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ajsikel
3-Mar-2009, 07:46
Hi to all of you dear friends.
Ive recently took up LF and fell in love with it. Im trying do do some home development since where I live no one does it. Can you kindly suggest what whoud be the best tank to buy and wher shall I search for them?
or any of you would like to get rid of one uneused or spare?
my regards,

Dennis
3-Mar-2009, 08:32
By tank I take it you don't mean to process in trays but if you do want to process in trays, the best developer tray is a Pyrex glass bread pan. The perfect depth and shape.
Dennis

Gem Singer
3-Mar-2009, 08:43
I am assuming that you are referring to a daylight developing tank for 4X5 sheet film.

There was a Combi-Plan tank outfit for sale on this forum on Feb.22. Not sure whether, or not, it has been sold.

The HP Combi-Plan tank is a good daylight developing tank for sheet film. The price that the seller was asking was reasonable.

Scroll back on the "for sale" section of this forum.

jb7
3-Mar-2009, 08:47
Nikor tank works for me,
but not for everybody-

I didn't like the combi tank at all-

Ron Marshall
3-Mar-2009, 09:04
The Jobo Expert drums, 3010 or 3006 for 4x5, are excellent but expensive.

venchka
3-Mar-2009, 09:04
Best for me. Not everyone will agree.

Jobo 2551/2553 tank, 2509 or 2509n reel, Uniroller or Beseler motor base
Jobo 3010, Uniroller or Beseler motor base

I have both. If I had to pick one to keep, it would be the Jobo 3010.

Good luck.

David A. Goldfarb
3-Mar-2009, 09:14
Among daylight tanks, I like the Nikor sheet film tank, if you can find one at a reasonable price (typically around $130, but I've seen them go for $250).

It's good to learn to develop in trays, which will work with any format, if you decide to try other things down the road.

Deep tanks and hangers are also convenient, if you process enough film to justify maintaining a tank line and have a dark place to set them up.

AJ Edmondson
3-Mar-2009, 09:32
I really like the BTZS tubes because of their economy of chemicals (2 ounces) and temperature stability ( they are floated in a water bath). Many don't care for them because of the film "sticking" to the tube walls but I use a fine TEFLON mesh cut to fit the tube and it allows the chemicals to reach the back of the film. Prior to the tubes I always used tray processing and, aside from having to work in the dark, I was satisfied with the process.

ajsikel
3-Mar-2009, 09:50
Grateful to all of you:)
your ideas really help me., Ive got something to think about and choose from,
I ve heard that the orbital tanks are realy economical, however, hard to find.

CG
3-Mar-2009, 10:33
I like the narrow one gallon stainless 8x10 tanks. It fits all three most common sheet film sizes. It doesn't require 3 1/2 gallons of liquids - just one gallon. It can use "4 up" 4x5 hangers, "2 up" 5x7 hangers and the conventional 8x10 hangers.

Best,

C

ajsikel
3-Mar-2009, 11:22
thanx,
Ive seen some of your suggestions on ebay,
Ill try to search for more info on them.
best

Thebes
3-Mar-2009, 11:38
The problem I see with daylight tanks is they are either cheap, or highly regarded.

I am just getting back into film and 4x5 and don't have my full setup yet, but I used to use about the "worst" one, a Yankee daylight tank, and it worked out fairly well if: I only loaded half of it, I used a diluted developer (D-76 1:1 worked well for me), and I put it into a tray so I could slosh the heck out of it. Some people report they are too slow to fill and empty but I never had that issue. I never did manage to develop more than 6 sheets at a time without problems.

Or, there is expensive. I've rarely heard people complain about the Jobo expert drums... hard to afford that with so much else to buy though.

So, I am wondering what there is that is in the middle. I've thought about the Jobo sheet reel but that seems to require a loading apparatus which is expensive. The Nikon tank is pretty rare. The BTZS tubes look plausible. Probably I'll just get another Yankee and try making some of the tubes down the road...

venchka
3-Mar-2009, 11:50
The problem I see with daylight tanks is they are either cheap, or highly regarded.

I am just getting back into film and 4x5 and don't have my full setup yet, but I used to use about the "worst" one, a Yankee daylight tank, and it worked out fairly well if: I only loaded half of it, I used a diluted developer (D-76 1:1 worked well for me), and I put it into a tray so I could slosh the heck out of it. Some people report they are too slow to fill and empty but I never had that issue. I never did manage to develop more than 6 sheets at a time without problems.

Or, there is expensive. I've rarely heard people complain about the Jobo expert drums... hard to afford that with so much else to buy though.

So, I am wondering what there is that is in the middle. I've thought about the Jobo sheet reel but that seems to require a loading apparatus which is expensive. The Nikon tank is pretty rare. The BTZS tubes look plausible. Probably I'll just get another Yankee and try making some of the tubes down the road...

With practice, I don't think the Jobo loader is required. Like everything else, they turn up on ebay for less than retail. A friend and I stumbled into Jobo 2551 & 2553 tanks for $17 and $8 respectively. 2509 reels extra. The 2551/2553 tank is most verstile. It holds 35mm and 120/220 reels also. In fact, it will hold a 2509, 120/220 and 35mm all at the same time. Worth looking for.

ajsikel
3-Mar-2009, 11:58
With practice, I don't think the Jobo loader is required. Like everything else, they turn up on ebay for less than retail. A friend and I stumbled into Jobo 2551 & 2553 tanks for $17 and $8 respectively. 2509 reels extra. The 2551/2553 tank is most verstile. It holds 35mm and 120/220 reels also. In fact, it will hold a 2509, 120/220 and 35mm all at the same time. Worth looking for.

Thanks Venchka,
thats what I needed:)

babavaga
3-Mar-2009, 12:02
I've taken Paterson Orbital tank. Maybe You'll say - it is for paper develop only, but it works fine for me - no scraches, good sharpness, perfect usability.

http://b0.imgsrc.ru/b/babavaga/2/12716152Ehh.jpg

I prefer to use paterson nor then JOBO tank...

Tim Meisburger
3-Mar-2009, 16:36
I also use the Paterson tank, as it can be loaded in a dark bag or closet, and uses very little chemical. The only time I wished for something different was when I returned from a trip where I had taken 24 shots, and I had to process them four at a time (they had all been fried by the airport x-ray machine!).

If you can dark up a closet, you can also make contact prints like this. Buy a four watt bulb, and an 8x11 sheet of glass (less than a dollar). Take a piece of wood (I used scrap block board) and glue on an 8x10 sheet of that very thin rubber or foam sheet they sell in office supply stores for kids crafts, etc. Take your new contact printer, four negatives and the Orbital into the closet. In the dark (or under a safelight bulb if you have one) open your enlager paper package and take out a sheet then re-close the package. Lay the sheet shiny side up (if its glossy paper) on the foam, lay the four negatives on top of the paper, lay the glass on the negatives, turn on the four watt bulb for about two seconds (depending on your paper), take up the glass and negatives and load the 8x10 paper in the orbital and seal it. Then you can turn on the lights and process your sheet int he orbital just like the negatives. I use two minutes developer, 30 seconds stop and one minute fix. My chemicals are in plastic cups marked for 60ml, and I normally use one set three times for contact sheets before dumping. Hope thats helpful.

Tim Meisburger
3-Mar-2009, 16:38
Easiest place to find a Paterson, if you don't live in the UK, is on ebay UK. Some Chinese company ought to start making these again, as they are super useful and very simple.

Nana Sousa Dias
8-Mar-2009, 16:29
I've tryed a few tanks, Combi plan, jobo reel, trays, etc. The best, for me are the Jobo 3010 Expert tank, very easy to load, you can develop 10 sheets with just 300c.c chemicals (they anounce 210c.c.).

jnantz
8-Mar-2009, 20:43
deep tanks and hangers work well ...

Wade D
10-Mar-2009, 03:12
I have a Yankee Agitank that has worked well for years. No need to over slosh it but it is helpful to put in a tray just in case it spills. I never do over 6 sheets at a time even though it will hold twice that. Before getting it I used to sit in the dark for 25 minutes using open tanks. Not that sitting in the dark is bad but the eyes start creating weird images in the absence of light.;)

Nana Sousa Dias
10-Mar-2009, 05:23
deep tanks and hangers work well ...

It's true, but, you have to spend a lot more chemicals.

tgtaylor
10-Mar-2009, 07:19
Another vote for the Jobo 3010 and 2509N. I've used them both and decided to use the 3010 when quanity warrents it. Unbelieveable quality with a CPA/CPP-2 processor.

Although I haven't used it, there is a "slosher" for developing sheet film that looks good and sells new for around $65.

Thomas

Matus Kalisky
10-Mar-2009, 08:59
I got recently the JOBO 2551 with the 2509N reel. I trained first how to load it with a crap film and then proceeded with processing of 6 sheets. No problem. Even deveopment (I used 500ml, as my developer is Pyrocat HD 1:1:100 and one should have at least 75ml per sheet). I was rolling it on our kitchen working desk. Just if that damn thing would not leak ... (but I bought a used one).

I just got the manual JOBO roller base, but have to try it yet.

al olson
11-Mar-2009, 09:26
I have a NOVA 12x16 vertical slot processor that I use for making prints up to 11x14. Its virtue is that I can make several prints during a session and then cover it up so that the chemicals do not degrade. Each time I use it I replenish about 300 ml of each chemical.

Recently I have been using this processor to develop one at a time 8x10 negatives, but because I am not changing out the chemicals, the films are being developed in Dektol. Results are OK, but...

The point being that these slot processors are very handy for infrequent development of just a few sheets of film.

Hence, I am looking for an 8x10 slot processor that I can dedicate to film development using my preferred D-76 developer. The big photo stores no longer carry slot processors and I cannot find any used ones on ebay. If anyone knows where I can find one cheap ...

kev curry
12-Apr-2009, 08:06
Ive recently started using BTZS tubes after 2 'happy' years of tray development. I would never go back to using trays or any other method. Not that Ive used any other methods but for me they all share the same drawback i.e each batch of film has to be developed for the same time.
If you have a bunch of film that has different contrast requirements your stuck with doing separate runs for exposures that share the same dev times. If you'd shot say 3 negatives on a day out and they were N. N-1. and N+1 you'd have to do them separately when using the methods mentioned, I found that to be a bother. With the tubes you can develop up to 6 sheets of film, all on the same run, and all at different individual development times while using a minimum of chemicals with the water bath keeping the temperature very stable and the lights are on through out, and as already mentioned, each tube holds its own quantity of developer i.e 60ml making everything consistent.

Jeff Scott
12-Apr-2009, 09:01
I have been using the various sized (4x5, 5x7, 8x10) JOBO Expert Drums for years with superb results. :)

bvstaples
12-Apr-2009, 09:33
I use a Paterson Orbital and like it very much. It is tray processing, I can do four sheets at a time, and I rarely come home from a shoot with more than about 12 sheets, so it's about 1-2 hours time to process the film (acceptable to me).

I also have a Yankee Tank which I find a pain in the arse to load and difficult to agitate, though it holds 12 sheets at a time, and I have a couple of Angelus Color Tanks, that hold 8 film hangers at a time. The only drawback to the Angelus tanks (and the Yankee to a lesser extent) is that it takes an enormous amount of chemistry.

Paterson is still in business and doing well; I bet if they brought back the Orbital, even in limited runs, they would sell.


Brian

Jehu
13-Apr-2009, 17:31
I really like the BTZS tubes because of their economy of chemicals (2 ounces) and temperature stability ( they are floated in a water bath). Many don't care for them because of the film "sticking" to the tube walls but I use a fine TEFLON mesh cut to fit the tube and it allows the chemicals to reach the back of the film. Prior to the tubes I always used tray processing and, aside from having to work in the dark, I was satisfied with the process.

I watched a YouTube video on the use of these things. I was impressed so I went and made a set out of ABS sewer pipe. It cost me about $15 for six of them and they've been working great.:D

I'm interested in your teflon mesh trick. Where do you get that stuff?

Michael_4514
13-Apr-2009, 17:38
Unicolor drum and roller base have never let me down.

ki6mf
13-Apr-2009, 18:50
I have used most of the tanks listed except the Nikkor. I believe the Nikkor may be hard to find on the used market. I prefer the Combi I cant complain about these tanks they work and are readily available. I have a couple of Yankee Tanks and would not use them. I don't care for the difficulty of loading the Jobo and they are expensive! Also at least here in the USA Bob Solomon, the distributor, does a great job with support and replacement parts.

shmoo
18-Apr-2009, 16:43
I got recently the JOBO 2551 with the 2509N reel. I trained first how to load it with a crap film and then proceeded with processing of 6 sheets.

I agree with this combo. Just add a Beseler or Unicolor roller base and you're in business! The Jobo 2553 tank has a cog lid which you don't want unless you're getting a Jobo CPP whatever-it-is-that-I-can't-afford unit. ;)

ki6mf
19-Apr-2009, 06:30
Good advice by all posts I think it really comes down to what you like! I tried almost everything and settled on the HP Combi. I do not like the Yankee Daylight tanks as they will leak fluids and cant be inverted!

Kuzano
19-Apr-2009, 10:27
Ive recently started using BTZS tubes after 2 'happy' years of tray development. I would never go back to using trays or any other method. Not that Ive used any other methods but for me they all share the same drawback i.e each batch of film has to be developed for the same time.
If you have a bunch of film that has different contrast requirements your stuck with doing separate runs for exposures that share the same dev times. If you'd shot say 3 negatives on a day out and they were N. N-1. and N+1 you'd have to do them separately when using the methods mentioned, I found that to be a bother. With the tubes you can develop up to 6 sheets of film, all on the same run, and all at different individual development times while using a minimum of chemicals with the water bath keeping the temperature very stable and the lights are on through out, and as already mentioned, each tube holds its own quantity of developer i.e 60ml making everything consistent.

Kuzano
19-Apr-2009, 10:31
Ive recently started using BTZS tubes after 2 'happy' years of tray development. I would never go back to using trays or any other method. Not that Ive used any other methods but for me they all share the same drawback i.e each batch of film has to be developed for the same time.
If you have a bunch of film that has different contrast requirements your stuck with doing separate runs for exposures that share the same dev times. If you'd shot say 3 negatives on a day out and they were N. N-1. and N+1 you'd have to do them separately when using the methods mentioned, I found that to be a bother. With the tubes you can develop up to 6 sheets of film, all on the same run, and all at different individual development times while using a minimum of chemicals with the water bath keeping the temperature very stable and the lights are on through out, and as already mentioned, each tube holds its own quantity of developer i.e 60ml making everything consistent.

I am considering the BTZS tubes. I watched the three YouTube videos and was impressed with the handling of the differing times for development. The demonstrator marked differing development time on the outside of the tubes and pulled each from the "spinning" process as they became due.

I think that's the way I will go. Looked fairly flexible to me. Also like the mesh teflon idea, but he did talk about leaving the film in a position to catch the corner after developing.

PenGun
19-Apr-2009, 11:34
I am considering the BTZS tubes. I watched the three YouTube videos and was impressed with the handling of the differing times for development. The demonstrator marked differing development time on the outside of the tubes and pulled each from the "spinning" process as they became due.

I think that's the way I will go. Looked fairly flexible to me. Also like the mesh teflon idea, but he did talk about leaving the film in a position to catch the corner after developing.

Yeah just shove it in till it's flush. No problem hooking a corner, then a twist in the right direction unsticks it.

You can pull a tube anytime so differing development schemes are pretty easy.

I like the system, it just takes a couple of sessions and you'll never look back. Well for B&W any way. I still don't know how I'm going to do C41.

Derek Kennedy
28-Apr-2009, 12:50
How do you process using the Paterson Orbital time wise? Is the developing times less using the orbital?

Hah! SOrry, didnt notice this was an older thread...but still...if you know the answer...

jnantz
28-Apr-2009, 18:26
deep tanks and hangers work well ...


It's true, but, you have to spend a lot more chemicals.

true, the initial cost of chemicals is a bit more
but you can replenish a tank of developer for a l-o-n-g time
and i maybe be remembering wrong, but i seem to remember
a tank of fixer lasted about 800sheets of 5x7 film.
and then when it is time to mix new ... fresh developer added into "ripened"
makes for the best!

good luck with your decision!

john