PDA

View Full Version : Caltar II-N



David Woods
12-Apr-2010, 21:53
Hi

I am new to LF can anybody give me some info on the attached picture, it's a caltar 11-n 360mm whats the largest format it will cover is it a descent lens or where I can get the technical information sheet for it?

Regards
David

BradS
12-Apr-2010, 22:01
nominal coverage is probably around 70 degrees. that would make an image circle of about 490 mm. It might be adequate for 11x14 but is probably best suited to 8x10.

ps: I'm watching it too. good luck.

Oren Grad
12-Apr-2010, 22:11
It's the Rodenstock (Apo-)Sironar-N under the private label of Calumet Photographic, a large dealer in the US and now Europe as well.

The 360 will cover 11x14, though without a lot of room for movement. It offers ample movement for 8x10 or smaller formats. It's a large, heavy lens which goes fine on most 8x10 cameras but can be a burden to carry in the field. Most users would find it excessive for a 4x5 field camera, and some of the lighter ones would have trouble tolerating that much weight on the front standard.

Optically it's a very competent lens, but whether it would be a good choice for you depends on how much you are willing to carry and what uses you have in mind. Can you tell us more?

Oren Grad
12-Apr-2010, 22:12
nominal coverage is probably around 70 degrees. that would make an image circle of about 490 mm.

64 and 435, actually.

David Woods
12-Apr-2010, 22:43
nominal coverage is probably around 70 degrees. that would make an image circle of about 490 mm. It might be adequate for 11x14 but is probably best suited to 8x10.

ps: I'm watching it too. good luck.

Hi
Don't waste your bidding on early bids, I will assume it must be an alright lens.

Regards
David

David Woods
12-Apr-2010, 22:52
It's the Rodenstock (Apo-)Sironar-N under the private label of Calumet Photographic, a large dealer in the US and now Europe as well.

The 360 will cover 11x14, though without a lot of room for movement. It offers ample movement for 8x10 or smaller formats. It's a large, heavy lens which goes fine on most 8x10 cameras but can be a burden to carry in the field. Most users would find it excessive for a 4x5 field camera, and some of the lighter ones would have trouble tolerating that much weight on the front standard.

Optically it's a very competent lens, but whether it would be a good choice for you depends on how much you are willing to carry and what uses you have in mind. Can you tell us more?

I have a toyo view deluxe, which I cannot tell you much about except it is a heavy unit, at the moment I have a semmar lens (Congo) but it has a lot of scratches on it, and it is on a graflex board, I bought the lot on ebay about 5 years ago for $100 and it's been sitting in the corner ever since, I was hoping to do some landscape or architecture photography with it.

David

rdenney
13-Apr-2010, 07:40
I have a toyo view deluxe, which I cannot tell you much about except it is a heavy unit, at the moment I have a semmar lens (Congo) but it has a lot of scratches on it, and it is on a graflex board, I bought the lot on ebay about 5 years ago for $100 and it's been sitting in the corner ever since, I was hoping to do some landscape or architecture photography with it.

I think you'll find this lens rather long for landscapes and architecture, except for doing details from a distance. The "normal" lens for 4x5 is 150mm, so this lens is about 2-1/2 times that--pretty long. Most would want one of these as a fourth or fifth lens for 4x5 in that application, and even then they might prefer a slower, lighter lens at that focal length.

Were I you, I'd start with something shorter than normal, in the 120-135mm range.

Have you made images with the Semmar yet? The scratches might not have as negative an effect you think, especially if you are careful about shading the lens. Moving it to a Toyo board will not be difficult. Learn what you can with what you have.

Rick "thinking something like a used 120mm Super Angulon will be cheaper and more useful" Denney

Dominique Cesari
13-Apr-2010, 12:57
Some literature about Rodenstock (http://web.archive.org/web/20031204085635/www.butzi.net/rodenstock/rodenstock.htm) that Paul Butzi hosted are on the Wayback machine, of which the Apo-Sironar N 360 mm MTF charts (http://web.archive.org/web/20031205134854/www.butzi.net/rodenstock/apo-sironar-n/360mm.htm) and the overall specs of Apo-Sironar N (http://web.archive.org/web/20030811154246/www.butzi.net/rodenstock/apo-sironar-n/page2.htm). But they may appear or not from time to other time.
Specs of the 360 N : filter thread M105x1, push on mount diameter 110 mm, rear lens barrel diameter 80 mm, flange focal distance 333 mm, overall length 116,5 mm, (angle of view and image circle 64 and 435 mm @f 22 as Oren said).

David Woods
13-Apr-2010, 14:56
I think you'll find this lens rather long for landscapes and architecture, except for doing details from a distance. The "normal" lens for 4x5 is 150mm, so this lens is about 2-1/2 times that--pretty long. Most would want one of these as a fourth or fifth lens for 4x5 in that application, and even then they might prefer a slower, lighter lens at that focal length.

Were I you, I'd start with something shorter than normal, in the 120-135mm range.

Have you made images with the Semmar yet? The scratches might not have as negative an effect you think, especially if you are careful about shading the lens. Moving it to a Toyo board will not be difficult. Learn what you can with what you have.

Rick "thinking something like a used 120mm Super Angulon will be cheaper and more useful" Denney

I have made images pretty poor ones, I need to practice on the large format, the scratchs show on the negs, I will try to shade it.
thanks for the advise.

David

rdenney
14-Apr-2010, 04:41
I have made images pretty poor ones, I need to practice on the large format, the scratchs show on the negs, I will try to shade it.
thanks for the advise.

David

Another trick on scratches is to fill them with black paint, though the exact procedure for this is not something I can outline. It eliminates internal reflections in the glass caused by the scratches. I have seen lenses with severe chips in the glass produce good results using this trick.

But the main point is: Your current lens will give you an idea of where you want and need to go with your next lens, if you give yourself an opportunity to gain some experience with it.

Rick "good luck" Denney