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Fragomeni
24-Aug-2010, 02:45
Looking for educated input that comes from personal experience that is...
I am interested in taking a leap and burying myself in 8x10. I have been doing a lot of reading on the different cameras available and frankly there's just too much information out there. What I am looking for is the perfect camera (and lenses)...for me :) I will use it in the field as well as in studio (more field then studio though). It will be used to capture everything from landscape to portraits to table top. I would like to have as full a range of movements as is possible both in front and back so that I have the most versatility and function possible at my disposal. I am in love with old cameras (antiques/vintage) and the energy they carry with them so finding a camera that will make me feel right is important as odd as that may sound but I dont know if any of the older cameras can offer me what I am looking for (but it seems that some can). I am guessing that I'll lean toward wood because I plan to carry it and backpack a lot. I have been looking at Deardorff quite a bit but I need more specific info on the models and which ones, if any, have what I'm looking for.

From your experiences, please share with me your input on the vintage and modern cameras (wood and other materials) that I should be looking at and which ones fit the criteria that I am looking for. Also, input on lenses with the "ideal" camera would be very much appreciated.

(For those of you out there who will need to over emphasize the point that the "perfect camera" is specific to the individual, I know that. I am asking for opinions on what others, with experiences that may relate to what I want to do, feel would be best for me.)

As usual, thanks so much for your help everyone.

Bruce Barlow
24-Aug-2010, 03:17
Richard Ritter's 6.5 pound 8x10. 35" of bellows for tabletop and closeup. More movements than you'll ever need, extremely lightweight for backpacking, Sinar or Deardorf lensboards, Richard's support should you need anything custom.

Maybe not perfect, but awfully, awfully good.

John Bowen
24-Aug-2010, 03:37
I own 8x10 cameras from Wisner, Zone VI and Richard Riter. The Ritter gets all the use, the others serve a back-ups/collect dust...nuff said!

http://www.lg4mat.net/LFcamera.html

Best of luck in your quest,

Clive Gray
24-Aug-2010, 03:39
Many will say stay away from them but if you truly want a camera that can do everything don't dismiss the idea of a monorail system camera.

If you are inclined towards something vintage you might like to consider a Sinar Norma or for greater flexibility an modern F2 although the 10X8 F2 would be a harder to backpack.

If you like wide angle landscapes consider the Nikon 120SW no movements but about the widest you can go and still reasonably priced and just about available, the next step up is the 150-165mm range all of these need large centre filters and none are inexpensive Nikon 150SW 150mm f5.6 Schneider Super-Symmar XL Rodenstock Grandagon 155mm f 6.8. For moderate wides the old 58mm filter ring Fuji 210w is a great lens and a lot cheaper than the rare Rodenstock 210w none of the slightly older 240 lenses has huge coverage but they do cover and the Schneider Symar s can be quite cheap newer lenses with wider coverage are available but at a price. For normal lenses 300mm and 360mm Symar s and Rodenstock Sironar n's are relatively cheap as they are huge and not many people want then more expensive but lighter lenses of Teslar designs are available in the Nikon and Fuji ranges.

If you do consider a Sinar camera also consider the Sinar shutter as it's a great path to cheap lenses as the db mounted lenses it uses often go for a song also if you want to try the older strange portrait lenses that are popular in these parts but are usually in barrel it will make your life easier.

What I consider perfect or at least usable you might not but hopefully there are some ideas there which might be useful

Frank Petronio
24-Aug-2010, 05:03
You may decide that backpacking and having a solid, versatile camera are at odds with each other. Some people have a heavier camera for studio work, or use the heavier camera gear and move it around using a baby stroller or SUV.

Also the weight of the 8x10 system as a whole is greater -- the film holders quickly outweigh the camera itself -- and what good is an expensive ultra-light camera if you can't carry enough film to be satisfied with your shoots?

Which is why you see very few 8x10s continued to be backpacked after people try it.

Walter Calahan
24-Aug-2010, 05:10
No one camera does it all.

I recommend buying quality used gear to save on cost. I'm not saying my camera is the best for what you want to do, others here have suggested quality gear to consider, but when I was looking for a camera, I picked up a KB Canham 8x10 Lightweight model. Have never looked back regretting the purchase. Keith Canham stands behind his cameras, even if you purchase one used.

Regarding backpacking with an 8x10 system get a 3-wheeled jogging stroller to roll your equipment instead of carrying it on your back.

MIke Sherck
24-Aug-2010, 06:03
I agree with Walter: I don't believe that there is any one camera which can be proven to all observers to be superior to all others. That said, you say you like older cameras, so you might be happier with a wooden field camera. Deardorff's are well thought of and are certainly available in the marketplace in condition from 'abominable' to 'nearly new.' Tachihara makes a very nice looking 8x10 wooden field camera in both double and triple extension models at reasonable prices. Keith Canham still makes his unique 8x10 wood field model, I believe, although I might be wrong. Older models such as the Ansco and B&J have plenty of movements but they're getting quite old and well-used; there might be some restoration involved. Ditto for the lighter but somewhat less functional (fewer movements) contemporaries and predecessors such as Kodak 2D, Seneca, etc. Pretty cameras and well matched for some people, but I don't think they match what you said are your needs and preferences.

More functional but not wood include the Wehman 8x10 and the Kodak Master View it is an improved successor of, the previously mentioned 8x10 camera from Richard Ritter, and various other new and expensive choices from Ebony, Lotus, etc. Really, you're going to have to do more research to narrow things down.

My own preference: Wehman, hands down. Not for everyone, though: he can't make nearly that many cameras. :)

Mike

Vaughn
24-Aug-2010, 07:18
I have a Zone VI 8x10 -- pretty close to the movements, size and weight of a Deardorf. With a Ries tripod and a selection of glass and 5 to 7 holders, I am hiking with around 60 pounds of equipment. Keeps me in shape, to say the least I can still get to where I want to go, but at 56, I don't know how much longer -- another 5 to 8 years perhaps. Then I will have to leave a lens or two at home and cut down to 4 holders if I want to make any distance. Or buy a Ritter and a f9 300mm lens instead of the FujiW 300/5.6 that is my main lens.

Lens choice depends on how you see and the limitations of the camera. A 120mm would not work with my Zone Vi -- too much bellows in the way to use much movements...nor do I like that wide of a lens Even my 159mm is tough to use the way I want to use it. My 210 (Wollie Graphic Raptar) sees more use -- and would see even more if it was in a shutter.

I prefer my 300mm/5.6. I photograph in low light most of the time (in the redwoods) and having a lens that is over twice as bright for viewing as a lighter f9 lens is worth the extra weight. If one does not have that restriction, then the Nikon 300/9 is a nice lens.

If I spent more time in Yosemite and such places, my 19" and 26" lenses would see more use (RD Artars barrel lenses), but even then, when I do go into the mountains, not having a shutter is a hassle. I need to use slower film and perhaps start using a ND filter to get the exposure times over a second...which in turn is a hassle if there is any wind. The Zone VI can handle the 26" with no problem, but was at its limit when I tried a 28" lens at infinity.

Good luck in your search!

Vaughn

Brian Ellis
24-Aug-2010, 13:05
You might want to rethink your desire for all possible movements. In general the more movements you have the more complex the camera, the heavier the camera, the more things there are to zero out when you take it down, and more "fussy" to set up. Do you really need back fall? Back shift? Or any shift for that matter (you can almost always just move the tripod a little). For most purposes if you have front tilt, swing, rise, maybe fall but not necessarily since you can always just point the camera down, and back tilt and swing, you have all the movements you need.

I've owned two Deardorffs and two Kodak 2Ds. All were nice cameras. If I were buying another 8x10 it would be a Deardorff - well made, solid, sturdy, simple to set up and take down, easy to operate, good bellows extension (28 inches or something in that range, you can look it up), and good resale value if you decide you don't like 8x10.

I'm not a fan of monorails for field work though some people are. I don't offhand ever remember seeing anyone here say they started out with a field camera for field work and want to switch to a monorail, I've seen literally a hundred or more people who say they started out with a monorail for field work and want to switch to a field camera.

Fragomeni
24-Aug-2010, 14:46
Thanks for all of the input everyone. It is all very useful and I'm using it all to consider what I'll go for.


You might want to rethink your desire for all possible movements. In general the more movements you have the more complex the camera, the heavier the camera, the more things there are to zero out when you take it down, and more "fussy" to set up. Do you really need back fall? Back shift? Or any shift for that matter (you can almost always just move the tripod a little). For most purposes if you have front tilt, swing, rise, maybe fall but not necessarily since you can always just point the camera down, and back tilt and swing, you have all the movements you need.

If I were buying another 8x10 it would be a Deardorff - well made, solid, sturdy, simple to set up and take down, easy to operate, good bellows extension (28 inches or something in that range, you can look it up), and good resale value if you decide you don't like 8x10.

Asking because Im currently leaning toward Deardorff, is there a particular model that you would recommend? I suppose you are right about not needing excessive movements in the field. Also, I've seen modifications for Deardorffs on ebay that allow you to modify the front standard to do different things. Is this necessary on all models or are there specific models that have most of what I'm looking for? I guess the question becomes which Deardorff would be best for my purposes and has the most movements that can be of benefit in the field? Which modifications would be best to expand the functionality of this particular camera? Thanks for your input.

climbabout
25-Aug-2010, 05:11
Francesco - I have been using Deardorffs for 25+ years, so I am very familiar with them. I currently shoot 8x10 and mainly contact print. Most of my work is outdoor landscape. The 8x10 model is called a V8. Older units do not have front swings - newer models from I believe the 1950's and newer have front swings. The camera itself weighs about 12.5-13lbs. Not lightweight, but not overly heavy for a wooden field camera. Check out this website for everything you ever wanted to know about Deardorffs:

http://deardorffcameras.0catch.com/

Just a side note - I travel quite a bit with mine and it's possible to put together an 8x10 kit that is quite manageable weight wise. I carry my 8x10 in an Osprey Porter 46liter pack with 4 holders, 4 lenses(159mm wollensak, 240mm fujinonA, 360mm artar in acme 4 shutter, 450mm fujinon, pentax spotmeter, 4 filters, 6x6 to 4x4 lensboard adapter, homemade lightweight darkcloth, loupe, pen, pad, and Gitzo CF tripod and the whole kit weighs in at 38.5lbs - quite manageable.

Tim

Brian Ellis
25-Aug-2010, 08:04
Thanks for all of the input everyone. It is all very useful and I'm using it all to consider what I'll go for.




Asking because Im currently leaning toward Deardorff, is there a particular model that you would recommend? I suppose you are right about not needing excessive movements in the field. Also, I've seen modifications for Deardorffs on ebay that allow you to modify the front standard to do different things. Is this necessary on all models or are there specific models that have most of what I'm looking for? I guess the question becomes which Deardorff would be best for my purposes and has the most movements that can be of benefit in the field? Which modifications would be best to expand the functionality of this particular camera? Thanks for your input.

I don't think Deardorff made a lot of different models of their 8x10 field camera.The ones I had and the ones you normally see for sale are known as the V8. The only significant difference I know of among Deardorff 8x10 field cameras is that some of the older ones didn't have front swing. However, you see very few of these today, almost all of the ones I've seen for sale in the last 10 or so years have had front swing. Nevertheless, if a seller doesn't mention its presence or absence you should ask because even if you don't use front swing very much its absence will affect resale value.

There were some minor cosmetic differences that show up from time to time. For example, IIRC one of the Deardorff brothers or sons didn't believe in putting a name plate on the cameras he assembled. And I've seen different looking tripod plates on the camera base. There's a also a "military" model, made by Deardorff for the Air Force in WWII. The only difference between it and other versions is that the military model requires lens boards with square rather than rounded corners. But in general if you get a Deardorff V8 you have the Deardorff 8x10 field camera.

I'm not sure what modifications to the Deardorff front standard you've seen. There's no front shift and a single knob controls both front tilt and rise. I suppose someone might modify the standard to provide independent controls for tilt and rise or conceivably to add shift. There's a little gizmo on the front of the camera that actually does allow a limited amount of rise without touching the knob that controls tilt. But if you need more rise than that gizmo allows then you have to use the knob that also controls tilt. Not a big deal to me but it bothers some people.

Good luck with your search, 8x10 is a great format and Deardorffs are excellent cameras.

Jim Galli
25-Aug-2010, 08:34
I think the best 8X10 for your purposes is a Kodak Improved #2 7X11 (with optional 8X10 back when needed). Antique, beautiful to behold, capable.

Frank Petronio
25-Aug-2010, 09:01
And for sale?

Jim Galli
25-Aug-2010, 09:16
And for sale?

Shocking intimation Frank, just shocking. ;)

Frank Petronio
25-Aug-2010, 10:22
FWIW, buying a camera from Jim comes with a lot of good karma and he is a very respectable gentleman to deal with.

Just watch out on his exotic lenses, now those can get expensive!

Fragomeni
25-Aug-2010, 10:33
I'm not sure what modifications to the Deardorff front standard you've seen. There's no front shift and a single knob controls both front tilt and rise. I suppose someone might modify the standard to provide independent controls for tilt and rise or conceivably to add shift.

This (http://cgi.ebay.com/8x10-Deardorff-Front-Swing-Assembly-Conversion-Kit-NEW-/330440039239?pt=Film_Cameras#ht_1206wt_1162) is the mod I've seen. Turns out its to add swing.


I think the best 8X10 for your purposes is a Kodak Improved #2 7X11 (with optional 8X10 back when needed). Antique, beautiful to behold, capable.

Haha, thanks for the heads up Jim!


FWIW, buying a camera from Jim comes with a lot of good karma and he is a very respectable gentleman to deal with.

Just watch out on his exotic lenses, now those can get expensive!

Haha, I'll keep that in mind :)

Ernest Purdum
25-Aug-2010, 10:34
The Century Universal might be an alternative to the Deardorff.

With cameras of this age, condition is everything. Especially bellows condition. Expensive.

Andrew Plume
25-Aug-2010, 13:58
Francesco

You've probably realised that your very interesting thread is 'a pretty big ask' but good luck, nevertheless

I've, fwiw, two 10x8's and I'm not entirely content with either of them. I've a beautiful restored Kodak 2D, absolutely lovely - you will not find a better restoration, i'm not really a limited movements man which is what's on offer here. Second up a is a Tachihara - another beauty but a fairly soft front standard, which is restrictive and I've never been entirely happy with anything longer than a 300mm when the extension is 'racked out'

My two favourites are a Wisner Traditional for 4x5 and a Canham Woodie for 5x7 - why? because apart from rear rise which I can do without, both have swing on the front and back + generous shift and for what I want to do, these are the creative 'assistants' that I need

if it helps, I suggest (and assuming that you've used the smaller formats) that you take/extract from what you were really fond of in a smaller LF camera and attempt to see if a 10x8 can fulfill that - of course there's an increasing cost here as you start to look for further movements and 10x8's usually tend to have less movements per se

I'm sure that Deardorff's are terrific and one day I'd love to own one but if the only option was one without swings, then I'd be less interested

I guess it also comes down to what sort of photographic style you're after - after all George Tice to name one, always seems to have been more than happy with his Deardorff

good luck again


andrew

Armin Seeholzer
25-Aug-2010, 14:23
I wote for an Burke & James in good working order!
Mine handels lenses from 120 SW Nikkor up to the 610 mm Nikkor with ease and the camera has almost all movements like a monorail! The only limitation is the bellows!

Cheers Armin

Peter De Smidt
25-Aug-2010, 20:26
If I were in the market for a wood field 8x10, I'd check out:
https://www.badgergraphic.com/store/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=925

in addition to a Wehman, a Kodak Masterview, a Zone VI, a Wisner. If possible, see if someone fairly local has any of those cameras so that you could get a look at one.

John Kasaian
25-Aug-2010, 20:39
Deardorff.
If not Deardorff then a Century Universal.
If you'll be working out of a car, then an Agfa/Ansco Universal model(make sure it is a Universal!) Should work nicely for you, especially if it is varnished and has the brass furniture.
I've been using a "beater" dorff for the last 12 years and couldn't be happier!:D

Cor
26-Aug-2010, 02:38
My 0.05 cents..since I only own one 8*10 and it is still my first one..

I am quite happy with my metal Toyo Field 810M. It is very sturdy, excelent build quality. Has all the movements I need, but this sturdiness comes with a price; weight. Folds quite compact

My model as a double extension and a moderate bellow draw (around 650mm), the 810MII has triple extension and longer bellows.

Best,

Cor

Fragomeni
26-Aug-2010, 14:21
Ok, so for now I'm definitely leaning toward a Deardorff V8. Regarding another camera that I've seen, what are your opinions on Tachihara cameras (8x10 in this case)? Quality, bang for your buck, accessibility to parts and accessories? Give me the rundown please. Thanks!

Fragomeni
26-Aug-2010, 14:27
Deardorff.
If not Deardorff then a Century Universal.

Can you tell me more about the Century Universal? Why exactly do you recommend it and how does it compare to Deardorff? Thanks.

Jim Galli
26-Aug-2010, 14:44
Ok, so for now I'm definitely leaning toward a Deardorff V8. Regarding another camera that I've seen, what are your opinions on Tachihara cameras (8x10 in this case)? Quality, bang for your buck, accessibility to parts and accessories? Give me the rundown please. Thanks!


Like a '55 Chevy Bel-Air parked next to a Toyota Tercel. They'll both get you to town.

shadow images
26-Aug-2010, 14:57
Like a '55 Chevy Bel-Air parked next to a Toyota Tercel. They'll both get you to town.

That's a good one. I have a beater Dorff for know but at some point want a Ritter for the weight savings. Cameras are like cars everyone thinks theirs is the best.

Ernest Purdum
26-Aug-2010, 15:02
The Century Universal opens up like a Graphic. It has full movements, although the range of some is rather limited. If I remember correctly, the bellows draw is about
30". Deardorffs are more fashionable, so the Century Universaql price may be much better. Again, though, condition is most important.

John NYC
26-Aug-2010, 16:37
If I were in the market for a wood field 8x10, I'd check out:
https://www.badgergraphic.com/store/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=925

in addition to a Wehman, a Kodak Masterview, a Zone VI, a Wisner. If possible, see if someone fairly local has any of those cameras so that you could get a look at one.

+1 for the Wehman lightweight!

Maris Rusis
26-Aug-2010, 18:32
Ok, so for now I'm definitely leaning toward a Deardorff V8. Regarding another camera that I've seen, what are your opinions on Tachihara cameras (8x10 in this case)? Quality, bang for your buck, accessibility to parts and accessories? Give me the rundown please. Thanks!

I purchased my triple extension Tachihara 810HD in 1992 and have tried working it to death ever since. In that time it has accumulated a few honourable scars but it still looks beautiful enough to attract comment including a genuine ITAH.

The Tachihara has never failed technically and I have never run out camera movements in field, landscape or portrait work. If I was doing still life/close-up/table top work maybe a monorail would be better. If I was an architecture specialist I'd want a bag bellows that the Tachi' does not have.

I've used a Deardorff but the Tachihara is lighter, cheaper, just as capable, and more beautiful. The Deardorff is more robust, heavier, and is a more prestigious article.

Fragomeni
26-Aug-2010, 19:58
The Century Universal opens up like a Graphic. It has full movements, although the range of some is rather limited. If I remember correctly, the bellows draw is about 30". Deardorffs are more fashionable, so the Century Universaql price may be much better. Again, though, condition is most important.

How do the movements compare to Deardorff? You mention the Century Universal can be limited, how so exactly?

Fragomeni
26-Aug-2010, 19:59
I purchased my triple extension Tachihara 810HD in 1992 and have tried working it to death ever since. In that time it has accumulated a few honourable scars but it still looks beautiful enough to attract comment including a genuine ITAH.

The Tachihara has never failed technically and I have never run out camera movements in field, landscape or portrait work. If I was doing still life/close-up/table top work maybe a monorail would be better. If I was an architecture specialist I'd want a bag bellows that the Tachi' does not have.

I've used a Deardorff but the Tachihara is lighter, cheaper, just as capable, and more beautiful. The Deardorff is more robust, heavier, and is a more prestigious article.

What is a good price for a used Tachihara? And what is the bellows extension? Thanks.

Bruce Barlow
27-Aug-2010, 03:11
Feeling unusually mortal these days, I declare that life's too short, and I'm the only one taking care of me. Therefore, I deserve my Ritter, and my Norma 8x10/5x7/4x5. I had to save for a while to afford my Ritter, but I'm worth it.

The pinnacle in self-indulgence.

Now I need you all to buy my book so I can afford film...

Bob McCarthy
27-Aug-2010, 08:29
I've not seem much mention of the Chamonix in this thread. Is the product loosing favor with the 8x10 crowd??

bob

Maris Rusis
27-Aug-2010, 19:48
What is a good price for a used Tachihara? And what is the bellows extension? Thanks.

I don't see a lot of used triple extension Tachihara 8x10 cameras on the market. I guess they are tightly held by their owners because they are gratifying to use and there is no rational prospect of trading up. I paid about US$1500 back in '92 for mine and I guess it would go for the same number of (inflation shrunk) dollars now. The latest Japanese price I have seen for a new one is 276150 YEN and Badger Graphic Sales current list price is US$2295. Bellows extension is 840mm and the camera is surprisingly sag free full out.
The double extension Tachihara 8x10 (550mm max extension) is cheaper and lighter but it is strictly a front focusser which can drive you nuts when you are doing big face portraits or close-up work.

aluncrockford
28-Aug-2010, 04:39
I have both the Tacihara triple extension and a Deardorff V8 and a Sinar P2. The P2 works on a studio stand ,on location it is not a joy unless your assistant is carrying it so I would avoid it . The Tachihara has a plastic screen which is brighter but difficult to fine focus ,the Deardorrf has a ground glass screen
The Deardorff is the easier camera to use ,it is more intuitive and has a range of reducing backs which as far as I am aware the Tachihara does not. Also if you buy anything but a Deardorff you will spend your entire time wishing you had bought a one.

Maris Rusis
28-Aug-2010, 18:24
[QUOTE]The Deardorff is the easier camera to use ,it is more intuitive and has a range of reducing backs which as far as I am aware the Tachihara does not.

Both the Deardorff and the Tachihara become intuitive with practice and it is important that they do. Remember, the photographer is at the back under the focussing cloth and looking at the ground glass so the camera controls have to fall to hand without looking. This takes practice.

For completeness the Tachihara reducing backs 8x10/5x7 and 8x10/4x5 are both listed at 52 500 yen each.

Frank Petronio
28-Aug-2010, 22:28
Just to counter, I used to use Deardorffs in studios when I assisted in the 80s. I never was impressed, their knurled knobs ripped my flesh because you could never get the camera to lock down tight enough, you'd run out of movements for studio work, I never thought they were all that stable or nice or anything. If I didn't know all you old guys would pee yourselves over them I would have thrown them out with all the rest of that old junk.

But I see Paulo Roversi uses one and the original poster is Italian, so perhaps it is his influence or peer pressure?

Richard Rau
29-Aug-2010, 10:26
When I started out in 8x10, I bought a Folmer Graflex Century Universal, often called a poor man's Deardorff. I used it quite a bit, both out of the back of my car and backpacking. It's a bit lighter than a Deardorff. When I could finally afford one, I bought a Deardorff, and have never regretted it. I've used a Canham 5x7 field, and although it's a solid well built camera, I find that over time the locking cams become loose. The front rail locking cams are located on the inside of the rails, and underneath the rear standard, difficult for my fingers to reach, and not intuitive in practical use. The Canham is somewhat complicated to stow away after you loosen every knob in order to fold it up. On the other hand, the Deardorff V8 for me at least, is totally intuitive to use. The controls are all where they need to be, and the thumb openings designed into the rear standard supports, so you can loosen the rear swing knobs, is pure genius in my opinion. (I'm usually all thumbs anyway.) The knurled knobs on a Deardorff are a bit rough, but for me the camera locks down just fine. The Deardorff is also a breeze to open up and close. I can do that in half the time it takes me to close or open a Canham. There's a lot of choices out there and ergonomics is really an important consideration when choosing a view camera. Good luck with your search.

Peter York
29-Aug-2010, 13:59
Read this for info on the Century Universal:
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/century/century_universal_8x10.html

Don Dudenbostel
30-Aug-2010, 19:40
I've used my V8 since the early 70's. No complaints at all other than its quite old now and shows its age. I'm the 3rd owner and it was made in the 30's. I updatedcthe camera to the current front standard in the mid 70's and replaced the bellows. Just this year I purchased a new Canham traditional and plan to retire my V8. Its currently on display in a museum exhibition of my work but will keep it and let my friends use it.

The V8 is superb, very portable, stable, plenty of movements even for studio product work and a true joy to use. The Canham is everything tv V8 is plus lighter and takes a wide angle bellows allowing better movements with wide lenses.

Fragomeni
30-Aug-2010, 21:27
Read this for info on the Century Universal:
http://www.largeformatphotography.in...rsal_8x10.html
__________________
Peter Y.

Thanks for this Peter! Very interesting! I kind of want one more now just because of the Weston usage. I absolutely idolize Weston.


I've used my V8 since the early 70's. No complaints at all other than its quite old now and shows its age. I'm the 3rd owner and it was made in the 30's. I updatedcthe camera to the current front standard in the mid 70's and replaced the bellows. Just this year I purchased a new Canham traditional and plan to retire my V8. Its currently on display in a museum exhibition of my work but will keep it and let my friends use it.

The V8 is superb, very portable, stable, plenty of movements even for studio product work and a true joy to use. The Canham is everything tv V8 is plus lighter and takes a wide angle bellows allowing better movements with wide lenses.

Don, you should sell her to me at the discounted starving artist price! I promise I'll keep her well and in use as she should be! She's not ready to stop yet and I'll make sure she gets another lifetime of use and exceptional care and maintenance. Let me know if you think we can maybe make that happen! :)

Fragomeni
31-Aug-2010, 11:31
Hi can anyone talk to me about the Tachihara double extension vs. the triple extension? My main question is whether or not I really need the triple and if I get a double, can you easily purchase the parts to turn it into a triple? Thanks!

Maris Rusis
31-Aug-2010, 17:33
I use both the double extension and triple extension 8x10 Tachiharas.

The double extension camera is a better field camera because it is lighter, marginally more compact, and has a shorter minimum bellows extension for very wide lenses.

The triple extension Tachihara can be made to do everything the double extension does at the price of initial expense, minor weight increase, and slightly more bulk.

The triple extension camera kills the double version in the studio, for portraits, and for table top work. Why? The reason is the the triple extension Tachihara can focus with the back and that is utterly essential for any kind of close-up work. A front focussing camera like the double extension Tachi changes the lens to subject distance while focussing. This changes the repro ratio (magnification) while you chase focus. At worst the image on the ground glass changes size as you rack back and forth but never comes into focus at all. Most frustrating!

If I had but one 8x10 camera it would be the triple extension Tachi. That's the one I bought first.

eddie
1-Sep-2010, 01:49
If I didn't know all you old guys would pee yourselves over them I would have thrown them out with all the rest of that old junk.



har har har! be nice to the old dorff users frank....now they will not be able to sleep. :cool: