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View Full Version : DIY 8x10 Film Washer Project



Jay Decker
28-Dec-2012, 22:22
Processing 8x10 film in JOBO 3005 drums is a joy. But, it is boring to wash film in drum. And, I just can't bring myself to pop for a film washer. So, I turned to the information source that guided my entry into LF photography, Ken Lee's tech page (http://www.kenleegallery.com/html/tech/index.php). About two-thirds of the way down the page you will find Ken's solution to 4x5 and 5x7 film washing, the dish rack film washer (http://www.kenleegallery.com/html/tech/dishrack.php). With inspiration from Ken's website, I started to work on a solution for 8x10 film. After a trip to a couple office supply stores and a pet supply store and about $45 out of pocket, here what I've ended up with...

Photo 1: First Prototype Components, a plastic hanging file box, a file sorter, a tray siphon (given to me by someone), a small clap to hold the siphon in place, and an aquarium air system (pump, air stone, tubing, tubing holders, and check valve)

http://webpages.charter.net/monkeytumble/film_washer/photo1.JPG

Photo 2: Assembled Prototype in Operation

http://webpages.charter.net/monkeytumble/film_washer/photo2.JPG

Photo 3: Surface turbulence from the tray siphon and aquarium air system

http://webpages.charter.net/monkeytumble/film_washer/photo3.JPG

Photo 4: Side view depicting the file sorter loaded with waste 8x10 film and aquarium diaphragm pump

http://webpages.charter.net/monkeytumble/film_washer/photo4.JPG

Keith Pitman
28-Dec-2012, 22:34
Here's a link to the washer I made for 7x17 film:

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum187/47616-7x17-custom-film-washer.html

evan clarke
29-Dec-2012, 05:05
Thanks, I just bought two tray siphons and will make an 11x14 washer!..Cheers, Evan Clarke

William Whitaker
29-Dec-2012, 05:22
Keith,

The thumbnails on your APUG post don't enlarge for those of us who do not have APUG subscriptions. Perhaps you could post them here, too.

Greg Davis
29-Dec-2012, 10:43
You may want to put in a few drops of food coloring and see how long it takes to become 100% clear so you know how long it takes for a complete change of water.

Keith Pitman
29-Dec-2012, 17:39
The thumbnails on your APUG post don't enlarge for those of us who do not have APUG subscriptions. Perhaps you could post them here, too.[/QUOTE]


Here you go:

Jay Decker
29-Dec-2012, 17:47
You may want to put in a few drops of food coloring and see how long it takes to become 100% clear so you know how long it takes for a complete change of water.

The blue tint of the water in photos show just that test... About 5 minutes to clear the water.

ROL
30-Dec-2012, 11:52
Keith,

The thumbnails on your APUG post don't enlarge for those of us who do not have APUG subscriptions. Perhaps you could post them here, too.

Keith has obliged you, but since this is the second reference to APUG subscription I've run across in as many weeks, I must point out that I've been an APUG member since 2005 and the thumbnail links worked fine for me. While other pay for play facilities are not available to member only status, perhaps you just need to register with APUG at that level to see them?


Jay, do the racks not scuff the film's emulsion as it moves around a bit in its softened state?

Jay Decker
30-Dec-2012, 16:39
Jay, do the racks not scuff the film's emulsion as it moves around a bit in its softened state?

Haven't noticed any yet. I put sheets in at diagonal with the emulsion side up. The thicker film bases don't move much if at all. The ends of the thin base films gently wave in turbulence. I need to get a film box or two's worth of experience...

Ari
30-Dec-2012, 18:28
Jay, I like your film washer a lot; kudos!
Simple, easy to make, readily available materials...what's not to like?

Jay Decker
30-Dec-2012, 21:02
Been working on a few ideas to make this washer more effective. I'll share what I find works after I get it dialed in a couple days.

Randy
5-Jan-2013, 17:52
I may be wrong, but for many years now I have not washed my film with any other method other than filling up the container with clean water and letting the film soak for about 10 minutes, then dump, refill, shuffle the film, repeat. I do this for about 60-90 minutes. No running water. Since I process large format in trays, I just let them soak for 10-15, dump and refill. Obviously it saves on water. Roll film just soaks in their tanks, no running water. I have yet, after about 20 years of doing it this way, gotten any indication of staining. Thoughts?

Ari
5-Jan-2013, 18:27
I may be wrong, but for many years now I have not washed my film with any other method other than filling up the container with clean water and letting the film soak for about 10 minutes, then dump, refill, shuffle the film, repeat. I do this for about 60-90 minutes. No running water. Since I process large format in trays, I just let them soak for 10-15, dump and refill. Obviously it saves on water. Roll film just soaks in their tanks, no running water. I have yet, after about 20 years of doing it this way, gotten any indication of staining. Thoughts?

Sometimes I do that as well, but I've obtained similar results (no hypo stains), after a similar amount of time (20 years), by washing film in running water for five minutes.
There is always some contraption involved for water to enter, and heavier, fixer-laden water to exit, but wash time has always been about 5 minutes.
Same goes for RC prints.

Ken Lee
5-Jan-2013, 19:03
I just let film soak for 30 minutes, change water and soak a while longer. When you use an alkaline fixer, much less washing is required, and when there is no hypo, there is no need for hypo-clear.

Diffusion is our friend.

Ari
15-Feb-2013, 16:37
Jay, any news and/or improvements to the 810 washer?