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J.Davie-S.
1-Jul-2011, 09:50
This forum has been treasure of help in the past. I wonder if anyone can give me some food for thought in my search for a new camera. I know there are endless posts about this question but askers usually are to vague. I'll try to be more specific.

I own a Toyo 8x10 monorail and it's very bulky. I'm looking for a more portable camera to take into the field but heavy enough that it's not going to blow over or shake when I release the shutter. Although I'm not familiar with field cameras I think they're my best option. I would like a camera that has the widest range of movements, plus I'm interested in doing close up work so I also need something that has long bellows capability. (I'm not a technical wiz so focal length to bellows extension confuses me).

Deardorff view cameras seem to be tried and true but I'm not sure how long the bellows can extend. I know that 32'' bellows are standard and they're able to extend about 28" if using the movements. Also Deardorff doesn't have back movements. Is that typical for field cameras?

Does anyone have some advice for me. I would really appreciate it.

Thanks,
Joseph

lenser
1-Jul-2011, 09:53
If you are looking for a clam-shell type, you would do well to take a look at the Kodak Master. Made in the 1950's and still a wonderful folding metal unit with extremely long bellows, full range of movements, fairly light weight and easy portability. Many of us here use them and comments are almost universally in favor. In fact, they are popular enough that a few people still manufacture lens boards.

Also available are 5x7 and 4x5 reducing backs.

William Whitaker
1-Jul-2011, 09:55
...Deardorff doesn't have back movements.

Not true. The Deardorff V8 (the 8x10 field camera) has rear tilt and swing as well as rear focus.

E. von Hoegh
1-Jul-2011, 09:55
The Deardorff V8 has rear tilt and swing. Front rise/fall, tilt and swing. The bellows are 30"
Early V8s have no front swings, as well as no serial number.

I'll second the KMV. I'd love to have one.

J.Davie-S.
1-Jul-2011, 10:11
Thanks for clarifying about the Deardorff's rear movements. I'll look into the KMV's specs. Not sure how readily available for purchase they are.

J-

Juergen Sattler
1-Jul-2011, 10:48
Take a look at the Wehman camera - it is very sturdy, packs up into a neat package and is very, very durable. Just take a look on Wehman's website for specs.

E. von Hoegh
1-Jul-2011, 11:47
Thanks for clarifying about the Deardorff's rear movements. I'll look into the KMV's specs. Not sure how readily available for purchase they are.

J-

They're fairly common; they show up here from time to time. The Calumet C-1 is nice, too.

Also, the Deardorff has "double" front rise. There is a rising/falling panel on the front standard, in addition to the front standard rise. Handy when you already have the front tilt set where you want it or need a bit extra.

Daniel Stone
1-Jul-2011, 12:13
They're fairly common; they show up here from time to time. The Calumet C-1 is nice, too.

Also, the Deardorff has "double" front rise. There is a rising/falling panel on the front standard, in addition to the front standard rise. Handy when you already have the front tilt set where you want it or need a bit extra.

The KMV does as well(double front-rise). The little screw mechanism on the top of the front standard allows another 1-1.5" of rise, and aboud 3/4" of fall once tilt is set. I just traded my KMV for a Hasselblad setup, since I'm now the proud owner of Calumet C1. Owning both cameras simultaneously was a very good experience, and allowed me to finalize a decision to stick with the C1. For ME, I loved the plain rock-solid stabilty of the C1 vs the KMV, especially with longer, heavier lenses, or with longer extensions with close-ups.

Both the C1 and the KMV are terrific cameras IMO, however, two totally different designs. The KMV is much faster to set up, however, the C1 won me over, simply for its "solid as a rock once set" design, vs the KMV's design. Having a 3/8-16 screw to attach the camera with also helped assuage any doubts of further instability vs a 1/4-20 screw.

-Dan

Mark Sawyer
1-Jul-2011, 12:32
I have a KMV, and it's a wonderful camera. It's two drawbacks: if you have a very heavy and long lens, like a big Petzval, it will torque on the front enough that you have to watch for it inducing front tilt. (Same with the Deardorff.) And the KMV has those weird lensboards. If you have a lot of lenses, you should either find a way to make your own, (others have, and you can do a search here for help), or convert it to a standard 6x6 lensboard. The conversion isn't terribly difficult if you're fairly handy at woodwork.

DJG
1-Jul-2011, 13:05
Take a look at the Wehman camera - it is very sturdy, packs up into a neat package and is very, very durable. Just take a look on Wehman's website for specs.

I really like my Wehman, but it seems like within the last month or so, he's got this notice at the top of his page:

"The Wehman Field Camera is no longer in production. Warranty, repairs, and accessories will continue to be supported."

ljsegil
1-Jul-2011, 15:14
I'm very happy with the Canham 8x10. It has front base and axial tilt, swing, rise and fall, and rear base tilt, swing and shift. The rear standard comes forward with short lenses so there is no problem with getting the camera in your wide angle shots. It has 36" of bellows and is quite stable (I use some 4+ lb vintage lenses on it and can shoot nicely with a 30" Red Dot Artar) but it is not overly heavy at 9.4 lbs (per Keith's website) for the standard model. Has reducing backs for 4x10, 5x7, and 4x5, or you can swap the rear standard for ULF or various sizes if your ambitions increase in size. Takes Sinar boards, though Keith will customize a front standard for whatever you like. His service is outstanding. Highly recommended if you want a more modern camera than some of those being discussed.
Larry

Juergen Sattler
1-Jul-2011, 15:16
Wow, I had no idea that Bruce was no longer manufacturing the Wehman 8x10 camera - very sad development.

TheDeardorffGuy
2-Jul-2011, 10:22
I sent you a private message.
Ken


This forum has been treasure of help in the past. I wonder if anyone can give me some food for thought in my search for a new camera. I know there are endless posts about this question but askers usually are to vague. I'll try to be more specific.

I own a Toyo 8x10 monorail and it's very bulky. I'm looking for a more portable camera to take into the field but heavy enough that it's not going to blow over or shake when I release the shutter. Although I'm not familiar with field cameras I think they're my best option. I would like a camera that has the widest range of movements, plus I'm interested in doing close up work so I also need something that has long bellows capability. (I'm not a technical wiz so focal length to bellows extension confuses me).

Deardorff view cameras seem to be tried and true but I'm not sure how long the bellows can extend. I know that 32'' bellows are standard and they're able to extend about 28" if using the movements. Also Deardorff doesn't have back movements. Is that typical for field cameras?

Does anyone have some advice for me. I would really appreciate it.

Thanks,
Joseph

John Kasaian
2-Jul-2011, 19:28
Deardorff is the bee's knees IMHO.
You might look for a Tachihara triple extension, although the prices might be not too far from that of a good usable 'dorff so it might be more of a choice between new and nice or used & classic. I had a KMV once, it was a nice camera but I found the Deardorff more suited to my tastes.

johnielvis
2-Jul-2011, 19:46
dude---zone vi cameras are IT....first view camera I ever bought--an 8x10 z6---still got it an will never sell---I may buy another---theres a NICE one at the calumet chicago store for like 1800 bucks last time I was there---that's what you want I guarantee. I want to buy it---I got the less heavy ultralight with slight longer bellows but less nice metal hardware...but still very happy...untill I saw the beauty of the regular z6 810...I kind of want it, but I got one you know....and mine works...used to it...the other would only be window dressing....or "just in case"..

I'd get that one--I've been looking at it every time I go there.

johnielvis
2-Jul-2011, 19:49
OH---I do LIKE canham too..buy NEW in my opinion and you will be proud owner forever...forget buying ANYTHING you don't fondle in your own hands and check everything first...picutres DO deceive...particularly buyers that want to see what they want to see published by buyers that want you to see what they want you to see.

venchka
2-Jul-2011, 20:00
You just missed a Tire Kicking test drive with Richard Ritter and his cameras. I made the mistake of picking up a Ritter 8x10 in one hand and my Zone VI 4x5 in the other. The 8x10 felt a lot lighter. Great camera. I know two owners. They both rave about the camera. I have made it a point not to get too close. I might start selling stuff to buy one.

jeroldharter
2-Jul-2011, 21:23
I have a Wehman and really like it for cost, weight, durability, full features, asymmetric rear swing, compactness/portability. But they are no longer made.

If I were to buy a new camera, I would seriously consider a Ritter at the top of the list. You should buy the "Owner's Manual" video for his ULF cameras to get a good idea of the cameras. Really impressive. Plus it is 25% lighter than my Wehman which is just 50% the weight of the Toyo that I had.

http://www.lg4mat.net/LFcamera.html

Ole Tjugen
3-Jul-2011, 21:21
I know I'm not going to find anything better than I have. I've looked at several other makes, in all sizes, and nothing comes close.


Gandolfi "Precision" 10x8".

Noah B
4-Jul-2011, 20:09
I bought a Wista 8x10 a few months back as my first 8x10 and I love it. Takes Sinar boards and is fairly lightweight. I'm unsure how easily available they are, but I think mine is terrific. I've thought about selling it to get a V8, but then there's the hassle of new lensboards etc. A friend of mine has a Canham and loves it, just depends on how much you want to put into it all.

J.Davie-S.
5-Jul-2011, 15:06
thanks to everyone for the opinions posted. You've given me a lot to consider and plenty to research. I certainly know where to begin now.

Joseph

joica
21-Jul-2011, 06:06
If you want to buy a steady metal 8x10 field camera , I recomend wildness III, I use it now.
you can get information here http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?t=77911&page=3

Ray Van Nes
21-Jul-2011, 07:56
To answer the last comment. Bruce had some health issues and has decided to retire from building cameras but will respond to requests for accessories. I just had him make a 5x7 adaptor back for me.

Raidahl
17-Aug-2011, 11:51
Okay Sinar C 8x10" is coming, now I was wondering, should I keep my Sinar F1 or should I buy Sinar 8x10 to 4x5 reducing back. Im not very familiar with those. How do they work. There are couple of those backs for sale on ebay, but I can not figure out how it works. Where in earth I put the film holder??? I can not see any spring mechanism on those.