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Toyon
23-Aug-2009, 08:19
Freestyle is now selling Acros in 10 sheet boxes (non-quickload). At $16.99 is it worth the premium over other films?

Jim Noel
23-Aug-2009, 09:29
For low light situations it can not be beaten.

Toyon
23-Aug-2009, 09:49
For low light situations it can not be beaten.

Because of its reciprocity characteristics? or something else?

Joanna Carter
23-Aug-2009, 10:24
Because of its reciprocity characteristics? or something else?
Mainly, because of the reciprocity (or lack of ;) ). With nothing up to 2 minutes and only 1/2 stop for up to 1000secs, I don't know of anything that can touch it.

Added to which, the tonality and range are just what I like.

Greg Blank
25-Aug-2009, 20:08
A few years back I tested Acros for View Camera, the characterisc curve for Acros was one the best films for exposure with multiple types of developer.

With good grain structure it is a very usable and should supported if it offered a standard sheet film . I will be investigating getting a box or two.
I have lots of unused film :)


Freestyle is now selling Acros in 10 sheet boxes (non-quickload). At $16.99 is it worth the premium over other films?

Drew Wiley
25-Aug-2009, 20:28
There are quite a few previous threads on this film. Just be aware that it is orthopan
and not panchromatic. Greens will be a little more buoyant, reds not as washed out
as with many films. Love this stuff in the mountains; seems to render the light and
foliage more realistically. Good acutance, and as already mentioned, excellent recip
characteristics.

Athiril
26-Aug-2009, 06:49
SHIIIBBYYYY

Acros in my top 3 :)

Along with Ilford FP4 and Shanghai :)

nelsonfotodotcom
1-Sep-2009, 04:48
I buy my 4x5 Acros loose stocks from Japan. Glad to see it being carried in the US, again.

For long-exposure work, it's incredible. Hell, it's pretty damned incredible in good light. My "slow" B&W film of choice.

Mark Booth
8-Sep-2009, 15:10
I just purchased a (minty 4x5 Wisner Expedition) so I'm chomping-at-the-bit to travel to the Washington State "Palouse" farmlands in the eastern Washington. This time of year one can encounter many weather extremes. I was just ready to restock my sheet film selection, so perhaps Acros 100 will fit-the-bill for my landscape shooting session :)

More specifically: Some time ago I purchased Acros 100 from a Japan source then from Badger Graphic, but now see that it is carried by Freestyle. I loved the tonal qualities when used in fine art fashion and outdoor portraiture, and found it worked well with my darkroom printing methods at that time. I stopped using it because it was so hard to get on a consistent basis, and began using Delta 100 or FP-4 or TXP films.

I now work mostly with PMK so I wonder about its response to tanning and staining development?

Any experience or suggestions?

óMark

Eric Brody
8-Sep-2009, 17:49
I just saw some 10 sheet Acros 4x5 boxes at my local store, Pro Photo Supply in Portland (OR), for $18.99/box, I believe. I'm so distraught over the loss of the Quickloads, I'm not sure I can bear to buy these.

Eric

Andrew O'Neill
8-Sep-2009, 18:03
What's with the 10 sheet boxes?? I think that's really bad marketing.

BarryS
8-Sep-2009, 18:37
What's with the 10 sheet boxes?? I think that's really bad marketing.

The Fujifilm rep on APUG mentioned that they they they had a ton of 10-sheet boxes lying around and something to the effect of it would reduce costs to use them. I agree it's a bad marketing decision, because 10 sheet 4x5 boxes are inconvenient *and* the price stinks compared to Ilford and Kodak B&W films.

Drew Wiley
8-Sep-2009, 19:21
Mark - ACROS gets along just fine with PMK. The amount of tanning is more than
you get with Delta or TMax100, but predictably less than thick-emulsion films like
HP5, and somewhat less than FP4. I haven't had it ever blow out the highlights like FP4 is sometimes capable of (if overdeveloped). But FP4 is the film ACROS most
resembles in printing characteristics, if both are done in PMK. They're about the
same effective speed too. Biggest difference is their spectral sensitivity and recip
characteristics.