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View Full Version : Wollensak Verito f/6 used with 6x9



renes
12-Feb-2010, 14:31
I consider to buy Verito 6 inch f/6 lens for my 6x9 camera but I have two doubts which prevent me from buying it, maybe someone can resolve them:

1. will it be much harder to focus with this Verito soft lens on 6x9 screen (it's rather small)?
2. will it give similar halo effect when wide open (f/6) to Veritos f/4 used on 4x5 or 5x7?

thanks in advance.

CCHarrison
12-Feb-2010, 16:00
f/6 can be hard to focus on any screen, but perhaps with a magnifyer and darkcloth, it wont be an issue...

It will give simliar softness, but not quite the same amount given the 1/2 or so, stop difference. It shouldnt be too noticeable...As far as bokeh (out of focus areas) & dof - bokeh/oof/dof will be more noticeable at f/4 on larger format than f/6 on smaller format..

The 6.5 inch was model B and that did come in f/6

See my Verito section in my article here http://antiquecameras.net/softfocuslenses2.html

Thanks
Dan

lenser
12-Feb-2010, 16:35
You may be able to gain an advantage, depending on your camera type, by using one of the brightened screens. like the Intenscreen. They definitely make these for the RB's and RZ's if that's what you use. They will add about 2 stops of viewing brightness.

I have done something similar using a bellows with a specially machined mount for my 10 inch Veritar to work on my Hasselblad 2000FCM (so I can use the built in focal plain shutter and operate quickly without having to open for focus, doing the focusing, then closing again and setting the lens shutter before making the exposure. This has made a big, big improvement in working with portraits. Doesn't matter with landscape or still life.

The brighter screen makes a big advantage in focusing.

Robert Hughes
12-Feb-2010, 16:43
I've got an f/10 lens on my 8x10 camera - it can be a challenge to see the image, but I'm finding a way to do it.

dsphotog
12-Feb-2010, 17:55
You may be able to gain an advantage, depending on your camera type, by using one of the brightened screens. like the Intenscreen. They definitely make these for the RB's and RZ's if that's what you use. They will add about 2 stops of viewing brightness.

I have done something similar using a bellows with a specially machined mount for my 10 inch Veritar to work on my Hasselblad 2000FCM (so I can use the built in focal plain shutter and operate quickly without having to open for focus, doing the focusing, then closing again and setting the lens shutter before making the exposure. This has made a big, big improvement in working with portraits. Doesn't matter with landscape or still life.

The brighter screen makes a big advantage in focusing.

I did a similar adaptation with a Verito on a Pentax67, I thought I was the only one!

renes
13-Feb-2010, 09:42
Thanks.

I do not worry about focusing with f/6 apreture, I own a few f/6.8 lenses and found focusing on Bergheil' 6x9 groundglass quite easy. I rather worry about setting proper focusing plane/point (want to use it wide open all the time) on such small ground glass. Do you think it can cause a difficulty? I have read a few complaings about focusing dificulty with sotf-focus lenses (finding the right focusing plane/point), and that's why I suppose it should be even harder to do it on small ground glass like 6x9... Is there any explanation how to focus with soft lenses or with Veritos?

wfwhitaker
13-Feb-2010, 10:08
What's "focus"? But seriously...

Soft-focus lenses are difficult to focus. I think rather than trying to achieve critical focus, it's perhaps better simply to find the most pleasing presentation on the ground glass. Sometimes, in addition to front and rear shift, cameras should have paradigm shift.

A larger ground glass does have the advantage of being easier to see. For 6x9, consider a good pair of reading glasses instead of a focusing magnifier. Using both eyes will help you to see the small image as a whole.

lenser
13-Feb-2010, 10:40
It also helps if you are able to choose the focus point as being a part of the image that has a very high contrast range and a clearly defined edge such as the specular highlight in the eye that usually partly overlays the darker iris. Lacking that, opt for sharp edges in a landscape or still life. Seth has some great info on the Wollensak soft focus lenses at www.cameraeccentric.com.

cowanw
13-Feb-2010, 14:21
I have found that a silver or gold chain in a small link or woven pattern or a black nylon woven cord held in the plane of Focus is most useful to provide the sharp Light dark edges needed
Regards
Bill