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Jehu
31-Mar-2009, 08:24
I'm getting a little tired of mixing powders. I've been using ID-11 and D-76. What do you use and why?

I shoot 4X5:
Delta 100 & 400
HP5+ 400
Tmax 100 & 400

Thanks for any help on this.

Ron Marshall
31-Mar-2009, 08:56
Although a powder, XTOL mixes more easily than ID-11/D76.

Below is a link to a Kodak chart that lists developer charecteristics:

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/chemistry/bwFilmProcessing/selecting.jhtml?pq-path=14053

Gem Singer
31-Mar-2009, 09:03
Ilford DD-X is a liquid concentrate. No need to mix powders.

DD-X is a Phenidone-Hydroquinone formulation. A prosumer version of Ilford's DD developer that they sell to commercial labs.

FA-1027 is also a liquid concentrate available from The Photographer's Formulary. Similar formula to DD-X, but less expensive.

Both of these developers work great with Ilford HP-5+ and Delta films.

Of course, Pyrocat HD or MC are available in liquid concentrate form (be sure to get them in glycol).

Maretzo
31-Mar-2009, 09:25
Hi,

I tried rodinal for several 4x5 sheets (Delta 100) and 120 (FP4 and Delta 100) and I found the result too grainy for my taste. I switched to D76, as it was said very difficult to mix, once the D76 finished, I may try DD-X or Xtol.

J D Clark
31-Mar-2009, 09:26
The obvious choice if you don't want to mix powders for film development is HC110. It can be used in a variety of concentrations, the most common is dilution B (1 oz in a quart). I also use HC110 for compensating development, very dilute at 1 oz in a gallon.

There's been a lot written about HC110 here, and elsewhere that I won't repeat, but it is a wonderful all-around film developer.

John Clark
www.johndclark.com

Sal Santamaura
31-Mar-2009, 09:42
Ilford Perceptol 1:3. This permits processing in Jobo Expert drums, using continuous agitation, when the tap water and ambient air temperatures are very high here during July through September, for times long enough to ensure even development.

For example, to achieve a CI=0.56 ("N") Fuji Acros negative, my times are 9 min. 0 sec. at 75 degrees F or 7 min. 30 sec. at 81 degrees F. Rotation speed is approximately 46 rpm and EI (metered with a Zone VI-modified Pentax digital spot and measured using a calibrated densitometer for 0.1 above fb-f) is 125.

Jim Galli
31-Mar-2009, 11:58
I use mostly PyroCat HD. Mixing powders is necessary to get the stock solution, then you don't have to re-visit it for months. I use it because it's very CHEAP and it is also very forgiving of my type of photography with the antique lenses. I'll explain. I use antique portrait / soft focus lenses. I use them wide open and I use them outdoors in daylight. That means I can't get quick enough exposures very often. The PcatHD is a self leveling developer. That works very well if you've got 3X the exposure that would have been ideal. You can do a pull development and the catechol will get to a certain point in the highlights and level off.

With ordinary film and good exposure values sometimes I'll get lazy or won't be in the mood to mix up stock solution for a couple of weeks and then I use HC 110 dilution H. Very easy. I have one of those little cough syrup graduates. pour HC110 into between the 10 and the 15ml and drop the entire graduate into 800 ml tapwater.

I know it's not supposed to be that easy. Sorry. With the HC 110 I do pay a bit more attention to the H2O temp. I'm not one of the great technicians. Mostly I get away with it beautifully.

Ole Tjugen
31-Mar-2009, 12:06
I'm using Ilfotec-HC unless I have a very good reason to mix up something "esoteric".

I started using it because I got a LOT of it very cheap, and at the rate I'm using it I will be using it for the foreseeable future to. Of course it helps a lot that it not only lasts a very long time, but it is also a very good developer which gives me negatives that I like to print - every time.

Filmnut
31-Mar-2009, 12:14
I am usually shooting Delta 100 in 4X5, so I now use Rodinal at 1:50, for the increased sharpness it gives. I am not so fond of Rodinal in the smaller formats, as it gives me more grain than I prefer. At the print sizes I usually make from 4X5, (16X20-20X24) the increased grain isn't noticible, but the slight improvement in sharpness is.
Otherwise I use Xtol for most of my smaller format film.
Keith

W K Longcor
31-Mar-2009, 12:28
Hi,

I tried rodinal for several 4x5 sheets (Delta 100) and 120 (FP4 and Delta 100) and I found the result too grainy for my taste. I switched to D76, as it was said very difficult to mix, once the D76 finished, I may try DD-X or Xtol.

In defense of Rodinal -- it never was for fine grain. But what grain there is -- is sharp as a tack! It is a high acutance (I hope I spelled that correctly) developer. I have a print made from 35mm tri-x developed in Rodinal 1:100 -- I showed the spocket holes on the print -- they are larger than a 4x5 sheet of film. The image is SHARP! And from a proper viewing distance for a print of this size, the grain is not offensive.

If the subject has smooth gradation of lighting and tone, the grain "blends" nicely. It becomes very visable in contrasty subjects.

At the high dilutions ( which are very easy to mix), Rodnal is great in a rotary processor.

Mick Noordewier
31-Mar-2009, 14:12
HC-110, mostly with HP5+.

Like you, I wanted to avoid mixing powders. In addition, I wanted to avoid fussing with a lot of temperature control. I process in a Jobo drum w/o bath, and can't guarantee that the drum temperature stays the same as the water temperature. My "darkroom" temperatures range from 68F to 74F during the year. According to http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/ development time can be adjusted to temperature by the formula:

New time = Old time exp(-0.045 (New temp F - Old temp F))

Sooo...

- Water (bottled distilled) and Jobo drum at room temperature
- HC-110 dilution H
- Adjust time according to www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110
- Develop/fix/rinse on a unidirectional Beseler motor base

Dilution H gives me reasonable times in the drum (8-12 minutes, depending on temp) so I don't worry about the time spent filling or emptying. HC-110 is used dilution H as a one-shot developer.

Not quite as casual as Jim Galli, but no fuss, minimal equipment, reproducible.

-Mick

Peter De Smidt
31-Mar-2009, 14:26
I use Pyrocat HD because it is available in a two part liquid concentrate, the concentrates last for years, it's inexpensive, it works in a Jobo, Sandy King (the formulator) is a knowledgeable and helpful person, and the grain size/sharpness balance works well for my photography.

Mark Sawyer
31-Mar-2009, 15:10
HC-110, usually at b dilution. It's a lovely developer with any film I've tried it on, and the stock solution has a very, very long shelf life, (it's in a glycol base, so it doesn't oxydize or hydrolize).

richfrank
31-Mar-2009, 16:06
Xtol - straight - it will last along time ( a couple of months) undiluted and it will process alot of films before it wears out.

Rich

Andrew O'Neill
31-Mar-2009, 17:56
Pyrocat-HD because it's economical and I like what the stain can do for me on VC paper and Kallitypes. It gives really nice smooth high value tones, and sharp grain. It's also a great developer for stand and semi-stand development. I also mix up LC-1B when I work with APHS film when continuous tones are needed. Recently I've been playing around with an Amidol film developer.

Arne Croell
31-Mar-2009, 18:48
For TMX and TMY-2 sheet film, I use TMAX RS developer in the Jobo. Not according to instructions, but following what I learned from John Sexton years ago, I premix concentrate A and B, and then use that as one shot developer at 1+9 dilution (except for N+2 where I use 1+4).

tmastran
31-Mar-2009, 20:52
I've been using D76 1:1 in trays for over 30 years. I know how it works, and I guess I just like the smell. :)

Chris Strobel
31-Mar-2009, 20:55
PMK Pyro...........taste great............less filling :D

catshaver
2-Apr-2009, 13:00
Pyrocat HD for me. I started using it when I purchased a large quantity of Forte 400 film which is very grainy. The pyrocat helps eliminate or blend the very obvious graininess I would normally get in the highlights with any other developer. Also, it yields the best looking negatives (almost 3-d looking) I have ever seen. I use it with Forte, FP4, Tri-X but not Efke 25. For Efke, I use Rodinal to bring out the sparkle.

IanG
2-Apr-2009, 13:21
Now Pyrocat HD with everything :D

But for nearly 20 years Rodinal and also Xtol for commercial work, OK I mix Pyrocat approx once a year from raw chemicals and after that it's just quick & simple.

I use Pyrocat with Ilford FP4/HP4 Delta 100 & 400, Fomapan 100/200 as well as my last stock of Fortepan 200 but particularly EFKE PL25, it's a superb combination.

Ian

Michael_4514
2-Apr-2009, 13:28
DD-X for HP-5, T-Max developer for T-Max, and Rodinal for just about everything else.

Seeing so many good things about pyrocat-hd makes me think about trying it. Where do you guys get the chemicals to mix it?

John Bowen
2-Apr-2009, 14:28
Another Pyrocat HD. I use it with Tmax 400 (5x7, 8x10 and 7x17) and contact print on Azo/Amidol. A wonderful combination of materials!

For smaller formats (35mm & 4x5) I still use Tri-x/HC-110

Joanna Carter
2-Apr-2009, 14:55
Can I just ask about developing Fuji Acros?

I have always used Ilford DD-X 1+4 in a CombiPlan tank for 8mins30secs @ 20C. Absolutely beautiful results: tonality range, lack of visible grain, etc.

Now, I am about to start using a Jobo ATL-1500, which can only cope with 24C, thus shortening the dev time to as little as around 6mins. Now, that would be OK but, if I were to do N-2 or N-3 development, I would end up with times around 4mins.

1. Should this be enough to give thorough development?
2. Is there another developer that would give longer times without compromising the results I am getting at the moment?

Gene McCluney
2-Apr-2009, 17:24
I use HC-110 in dilutions "B" and "E". I do deep tank processing of sheet film, and I need convenience.

Ken Lee
2-Apr-2009, 17:25
Another vote for Pyrocat HD.

Here's a sample image (http://www.kenleegallery.com/html/tech/f54.html). Here's another (http://www.kenleegallery.com/html/tech/f18.html).

catshaver
2-Apr-2009, 17:55
DD-X for HP-5, T-Max developer for T-Max, and Rodinal for just about everything else.

Seeing so many good things about pyrocat-hd makes me think about trying it. Where do you guys get the chemicals to mix it?

I buy mine in a two part solution from Photographer's formulary in a glycol base. It is a little more expensive than mixing one's own ingredients, but still a fabulous value.

http://www.photoformulary.com/DesktopDefault.aspx?tabindex=2&tabid=9&CategoryID=31&langID=0

Henry Ambrose
2-Apr-2009, 18:01
Can I just ask about developing Fuji Acros?

I have always used Ilford DD-X 1+4 in a CombiPlan tank for 8mins30secs @ 20C. Absolutely beautiful results: tonality range, lack of visible grain, etc.

Now, I am about to start using a Jobo ATL-1500, which can only cope with 24C, thus shortening the dev time to as little as around 6mins. Now, that would be OK but, if I were to do N-2 or N-3 development, I would end up with times around 4mins.

1. Should this be enough to give thorough development?
2. Is there another developer that would give longer times without compromising the results I am getting at the moment?

If the ATL 1500 and the tank you use can handle a large enough quantity of developer - increase your dilution. Maybe 1:6? You'll have to test for your new time, maybe half again as long?

Henry Ambrose
2-Apr-2009, 18:14
I like these developers in the following order:

Xtol
Pyrocat HD
DDX
Divided D76H or D23
Rodinal

Xtol is hard to beat for all around goodness and its cheap and easy to use.

Pyrocat HD is great. Now that its available in liquid I might use it a bit more.

DDX is wonderful but doesn't keep that well and is expensive.

I also very much like Divided D76H or D23. Neither keep as well as Xtol but can give fabulous results. If mixing from raw chemicals was my choice I'd use one of these.

Rodinal has its own special look with Tri-X, but not good for everything, seems to keep forever.

I pared down to Xtol about 5 years ago to simplify my darkroom life. 5 liters is cheap, keeps very, very well and works great with every film I've ever put through it. Most of the time I use it at 1:3.

John Bowen
2-Apr-2009, 18:32
DD-X for HP-5, T-Max developer for T-Max, and Rodinal for just about everything else.

Seeing so many good things about pyrocat-hd makes me think about trying it. Where do you guys get the chemicals to mix it?

Raw Chemicals can be purchased from the Photographers Formulary or Artcraft Chemicals

Jim Fitzgerald
2-Apr-2009, 20:05
Pyrocat-HD is my standard developer. For my 8x10,11x14 and 8x20 it is a great developer. I have some of that 3-D looking Efke-25 in 11x14 that I can't wait to print in carbon transfer. Like Jim said once you mix it it lasts a long time is cheap and gives great results. You can pull or push most films with this developer and do minimal agitation which is how I develop the 8x10's and soon the 11x14's.


Jim

geoffrey billett
3-Apr-2009, 05:09
Good thread. Ive used ID11 with mostly HP5 and Efke 25 and been mostly pleased. I bought chemicals for Pyro HD late last year but have not got around to mixing yet as I read there may be problems dissolving some of the chemicals. Those who recommend Pyro HD can they quickly clarify how they mix the chemicals ( temperatures etc ). The Sandy King reference on Unblinking Eye does not specify temperatures ( if I recall correctly ).

Thanks
Geoff

neil poulsen
3-Apr-2009, 07:46
Maybe you need a laboratory quality electric stirrer. It's got an electromagnet that turns and by magnetic induction also turns a magnetized, plastic coated rod that you put into the mixing vessel. I paid about $150 for a used model that also has heat.

Great investment! I slowly mix in the powder, stir by hand so that the powder is suspended and moving in the water, and walk away. Takes about 5 minutes to get it started. When I return 40 or 50 minutes later, the developer is thoroughly mixed.

geoffrey billett
3-Apr-2009, 08:43
Neat answer though one which I learnt nothing from. A simple question; are there any water temperature requirements I need to be aware of when I mix raw chemicals to make sols A and B for Pyro HD. I am a simple soul :-).

Perhaps tonight may be the night I move from proprietary branded materials to solutions more esoteric and alchemic. A bit like losing ones viginity. Electronic stirring paddles conjures all kinds of bizarre images. I would imagine good value tho for $150

Richard Wasserman
3-Apr-2009, 09:21
Geoffrey,

I mix Pyrocat HD in tap water at 115 degrees. I mix it in a beaker and stir by hand, no fancy mixers for me. I find all the ingredients go into solution easily. Pyrocat is my most used developer.

Richard Wasserman
3-Apr-2009, 09:23
I just want to add that I wear gloves, work in a well ventilated area, and wear a high efficiency dust mask when mixing Pyrocat. You really don't want to be breathing Catechol fumes or particles.

Drew Wiley
3-Apr-2009, 09:55
I use PMK pyro or certain tweaks of it for virtually all my conventional (non-lab) b&w
films, every format from 35mm to 8x10. Stores extremely well once mixed into the
A&B liquid components. The advantages of it are well published. For my "look" I prefer it to Pyrocat (I enlarge rather than contact print). I am currently experimenting with the Max Pyro tweak. For lab use like color masking, color separation negatives, etc I have all sorts of developers on hand, since these applications are far more fussy than general shooting and the intended parameters are entirely different.

geoffrey billett
3-Apr-2009, 11:43
Thanks Richard. Just the information I was looking for. I'll mix over the weekend. Any particular storage requirements ie glass, plastic etc.?

Ive just received 4 boxes of 5x7 HP5+ from Robert Whites which was sufficient motivation to make the jump.

Thanks again
Geoff

gevalia
3-Apr-2009, 12:20
I'm almost at the point where I have standardized on using Prescysol EF for both 4x5 and 120. It's a 2-part liquid, Pyro, very much like Pyrocat HD, and I can mix different films together and develope them all for 10.5 minutes (together) semi-stand in my Combi Plan tank. 120 in SS of course. Some have had issues with Acros but I have not. But it does seem to not like TMAX100 for me. Efke is gorgeous.

My pennies worth.

aduncanson
3-Apr-2009, 14:11
Some folks who brew their own beer build a magnetic stirrer from a computer's muffin fan with a simple circuit to control the speed. Instructions can probably be found on line and the stirrers themselves are sold on ebay for much less than $150.

Being lazy and short on time, I bought one assembled. It is certainly a kludge and pouring the dry powders in slowly is a must, but it is a pleasure to have your developers mixed for you while you do something else.

Ole Tjugen
3-Apr-2009, 15:12
Being lazy and short on time, I bought one assembled. It is certainly a kludge and pouring the dry powders in slowly is a must, but it is a pleasure to have your developers mixed for you while you do something else.

Get a "proper" one next. Dump in dry chemicals, add water, turn on spinner&heater, leave the darkroom and come back in 20 minutes. That's how I make fixer...

sanking
3-Apr-2009, 15:30
Hot plate stirrers are a real pleasure to use. I picked one up on ebay for less than $40.

Sandy King



Get a "proper" one next. Dump in dry chemicals, add water, turn on spinner&heater, leave the darkroom and come back in 20 minutes. That's how I make fixer...

ScottM
3-Apr-2009, 16:19
I also have been using a magnetic stirrer that I picked up cheap on Feebay. However, I have been wondering if maybe I received a "weak" one. I can barely get a vortex before the magnets lose contact. Is this normal or should they stir with a little more power?

Scott M

xavier deltell
3-Apr-2009, 16:35
Jobo atl-1000 with xtol 1+1

Gary L. Quay
4-Apr-2009, 05:19
HC 110 for stand and semi-stand developing, and for work where I absolutely need consistancy.

Clayton f76+ also for consistancy and sharpness.

Rodinol when I want sharpness with a bit of punch, i.e. cityscapes.

PMK, Pyrocat HD, or W2D2+ for use with my ancient optics, and for anything with lots of clouds. I also like them with some of my night photography.

I'm one of those people who can't settle on a single developer. My pyro use has been decreasing steadily, though. Since I started using a Jobo for all of my Efke and Adox work, I don't have to use a hardening developer. I do a separate hardening bath before the wash since I like to have the option to selenium tone if the negs are too thin. If I don't tone, I use Agfa Sistan for permanence. I started out as a big advocate of Pyro developers, but I've soured on them lately.

John Cahill
4-Apr-2009, 06:58
I'm getting a little tired of mixing powders. I've been using ID-11 and D-76. What do you use and why?

I shoot 4X5:
Delta 100 & 400
HP5+ 400
Tmax 100 & 400

Thanks for any help on this.

********
D23

J D Clark
4-Apr-2009, 09:30
I also have been using a magnetic stirrer that I picked up cheap on Feebay. However, I have been wondering if maybe I received a "weak" one. I can barely get a vortex before the magnets lose contact. Is this normal or should they stir with a little more power?

Scott M

Scott,
This is normal -- I used magnetic stirrers daily for many years as a graduate student in organic chemistry, and they will lose that magnetic "connection" at the higher speeds. It depends on the viscosity of the liquid, many of the liquids stirred are less viscous than water.

In any case, you really don't want a vigorous vortex, that will just mix air (oxygen) into the solution. To get good dissolution of powders into water, you just want the water to be moving around; I use slightly less than a "medium" setting. If there is un-dissolved solids settling around the edges, use a spoon or glass rod to keep the powder from settling.

John Clark
www.johndclark.com

Robert Budding
4-Apr-2009, 14:57
I use XTOL, but I don't mind mixing it a few times a year.

jnantz
4-Apr-2009, 17:46
i use a few different developers depending on what mood i am in ..

sprint film developer ( liquid concentrate kind of like d76 but different )
ansco 130
caffeinolC ( eyeball mixed not measured )
and caffeinolC with ansco 130 added ..

films are aged
usually tmx tmy or trix (400 )
the tmx/tmy were bought just before 9-2001
the trix all expired pre 98

lungovw
4-Apr-2009, 18:18
Some years ago I started a thread asking what would be the choice for one willing to deal with only one developer. Jay-DeFehr proposed his 510Pyro. I tried it and I've been using it ever-since. It seems that everything goes well with 8:30 min at 23C. It is very easy to mix, to use and yet very cheap. The concentrate seems to last forever. WL

Mike Herring
5-Apr-2009, 10:33
I have used many high acutance film developers over the course of the last 35 years.
Sorry to admit it except I am that old. I ran a photo lab in the early 1970s in the US Army. The finest developer I ever experienced was Tetenal Neofin Blue. It came in amber colored glass vials that had to be broken open and it was used highly diluted as a one shot developer. When I used it with Leitz lenses and viewed it through a magnifier under the enlarging lens I was totally amazed. This Rodinal, and Edwal FG7 were all wonderul but I would give the edge to the Tetenal. Beseler began to import the Tetenal developers into the US but I experienced quality issues. The Beseler versions came in amber colored plastic vials and were oxidated before I could even open them. I finally switched to Kodak KC110 - dilution B and found it worked well for my 120 roll films and 4x5 negatives.
I am just starting to shoot black and white 8x10 negatives and I hope some of the experts can give my suggestions. Is Pyrol still highly regarded?
Good luck and happy shooting,
Mike

In defense of Rodinal -- it never was for fine grain. But what grain there is -- is sharp as a tack! It is a high acutance (I hope I spelled that correctly) developer. I have a print made from 35mm tri-x developed in Rodinal 1:100 -- I showed the spocket holes on the print -- they are larger than a 4x5 sheet of film. The image is SHARP! And from a proper viewing distance for a print of this size, the grain is not offensive.

If the subject has smooth gradation of lighting and tone, the grain "blends" nicely. It becomes very visable in contrasty subjects.

At the high dilutions ( which are very easy to mix), Rodnal is great in a rotary processor.

Jan Becket
5-Apr-2009, 23:43
[QUOTE=Sal Santamaura;454488]Ilford Perceptol 1:3. This permits processing in Jobo Expert drums, using continuous agitation, when the tap water and ambient air temperatures are very high here during July through September, for times long enough to ensure even development.

Sal, I had been using exactly the same combination: Perceptol 1:3, Fuji Acros, JOBO with the same N dev. time (9 minutes). It's a great developer, except that six months ago I cam back from an extended shooting trip and ran into huge problems with the A and B stock solutions losing potency, sometimes after just 24 hours. What worked fine with freshly-mixed solutions one day barely brought up an image the very next day. It reminded me of my experiences using Kodak's Extol in the 1-liter size. I wonder if Perceptol has a similar problem.

Anyway, I now have a lot of unused Perceptol boxes and have moved to Pyrocat HD, which has proved consistent and dependable.

Arne Croell
6-Apr-2009, 05:55
I have used many high acutance film developers over the course of the last 35 years.
Sorry to admit it except I am that old. I ran a photo lab in the early 1970s in the US Army. The finest developer I ever experienced was Tetenal Neofin Blue. It came in amber colored glass vials that had to be broken open and it was used highly diluted as a one shot developer. When I used it with Leitz lenses and viewed it through a magnifier under the enlarging lens I was totally amazed. This Rodinal, and Edwal FG7 were all wonderul but I would give the edge to the Tetenal. Beseler began to import the Tetenal developers into the US but I experienced quality issues. The Beseler versions came in amber colored plastic vials and were oxidated before I could even open them. I finally switched to Kodak KC110 - dilution B and found it worked well for my 120 roll films and 4x5 negatives.
I am just starting to shoot black and white 8x10 negatives and I hope some of the experts can give my suggestions. Is Pyrol still highly regarded?
Good luck and happy shooting,
Mike
Mike, Tetenal still makes and sells Neofin blue in Germany, in the glass bottles you describe. It is not imported to the US anymore, however. Great with Agfa APX 25 when that was available, also with Rolleipan 25. Photographers Formulary makes a product that is supposedly similar to the original Neofin blue, but I have not tried it: http://www.photoformulary.com/DesktopModules/StoreProductDetails.aspx?productID=960&tabid=9&tabindex=2&categoryid=31&selection=0&langId=0

Sal Santamaura
6-Apr-2009, 07:31
...I had been using exactly the same combination: Perceptol 1:3...ran into huge problems with the A and B stock solutions losing potency, sometimes after just 24 hours...I wonder if Perceptol has a similar problem...I'm not sure what you're describing. Perceptol, one of the cleanest and most consistent working developers I've encountered, doesn't consist of A and B stock solutions. The two powder packets are mixed in a specified sequence into 750ml of warm water, then water is added to make 1 liter. I've achieved perfect results processing film using Perceptol mixed as long as six months earlier as long as it was kept in full, properly sealed glass bottles.

Armin Seeholzer
6-Apr-2009, 12:01
I use to 97% XTOL and why it works for almost all films including IR Films very good.
1% Rodinal
1% Dektol
1% D76

Joseph O'Neil
6-Apr-2009, 13:04
HC-110
- because....
- I like how it works;
- You can water it way down; exercise good control over your contrast and get great results;
- the stuff keeps forever in pure syrup forum in a sealed bottle;
and lastly....
I bought out the supply of a local camera store that was sold out and shut down, so now I have about 25 bottles of the stuff in my darkroom. It should last me a little while, eh?
:D

Ole Tjugen
6-Apr-2009, 13:25
HC-110
- because....
- I like how it works;
- You can water it way down; exercise good control over your contrast and get great results;
- the stuff keeps forever in pure syrup forum in a sealed bottle;
and lastly....
I bought out the supply of a local camera store that was sold out and shut down, so now I have about 25 bottles of the stuff in my darkroom. It should last me a little while, eh?
:D

That's pretty much exactly the same reasons I use Ilfotec-HC. A bottle of syrup and a syringe for measuring small quantities, and my 10 liters should last me quite a few years. :)

Jehu
7-Apr-2009, 11:38
Thanks for all the good advice and discussion. Since starting this thread I've acquired some HC-110 and some Rodinal. I've used the HC-110 a couple of times and I already prefer it over ID-11 and D-76. The Rodinal came in today. I can't wait to see how it turns out.

Again, thanks for sharing your knowlege and experience. It's very helpful.

Kevin Crisp
7-Apr-2009, 12:50
If you develop three identically exposed sheets of 4x5 TRI-X in Rodinal 1:50, HC 110 Dil "B" and Xtol 1:3 and enlarge them to 16x20, the differences in grain are so slight you can't reliably pick which is which. I did this as a test to see how much worse the Rodinal grain would be and the results surprised me. The Rodinal on very close examination with a magnifying glass appeared to produce grain with sharper edges but it was not "bigger" or more pronounced.

Everybody has their favorites but when you start testing side by side the differences can be little to none. I've always been happy with D76 and thought it was easy to mix, just use really hot water. And for many years I've used HC110 with almost everything except T grain films.

Ash
7-Apr-2009, 14:37
Suprol.

It's cheap.

ki6mf
7-Apr-2009, 19:33
I shoot HP5 and dilute it 1-3. One part water 3 parts water. Normal dev time is 14 minutes with agitation every minute. For compensation developer I use 1:5 dilution with agitation every 2 minutes. My film test indicated ISO is 300. Development times for compensation is 15 minutes! I use a water bath to control temperature and always use 68%. I don't bother with other compensating developers mainly cause these formulas work for me and the most important is to use the same materials and be consistent. A big mistake is to jump between various types of chemistry.

SteveH
7-Apr-2009, 22:13
"I shoot HP5 and dilute it 1-3."

I tried diluting my film once but it just got my camera all wet.:p

"One part water 3 parts water."

I've never tried diluting my water though ;)

Seriously though Ive been shooting TMY at night and using XTOL 1:3 with excellent shadow detail and good highlight control.
Since leaving D76 for the newer developers like TMAX and XTOL I've missed the "chalk and soot" (an expression used by an old photography teacher) tonality of the developers like D76 and Rodinol. XTOL seems to produce a great smooth tonal range and excellent shadow detail but looses the deep richness of dark tones.
Last week, having run out of XTOL I broke out my emergency pack of D76. Mixed 1:1 at standard development produced excellent mid tones but shadows seriously lacking in detail.
After a bit of experimentation I found development regime that mimicks the shadow detail of XTOL but with the richer tonality of D76:
D76 1:1 20 degress C
2 min gentle continuous agitation.
Then agitate 5 sec every 5 minutes for 30 minutes.

Worked a treat

Steve

Steve Gledhill
8-Apr-2009, 00:25
Xtol 1+2 for all TMX and TMY2 @ 24C with continuous agitation in my Jobo. As stock it seems to keep even better than the pack suggests - in totally full bottles. I've used it at 9 months with no observable deterioration. I store the stock in small bottles. One 5 litre stock mix lasts me for about a gross of 5x4 sheets. I mix the 5 litre stock in a 5 litre bottle just adding powder and water as instructed before decanting into my small storage bottles. Simple, quick, clean and very easy.

Jan Becket
12-Apr-2009, 00:39
I'm not sure what you're describing. Perceptol, one of the cleanest and most consistent working developers I've encountered, doesn't consist of A and B stock solutions. The two powder packets are mixed in a specified sequence into 750ml of warm water, then water is added to make 1 liter. I've achieved perfect results processing film using Perceptol mixed as long as six months earlier as long as it was kept in full, properly sealed glass bottles.

Sal, you're correct - Part A and Part B powders are mixed together to make a single liter of stock solution. For me, that single liter, once mixed, becomes unstable and does not retain its potency longer than 24 hours. The first batch of film processes well and then subsequent batches do not. I'm mixing the powder in distilled water and then storing it in two 500 ml amber glass bottles, tightly sealed.

Sal Santamaura
12-Apr-2009, 07:37
Sal, you're correct - Part A and Part B powders are mixed together to make a single liter of stock solution. For me, that single liter, once mixed, becomes unstable and does not retain its potency longer than 24 hours. The first batch of film processes well and then subsequent batches do not. I'm mixing the powder in distilled water and then storing it in two 500 ml amber glass bottles, tightly sealed.Jan, that's how I mix and store it too, with extremely good results even after many months. There seems to be something seriously wrong with the package(s) of Perceptol you've received. I'd contact Ilford for a replacement.

Jan Becket
13-Apr-2009, 02:27
Jan, that's how I mix and store it too, with extremely good results even after many months. There seems to be something seriously wrong with the package(s) of Perceptol you've received. I'd contact Ilford for a replacement.

I agree with the defective product theory, while keeping an open mind about other possibilities although I'm not too sure what they might be. A similar discussion happened around five years ago (on photo.net or rec.photo) about Xtol in the now-discontinued one-liter size, with some people swearing it was all good and others coming up with horror stories.

Maybe some mixtures are more prone to packaging snafus, or maybe I should have walked three times around the Perceptol bottles widdershins while chanting Drofli (Ilford spelled backwards). Anyway, Pyrocat HD is looking good at the moment.

Sal Santamaura
13-Apr-2009, 07:56
...A similar discussion happened around five years ago...about Xtol in the now-discontinued one-liter size, with some people swearing it was all good and others coming up with horror stories...Xtol's failure (when it does happen) is almost certainly related the ascorbate component. Perceptol contains no ascorbate; it's built from very stable ingredients.

ki6mf
13-Apr-2009, 18:55
D 76 mixed 1 part developer to 3 parts water. I go for longer development times, 14 minutes is my normal time, so i don't over develop when having to shorten a N- exposure and get to much development in my highlights. Also I just don't want to constantly have to re test and re learn my basic technique so have always passed on other developers. I think the object lesson is to lean whatever chemistry you like and do not change. Learn the nuances of your setup, take pictures, and don't waste time experimenting with the chemistry of the week!

Jehu
14-Apr-2009, 08:33
Thanks for all the advice. I found that Rodinal is awesome! These two negatives were in the same holder and treated identically except for the developer. The crop is from a very small detail. It's probably less than a centimeter on the negative scanned at 9600 dpi.

Jehu
22-Sep-2009, 13:05
I've found my favorite combination. It's Delta 100 with Rodinal.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2596/3944270323_20edd9684b_b.jpg

I've found that Rodinal doesn't work so well with Tmax 400. It's fine with Tmax 100 and Delta 100 as this shot shows.

William McEwen
22-Sep-2009, 13:16
I developed a roll of Tri-X in Dektol once.

Not intentionally, I assure you.

I don't recommend it.

ki6mf
22-Sep-2009, 16:12
D 76 with HP5 1 part developer to 2 parts Water. Standard development time is 14 minutes for Normal Development. For N+ or N-1, -2,-3 its 2 minutes less/more time per period. For two part developer I dilute D 76 1:5 with 2 minutes agitation and 15 minutes development time this avoids the 2nd water bath. My ISO is 300 on my Pentax V and 200 on my Sekonic DR 758 DR. Grain is not a problem! All chemistry is at 68 degrees.

Why... It works and I would rather spend time taking pictures than experimenting with new chemistry

BetterSense
22-Sep-2009, 17:58
I use diafine a lot for TriX and Neopan 400 roll films for the speed boost without the "pushed" look. I don't expect to get perfect negatives from roll film and it's pretty much idiot proof, fast, doesn't require temperature control and is very cheap.

When I want finer grain or the ability to control development, as well as a more conventional tonal scale, I use a conventional developer which right now is D23. I used to use D76 but D23 is easy to mix up, works very well, and is really cheap when replenished. I get 20-30 rolls out of a liter. It's very easy to mix up and I never run out.

I'm really looking at trying Rodinal now, though. I'm a sucker for a sharp look and that back-to-back test above, along with Rodinal's reputation for sharpness, are luring me. Where can you buy it?

Mark Barendt
22-Sep-2009, 18:07
xtol

Easy to mix.

Easy to replenish.

Great results.

If I were to use anything different as my main it would be HC-110 or Ilfords equivalent.

Jehu
23-Sep-2009, 07:41
Rodinal source:
http://www.mpex.com/browse.cfm/4,12222.html

Brian Ellis
23-Sep-2009, 09:09
D76 1-1. It's an excellent general purpose developer, it's been around for about 100 years IIRC, the longest any film developer has been on the market so I've been told. It also has a good shelf life in concentrated form. Mixing isn't a big deal, I mix a gallon at a time and then store it in a bunch of small bottles that are kept full. I've read a couple articles that made a fairly convincing argument for using it undiluted. But my tests were all done diluting it 1-1 and I didn't feel like re-doing all my tests. If I were starting out from scratch though I'd use it undiluted.

Eric Woodbury
23-Sep-2009, 09:48
I used PMK with HP5+ for 20+ years. It keeps forever and I worked out a process to use it in a JOBO. But I got tired of that and went looking for something else. I like the keeps-forever property and starting with a liquid. I'm switching over to using tubes. I did some testing with Jay's 510 Pyro, but it seemed to lack shadow detail at speed. I found some with some modifications to the developer that I can get speed and shadow detail. Also, I get a bit more separation than PMK. It is still a formula in progress, but I'm encouraged.

MenacingTourist
25-Sep-2009, 11:01
I use Rollo Pyro in jobo expert drums for my sheet and roll film.
Per Volquartz was kind enough to give me a lot of guidance when I was just starting out and I haven't altered a thing in over 5 years.

I shoot mostly Efke 25 and print on Ilford paper. I have a box of Lodima that I'm eager to dig into as well.

The more I read Anchell's Darkroom Cookbook the more I'm interested in mixing my own (of everything) but it will still be some version of what I'm using now.

Have fun,

Alan.

Gregg Cook
25-Sep-2009, 21:29
for what and for why? Thats the nature of it.

Keith Tapscott.
26-Sep-2009, 04:11
D-76 diluted 1+1 for small-tank processing of 135-36, 120 film-rolls and rotation processing of 8x10 film-sheets.
For inversion agitation development of 4x5 film-sheets in a Jobo 2521 tank with a 2509N reel, I have ordered some Champion Promicrol (http://www.firstcall-photographic.co.uk/shop/categories/b-w-film-chemicals/0/champion/champion-promicrol-film-developer-1-litre/#a-specification) which I will use at a dilution of 1+14 for reasons of economy.

Gary L. Quay
26-Sep-2009, 14:56
Although a powder, XTOL mixes more easily than ID-11/D76.

Below is a link to a Kodak chart that lists developer charecteristics:

http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/products/chemistry/bwFilmProcessing/selecting.jhtml?pq-path=14053


I just used Xtol for the first time, and I think the recommendation is a good one. It did mix easy, and I really liked the results.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3430/3950831305_2457c8388e.jpg

BradS
28-Sep-2009, 09:28
I was taught to develop film back in the early 1970's using Kodak D-76 (1+1). In the intervening years, I tried many others. I have returned to D-76 (1+1).

It is clean, stable, reliable, well understood and it just plain works well with everything...and it forgives me my relaxed approach to the technical aspects of this pastime.

cjbroadbent
28-Sep-2009, 15:55
Lately, Ornano Nucleol BF 200, a one-shot 2-component pyrocat developer. It gets me strong negatives for contact printing to argyrotype where midtones have a bad time separating.
Sometimes a staining deveoper, Tanol from Moersch, though it is a bit hard to control.
My staple one-shot has always been HC110 B. No fuss but weaker midtones.

csant
4-Feb-2010, 10:11
I like experimenting - alternatively read that as "I haven't found The One True Developer yet". I have been developing a lot with Tanol, love the fine grain and stain - maybe one of my favourites.

But lately I started getting into some alternative printing (mainly albumen prints right now), and those negatives are not ideal for the job. The above mentioned Nucleol BF200 is my most recent discovery, beautiful strong very fine grained negatives with high acutance.

ki6mf
5-Feb-2010, 14:43
I shoot HP5 and use D 76 for everything. 33% Developer 77% Water for N, N+, and N- development Agitation every minute. For compensating/water bath type situations like N-4 (or more) I use 20 % developer and 80% water with agitation every 2 minutes. I am experimenting using 10@ developer on the back up negatives in extreme n-4 situations. Normal (N) compensating development time is 14 minutes. N- and N+ I vary 2 minutes per each N- time period. N-3 is 8 minutes (3 zones X 2 Minutes each).

mikebarger
5-Feb-2010, 14:57
I don't like two part developers, so I use HC110 and 510 pyro. Happy with both.

Mike