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slackercruster
15-Nov-2012, 07:42
Color imaging dye stability tests are complete. You can view results here:

http://slackercruster-tests.tumblr.com/

Eastman Kodak's fabled dye transfer print comes in near the bottom. Very poor showing. Would have posted the results to the Yahoo Dye Transfer group...but Ctein got them to ban me.

Fuji, you are to be commended. Your Crystal Archive paper has shown to be the finest Type C color paper ever made for dye stability.

slackercruster


PS: I was hesitant about coming back here to post the results. I was run out of this group from the closed minded members and abusive mods. During my short stay here I was treated very poorly.

But...I did promise you the results of the dye stability tests. And personal prejudices aside, I have kept my promise to you...Semper Fidelis

marfa boomboom tx
15-Nov-2012, 08:03
Color imaging dye stability tests are complete. You can view results here:

http://slackercruster-tests.tumblr.com/

Eastman Kodak's fabled dye transfer print comes in near the bottom. Very poor showing. Would have posted the results to the Yahoo Dye Transfer group...but Ctein got them to ban me.

Fuji, you are to be commended. Your Crystal Archive paper has shown to be the finest Type C color paper ever made for dye stability.

slackercruster


PS: I was hesitant about coming back here to post the results. I was run out of this group from the closed minded members and abusive mods. During my short stay here I was treated very poorly.

But...I did promise you the results of the dye stability tests. And personal prejudices aside, I have kept my promise to you...Semper Fidelis

you know that there are 3 forms of fade/shift?


Bob and the rest of us from those halcyon days did.

marfa -- alone star --

Leigh
15-Nov-2012, 08:23
Eastman Kodak's fabled dye transfer print comes in near the bottom.
We should accept your opinions as opposed to those of countless users and viewers over several decades for what reason?

- Leigh

Greg Davis
15-Nov-2012, 08:38
Could you explain your testing procedure a little more in depth? Were the prints protected from the environment in any way? Were they under glass while exposed to sunlight, etc.? I appeciate the effort you put in so far with this test, but I would like a few more details. Thank you.

Drew Wiley
15-Nov-2012, 09:39
I can make almost any color photo medium fade in a less than a week, even the ones that
might remain vibrant for a lifetime under sensible care.

neil poulsen
15-Nov-2012, 11:28
This is really interesting. What surprises me is the stability of some of the inkjet prints.

photobymike
15-Nov-2012, 12:01
This is really interesting. What surprises me is the stability of some of the inkjet prints.

Actually i was not surprised at the stability of inkjet.... Epson inkjets.... i have done my own tests and found that the claims by epson are really good. Of course i would not be around in a hundred years. Full sun exposure with glass and without is very surprising to me after 3 years on my porch.

Brian C. Miller
15-Nov-2012, 12:10
Oooooh, tough crowd! Breaking Tiffen filters against the chair legs already!

Come on, guys, take a look at the results before trying to hang him from a tall tripod. It's a pretty basic test, and I wouldn't say that it's scientific, and it is a good indicator. I read a NYT article mentioning Mr. Wilhelm, and he indicated that fading numbers shouldn't be regarded as absolutes.

Drew Wiley
15-Nov-2012, 12:18
Basically, this all has to be taken with a grain of salt. The test parameters were hardly objective, and starting with old photographs in the first place, and comparing them to
modern samples, is hardly fair. For those of us who have decades of dealing with this kind
of issue under real-world parameters, as well as for those who have attempted an actual
science of dye and pigments, it's an extraordinarily simplistic level of testing. Might be fine
per his personal objectives, but in the final analysis, testing things in either the direct UV
of sunlight or an accelerated aging torture chamber is not going to give representative
results comparable to real world storage and display. A little knowledge can be dangerous,
as the saying goes...

SpeedGraphicMan
19-Nov-2012, 11:38
Basically, this all has to be taken with a grain of salt. The test parameters were hardly objective, and starting with old photographs in the first place, and comparing them to
modern samples, is hardly fair. For those of us who have decades of dealing with this kind
of issue under real-world parameters, as well as for those who have attempted an actual
science of dye and pigments, it's an extraordinarily simplistic level of testing. Might be fine
per his personal objectives, but in the final analysis, testing things in either the direct UV
of sunlight or an accelerated aging torture chamber is not going to give representative
results comparable to real world storage and display. A little knowledge can be dangerous,
as the saying goes...

Wow, somebody other than myself has some actual experience with this stuff!

Cheers to you Drew!