I am trying to imagine what sort of client would be this generous? I can't imagine....

In any event, you probably should work backwards from your output - testing and comparing files and prints from various combinations. 8x10 chromes are not necessarily the ultimate media, and even if they are, once you factor in all the expenses - bracketing, scanning, testing, editing, printing - they still may be out of reach or so expensive that you won't make any money. Then again, there is a semi-famous Italian photographer who shoots landscapes with 11x14 Portra who makes a few million a year....

You might save yourself a lot of money, time, headaches if you hire a good photographer for a day and go out with them, play art director and learn using with their gear, do a few shots, buy a drum scan, work with the files, make a big print... sort of test it out.

Gittime.....They will be a learning curve to this new format for me, that's understood. But in a years times while learning how to the use the 8x10 and everything that goes with it....then "a client will pay me". There is a market for this I know and I am committed to make a go with it, I am trying trying to pick a 8x10 within my budget, then I will purchase some excellent glass to go with it, then I will get a decent drum scanner. I am willing to experiment and learn this craft because down the road it will pay off.....So Gittime if you got some solid points to say about the pros and cons of the above mention models, then give them to me.

Cletus
3-Jan-2013, 06:11
I have the Shen Hao FCL 810 A and a Sinar F2 8x10. I bought the Shen Hao new from Badger Graphics and I haven't touched the Sinar since I got it. Many here are loyal to Deardorff and I'm sure for good reason. I've never used a Dorff but I've seen them up close and in my humble opinion, camera design has come a long way since Deardorff was king.

The Shen FCL810 is a beautiful camera. Period. As rigid as can be expected at its considerable full extension - probably more so than my Sinar F2 at less than half the weight. Wind is a challenge, but I don't think there's an 8x10 out there that is 'windproof'. The quality of construction, finish and design is utterly beyond reproach IMO and there's NOTHNG "Made in China" seeming about it, although "MiC" isn't as much of a liability these days as it used to be.

All in all it's a very nice, very high quality camera with much more modern and...just more, features than a Deardorff. I know there are those here who will likely flay me for saying that, but I truly beleive it and not just because I happen to own the Shen Hao. In fact, I could have got the Shen or the Chamonix (another excellent Chinese maker) and I chose the FCL for reasons other than the $1000 lower price than the Chamonix.

Good luck in your decision, but I can tell from experience that the Shen Hao would probably not be a purchase you'd regret.

neil poulsen
3-Jan-2013, 08:08
. . . the reason I want 150mm is that looking at what I shoot on my FF camera many times it is in the range of 150mm in a 8x10 . . .

Out of curiosity, what do you use on your full-frame camera? To what dimensions do you typically print.

vinny
3-Jan-2013, 08:09
4x5 speed graphic and whatever lens comes with it.
$15 a pop plus $10/sheet processing doesn't make much sense to learn on and the $300 you spent on the 4x5 kit when you decide LF isn't for you will be much easier to swallow. With one 8x10 transparency film left and the remaining 8x10 color film that's left, you'll be shooting 4x5 color (if you can get it processed) shortly anyway.

read this thread:http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?96476-8-x-10-quot-camera-for-architecture-photography

Tim Meisburger
3-Jan-2013, 08:40
Brad, off topic I know, but yes, the Tachiharas are available from Midwest. I just bought a 4x5, as I wanted a new wooden folder in a traditional design and that was the only one available. I like it a lot, but yes, the anodized simulated brass metal is disturbing...

Bostonartist
3-Jan-2013, 12:26
The Shen FCL810 is a beautiful camera. Period. As rigid as can be expected at its considerable full extension - probably more so than my Sinar F2 at less than half the weight. Wind is a challenge, but I don't think there's an 8x10 out there that is 'windproof'. The quality of construction, finish and design is utterly beyond reproach IMO and there's NOTHNG "Made in China" seeming about it, although "MiC" isn't as much of a liability these days as it used to be.

Good luck in your decision, but I can tell from experience that the Shen Hao would probably not be a purchase you'd regret.

Thanks Cletus, for the review on the FCL810...I am leaning towards this model, I have seen some reviews that back up what you say. I have talked to Jeff @ Badger and he concurs too.

Bostonartist
3-Jan-2013, 12:39
Out of curiosity, what do you use on your full-frame camera? To what dimensions do you typically print.

Hi Neil,
I have the Canon 5D Mark II and my WA is the Zeiss 21mm f2/8, which the 150mm on the 8x10 is close to in 35mm terms I think. I max out at 24x36 with this set up.

ic-racer
3-Jan-2013, 15:37
Careful IC...Shen Hao make at least three different styles of 8x10: the FCL, the HZX and the TFC. The FCL810 is the one you're referring to. The Shen Hao HZX810 is similar in design to a Deardorf or Ebony RW810 and the TFC...well, I guess it mimics one of the Ebony non-folding designs.
Thanks for pointing that out, Brad. Times are good now for buying an 8x10 camera. A few years ago when I bought my FCL810, they had stopped HZX production and TFC was not available yet.

aluncrockford
5-Jan-2013, 05:45
Having used both the Sinar, Tachihara and deardorff 10x8 I would suggest that a second hand Deardorff will serve you best, one of the reasons is they are robust fairly light and very instinctive to use, they can also be used with wide angles without a lot of fuss, the Tachihara will struggle with a 150, though to be honest the widest angle that will cover at infinity as far as I am aware is a symmar 165 which is an absolute beast of a lens , you might well be safer looking at a 210 or 240 with a 360 or 480 as a optional lens, the 300 is slightly wide on a 10x8 and the difference between the 240 and 300 is marginal.

The other reason for heading down the rout of second hand is that there is less concern about bumping and denting a old Deardorff, as it almost certainly will have a few to start with

Bostonartist
5-Jan-2013, 09:44
Having used both the Sinar, Tachihara and deardorff 10x8 I would suggest that a second hand Deardorff will serve you best, one of the reasons is they are robust fairly light and very instinctive to use, they can also be used with wide angles without a lot of fuss, the Tachihara will struggle with a 150, though to be honest the widest angle that will cover at infinity as far as I am aware is a symmar 165 which is an absolute beast of a lens , you might well be safer looking at a 210 or 240 with a 360 or 480 as a optional lens, the 300 is slightly wide on a 10x8 and the difference between the 240 and 300 is marginal.

The other reason for heading down the rout of second hand is that there is less concern about bumping and denting a old Deardorff, as it almost certainly will have a few to start with

Thanks aluncrockford.....a few other members suggested the Deardorff but without specific reasons why. The WA is a must in my style and I have heard good reviews on the symmar 165 and the prices on ebay for them are not outrageous for me. I am was planning to start off with the 150(maybe 165) and then with the 300mm and add a 210mm down the road. I will research further about the Deardoff...Thanks

Brian Ellis
5-Jan-2013, 11:31
Thanks aluncrockford.....a few other members suggested the Deardorff but without specific reasons why. The WA is a must in my style and I have heard good reviews on the symmar 165 and the prices on ebay for them are not outrageous for me. I am was planning to start off with the 150(maybe 165) and then with the 300mm and add a 210mm down the road. I will research further about the Deardoff...Thanks

Deardorffs are wonderful cameras, I've owned two of them. The reason I wouldn't recommend one for you is that you'd be buying used and the camera would be anywhere from roughly 40 years old to roughly 80 years old. For amateurs like me that's o.k., if the camera needs to be repaired we can send it off to Richard Ritter or someone else, then get it back in a matter of weeks or months without suffering any loss of business. But I had the impression you're doing commercial work so not having a camera available for any length of time might be more of a problem for you. So it seemed to me you were better off with a new camera.

As for why Deardorffs are popular, assuming you get one in good condition they're well made, solid, about as precise as any wood camera gets, easy to open, set up, close, and take down, just really easy, comfortable cameras to use without being too heavy (as 8x10s go). While they don't accept a bag bellows I used a 156mm lens with mine with no problem. They also lack shift which is a little inconvenient with an 8x10 camera but not an insurmountable problem. Still, if I was a commercial photographer buying today I'd rather have a new camera than a used camera given comparable prices.

Bostonartist
5-Jan-2013, 12:12
[QUOTE=Brian Ellis;974655] But I had the impression you're doing commercial work so not having a camera available for any length of time might be more of a problem for you. So it seemed to me you were better off with a new camera. /QUOTE]

The 8x10 will be for commercial work but due to the learning curve I do not expect to have any quality work to give to a designer for awhile. I just hate to pass up $$$$ because I do not have this art form in my repertoire. I suspect it will take me a year to have this down to make some $$$$. The WA is a must and looking at some Ytube videos on the subject it differently interest me....I am leaning towards the Shen Hao new, but will research some more on the Deardorffs.

Maris Rusis
5-Jan-2013, 15:03
The Tachihara 8x10 cameras, even the triple extension model, can accommodate wide angle lenses if the lens panel is slipped out of the vertical guides of the front standard. A lens I regularly use is the Schneider Super Angulon 121mm f8 which covers 8x10 (just!) and can be tilted (but not shifted) using the remaining flexibility in the bellows.

Louis Pacilla
5-Jan-2013, 15:23
I suspect it will take me a year to have this down to make some $$$$.


That should be embroidered into a linen oval, framed and hung.

Your funny Gittime.:)

Bostonartist
5-Jan-2013, 16:37
The Tachihara 8x10 cameras, even the triple extension model, can accommodate wide angle lenses if the lens panel is slipped out of the vertical guides of the front standard. A lens I regularly use is the Schneider Super Angulon 121mm f8 which covers 8x10 (just!) and can be tilted (but not shifted) using the remaining flexibility in the bellows.

Thanks for the infor.

Bostonartist
5-Jan-2013, 16:45
That should be embroidered into a linen oval, framed and hung.

I know that has been said before and I knew when I was typing it I expected a response like that.....but to all fairness with the dedication and commitment to the art of photography I expect that I will be doing that (and spending mucho $$$ in learning and experimenting) by 2014 and beyond with large format. Its all about the focus and determination to create a art form. btw....I am full time photographer currently looking to add this format to my resume.

Gary Tarbert
5-Jan-2013, 17:07
Hi , I have an 8x10 Tachihara i only use for B&W , I shoot all my colour work on a Chamonix 5x8 will get to 72 inches (9X enlargement)so eqivalent to45 inches on 5x4 ,you get two shots on a 8x10 sheet ,more usable lenses, better DOF than 8x10 ,lighter than 8x10 ,Need i go on , I thought i would use the 8x10 for colour but i reach for the chamonix every time . Cheers Gary

Bostonartist
5-Jan-2013, 20:05
Hi , I have an 8x10 Tachihara i only use for B&W , I shoot all my colour work on a Chamonix 5x8 will get to 72 inches (9X enlargement)so eqivalent to45 inches on 5x4 ,you get two shots on a 8x10 sheet ,more usable lenses, better DOF than 8x10 ,lighter than 8x10 ,Need i go on , I thought i would use the 8x10 for colour but i reach for the chamonix every time . Cheers Gary

Hi Gary.....Just went on the Chamonix website, the 5x8 looks like a Beast, made out of hard maple. I bet you can get a Schneider Super Angulon 90mm on that too. How do you trim your 8x10 sheets? Very interesting indeed!

Gary Tarbert
5-Jan-2013, 20:39
Not the 90 on a flat board anyway (not sure it will cover anyhow)But i use a nikkor 120 a lot on it ,works well without bag bellows . I have modified a paper trimmer and use a harrison tent to cut films . Cheers Gary

Noeyedear
6-Jan-2013, 03:11
I know I'm pointing out the obvious, but 5x8 is a lot different shape to 10x8 and if 5x8 will do why not 5x7. At least you can buy film off the shelf that fits without the problems of cutting in the dark. Does 10x8 or 5x8 fit better with how you see a composition?
Kevin.

Bostonartist
6-Jan-2013, 04:13
I know I'm pointing out the obvious, but 5x8 is a lot different shape to 10x8 and if 5x8 will do why not 5x7. At least you can buy film off the shelf that fits without the problems of cutting in the dark. Does 10x8 or 5x8 fit better with how you see a composition?
Kevin.
I thought of that Kevin too afterwards.....I worry about 5x7 due to the lack of color film.

Bostonartist
6-Jan-2013, 04:16
Not the 90 on a flat board anyway (not sure it will cover anyhow)But i use a nikkor 120 a lot on it ,works well without bag bellows . I have modified a paper trimmer and use a harrison tent to cut films . Cheers Gary

I read a review last night on the 5x8 and you are right....120mm is the max for WA.

Gary Tarbert
6-Jan-2013, 06:23
I know I'm pointing out the obvious, but 5x8 is a lot different shape to 10x8 and if 5x8 will do why not 5x7. At least you can buy film off the shelf that fits without the problems of cutting in the dark. Does 10x8 or 5x8 fit better with how you see a composition?
Kevin.You are right it is a different aspect to 8x10 , for a lot of my landscape work i realy like the aspect far better than almost square,it is excellent for semi panorama work crop 1/2 inch top and bottom and you have a very workable 2to 1 ratio , But it is not for all . Cheers Gary

Lachlan 717
6-Jan-2013, 12:30
I know I'm pointing out the obvious, but 5x8 is a lot different shape to 10x8 and if 5x8 will do why not 5x7?
Kevin.

It is the closest format to the Golden Ratio.

Lachlan 717
6-Jan-2013, 12:41
I read a review last night on the 5x8 and you are right....120mm is the max for WA.

The Schneider 110mm SSXL will work.

The Fujinon 105mm f8 SW will work.

The Rodenstock 90mm f4.5 should work stopped down.

The Schneider 90mm SAXL will work.

The theoretic diagonal is just under 240mm; however, taking into account holder interference, you need about 230-235mm diagonal.

Have a look at this (http://www.ebonycamera.com/articles/lenses.html) if you need details of coverage.

mandoman7
6-Jan-2013, 16:29
I'm still hung up on the idea that projects are lost due to the inadequate resolution of 4x5. Usually very large prints are viewed at a distance and if so, the resolution required is surprisingly low. The camera choice seems secondary to me to the basic question of whether the larger format is warranted for the stated objective.
I say this while I am in fact shooting 8x10 for a client presently, but not for the resolution as much as DOF characteristics. But it's a bear dealing with that format, and not always warranted.

Bostonartist
6-Jan-2013, 16:33
It is the closest format to the Golden Ratio.

That's one of the best points I have heard yet.

mandoman7
7-Jan-2013, 11:31
Your clients are insisting on the golden ratio?

Bostonartist
7-Jan-2013, 12:28
Your clients are insisting on the golden ratio?

No they are not, I know an interior designer that has clients in building management of office buildings in Boston. I was asked to supply images to fit spaces up to 72" and maybe more, these image will be able to be seen up close. I could not do these with my FF in those sizes....thus my search to go into large format. I have always enjoyed the golden rule ratio coming from a past life as a landscape painter and I have lost some good sales from the designer because of the lack of doing larger images. If I do go for the 5x8 (golden rule) its because I think it would be more eye pleasing to more potential customers. Right now I am torn between the 8x10 and the 5x8, with the 8x10 I can crop to any size within the sizes above, vs. the 5x8 that has a "built in" natural aspect to the human eye, dating back for centuries and the obvious cost reduction of cutting 8x10 in half (specially since I will ruin a few films during the learning curve)

Fred L
7-Jan-2013, 13:24
Pretty sure Ed Burtynsky works (or has) in 4x5 and his large prints are definitely not lacking in detail, among other things. I know he's used mf digital for recent work (Oil Sands) so not sure if 4x5 is still part of his workflow. I don't think there will be *that* much to be gained from moving up to 8x10, from 4x5. ymmv

John O'Connell
7-Jan-2013, 20:04
I'm still hung up on the idea that projects are lost due to the inadequate resolution of 4x5.

Yeah. Me too. I in fact don't shoot 4x5 anymore, but I don't use 8x10 for additional resolution: I don't think there is any additional resolution. You might gain a small decrease in grain, but 8x10 film enlarged nine times still shows grain.

Plus the OP stated that s/he wants a 150mm for 8x10, which makes me wonder if s/he will be satisfied with the wide angle options in 8x10. If you want something wider than 150 you don't have decent options, and if you want something between 165 and 210 you have, as far as I know, a single lens that just hits the corners.

It seems like the real solution here is a panning rig and some stitching software for the Canon.

Bostonartist
8-Jan-2013, 05:14
It seems like the real solution here is a panning rig and some stitching software for the Canon.

Thanks John....I do stitch with the RRS pano rig, but I have never been real happy with the results. If you compare film against against a digital stitch image at a larger size film always wins out as far as I am concern. I had the opportunity to talk to a well known panoramic photographer about this at his gallery last winter and we compared his stitched images with his film images and there was a difference.

dperez
8-Jan-2013, 10:35
If you are thinking of doing macro, you might want to look more seriously at a used Sinar as mentioned by others. Rear focus would be a plus for Macro work. Most wooden cameras only offer front focus, it's not impossible, but it does make life easier at macro distances. Also, I'm not sure how a 150 would do as a portrait or macro lens; I'm thinking that it would not be an ideal focal length for either purpose.

-DP


Greg Y......Why Deardorff? I keep seeing this come up on a lot of post and have always wondered what makes this a better option, also I do plan on on scanning and printing digitally. My impression on LF is that the $$$ should be in the glass and I do not mind spending extra for that....the reason I want 150mm is that looking at what I shoot on my FF camera many times it is in the range of 150mm in a 8x10. I did look at the Cambo mono rail and was interested in the option that camera would give to do micro and portraits if the opportunity for that ever came up.

Bostonartist
8-Jan-2013, 12:19
If you are thinking of doing macro, you might want to look more seriously at a used Sinar as mentioned by others. Rear focus would be a plus for Macro work. -DP

Would you suggest the Sinar F2 then.

tenderobject
23-Mar-2013, 13:29
Hi bostonartist! What did you end up getting? Shenhao or tachihara? I'm in the same league right now but i'm torned between deardorff and shen hao. Atleast these two would fit on my budget if i look for used i just need to wait. :)