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BarryS
25-Jul-2008, 07:00
Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time. :) This just arrived yesterday and I have some questions for anyone familiar with half-plate and/or British view cameras. Does anyone recognize the maker? The only labeling is on the lens, a Lancaster and Sons Anastigmat Rectigraph. At the excellent Wood and Brass web site, I confirmed that the camera looks nothing like any of the cameras built by Lancaster and Sons, and I can't find its match on that site. At one time the camera had a 3/4" disc inset in the back that must have had the maker's name--alas it's gone. The camera is a beautifully made triple extension camera, so I can't believe there would be no record of the maker. It also has a very unique front standard construction that allows rise, fall, and shift of the lensboard independent of the front standard movement.

It came with two bookform plate holders--one in iffy condition, so I'd love to find a few more holders--plate or film. Are there any 5x7 holders that would fit this camera? The back accepts the flanged bookform holders, but the groundglass size is about 5x7. If anyone has some spare holders that might fit, please let me know!

I also need to figure out a way to mount a standard tripod or find some legs that will work with the round cut out bottom design. The design is genius for making the camera lightweight and letting it fold with the lens, but if the original legs are lost, it makes things a little more complicated.

My original intention was to use this as a wet plate camera, but I'm not sure I want to be dripping silver nitrate on this guy. Maybe it would be easier to just find and adapt a straight 5x7 back.

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/5377/halfplate1hl8.jpg

http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/1938/604524006xd7.jpg

Bill_1856
25-Jul-2008, 07:05
"At the excellent Wood and Brass web site..."

What is this?

BarryS
25-Jul-2008, 07:11
"At the excellent Wood and Brass web site..."

What is this?

Hey, you're supposed to be helping *me* out. :)

http://www.woodandbrass.co.uk/

IanG
25-Jul-2008, 07:12
The fittings look vaguely familiar, and they make me think it's possibly made in India.

Looks very nice, your right to good to spoil. Great camera.

Ian

wfwhitaker
25-Jul-2008, 07:20
Half a fool. That's why I stick to whole plate. ;)

That's a beautiful camera, whatever it is.

Ernest Purdum
25-Jul-2008, 07:42
I have some good 1/2-plate holders with cutfilm adapters. I'll send you a sample to try if you email me your mailing address. These were never standardized, but sometimes can be made to work without too much trouble.

Martin Courtenay-Blake
25-Jul-2008, 07:43
The quality of manufacture and the appearance of lightness would possibly suggest Thornton Pickard or Houghton, both of whom used circular ivory nameplates. However, the design and finish of the metalwork and overall condition would point to a more recent date of manufacture. Ian has suggested India where a lot of "English Style" large format cameras were made. Either that or a beautiful restoration and upgrade.

Whoever built it one cannot deny it is a beautiful camera. Good luck with the legs.

Martin

IanG
25-Jul-2008, 08:01
The reason I suggested possibly India is two cameras I was watching on Ebay about 2 moths ago. They were Indian built wide format cameras, rather odd formats but the hardware was quite similar and not like I've seen on a UK made camera.

Ian

BarryS
25-Jul-2008, 08:11
India? Interesting, I never would have thought that because I'm only familiar with some fairly crude copies and the construction and finish on this is very fine--better than my Deardorff in fact. Can you point me to any photos of finely-crafted Indian cameras from that era?

Ernest--Thanks, I'll email you.

Another view--

http://img206.imageshack.us/img206/4703/604524003li9.jpg

Walter Calahan
25-Jul-2008, 08:55
A very smart fool would. HA!

A beauty.

Bill_1856
25-Jul-2008, 09:20
My immediate throught was that it has the "persona" of a Gandolfi, although it differs significantly from the post-WW2 half-plate model that I had a few years ago. It's certainly beautiful!
(Also, thanks for the link.)

Scott Davis
25-Jul-2008, 09:32
Barry- if you want to use film holders with it, or any other plate holders for that matter other than the ones that came with it, you'd be best off just making a new back to fit it since the bookform holders are most likely proprietary to the camera in question and anything else will require adapting/modification to either the camera or the holders or both to make them work together. You could ask someone like Alan Brubaker to make more holders to fit it, but that's the slow and time-consuming (and expensive) solution.

Ole Tjugen
25-Jul-2008, 09:47
My immediate throught was that it has the "persona" of a Gandolfi, although it differs significantly from the post-WW2 half-plate model that I had a few years ago. It's certainly beautiful!
(Also, thanks for the link.)

It doesn't look at all like a Gandolfi to me - the controls are different, the lens panel movements are different, the rear standard brackets are different, ...

It's beautiful, but not a Gandolfi (I have 4 1/2 Gandolfis at the moment, including one of each main design)...

BarryS
25-Jul-2008, 13:05
Yes, I checked all the usual suspects, including Gandolfi, but couldn't find anything that matched. I wonder what's the last manufacturing date for bookform half-plate cameras. The nickel-plated brass might also put it later than some of the classic British plate cameras--they seem to have mostly brass-colored hardware. When do you see the earliest instances of nickel-plated brass on view cameras? Could this be from the late teens or twenties? Could it have been a 5x7 camera with either 5x7 or half-plate backs available?

Scott-- Having holders made sounds pretty expensive, so I'm hoping the sample Ernest sends me fits--even with some modification. Plan B is to modify a 5x7 back, but it won't be as pretty as the camera--especially with my woodwork skills.

Ernest Purdum
26-Jul-2008, 11:58
The last date I know of for cameras of this type still being made was 1971, but I'm guessing some were made even later.

So many makers are involved that I think it would be very difficult to establish a starting date for nickel-plate.

The nice thing about Plan B is that you can always replace the original back for look pretty purposes.

Ole Tjugen
26-Jul-2008, 12:55
The russians didn't make half-plate cameras, but I believe production of 13x18cm and 18x24cm plate cameras based on the German turn-of-the-century "Reisekamera" design continued well into the 1990's, with nickel-plated metal parts.

The one in question here is definitely not one of those, though. The quality of workmanship is classes different from the Russian "good enough for government work" approach. Especially the finials on the front standard metalwork looks very Indian to me...

Bernard Kaye
26-Jul-2008, 17:17
See the lining-up of screw heads on brass on sides and front (lens board) "surrounds." I see that on ICA double wood, aluminum reinforced, plate holders but not on successor Zeiss-Ikon units. I see an early German influence, also found on New England made units.. Bernie Kaye

Bernard Kaye
26-Jul-2008, 17:48
The locking lugs on front are not round knobs, they are like locking lugs on earier 1940s M1-Garand Rifle rear sight but here I can see where their locking position could be paralled to the slot that moves up and down, perhaps not as secure as a round locking knob, as in rear unless there is a round washer under them. Bernie

E. von Hoegh
26-Jul-2008, 18:39
See the lining-up of screw heads on brass on sides and front (lens board) "surrounds." I see that on ICA double wood, aluminum reinforced, plate holders but not on successor Zeiss-Ikon units. I see an early German influence, also found on New England made units.. Bernie Kaye

Good eye. The alignment of screw slots is a hallmark of fine guns, (Not so easy with metal, but I used to do it when screwing planks to ribs when I was building cedar-strip canoes) and some very fine watches had the screw slots aligned.

That is a lovely looking camera! I'm a fool, as I'd buy it in a heartbeat!.

Ole Tjugen
27-Jul-2008, 06:02
Oddly enough my 1980-ish Gandolfi Traditional has aligned screw slots, but the 1920-ish Gandolfi Universal does not.

But all that really says is that Alfred was very particular about lining them up, while Louis was not. :)

Bernard Kaye
27-Jul-2008, 10:49
A guess: the front standard was customized by a user or his good selection of craftsperson. Note absence of a shiny horizontal strip of metal on top to insure that spacing of top of front standard does not vary. Of course, people in this quorum are not collectors but I think that BarryS should sleep with this, at least for a while. Bernie Kaye

BarryS
27-Jul-2008, 19:54
Some interesting observations. All the screws do seem to be aligned except in some obvious instances where screws were removed and replaced. I had no idea that plate cameras were manufactured relatively recently. I still am unable to positively match any of the hardware to any other makers or cameras. There are many similarities to early British view cameras, but that's as far as the trail goes. I've attached some more photos in the hope that someone recognizes a distinctive bit of hardware or design element. I'm starting to develop a fixation with identifying this camera. :)

http://img244.imageshack.us/img244/5986/halfplate1ne8.jpg

http://img329.imageshack.us/img329/3597/halfplate2zf2.jpg

http://img70.imageshack.us/img70/5561/halfplate3xz5.jpg

BarryS
27-Jul-2008, 19:54
http://img329.imageshack.us/img329/3846/halfplate4ay5.jpg

http://img295.imageshack.us/img295/6497/halfplate5tw2.jpg

http://img295.imageshack.us/img295/4413/halfplate6ad5.jpg

http://img373.imageshack.us/img373/9092/halfplate7qa4.jpg

E. von Hoegh
27-Jul-2008, 20:18
Well it looks like it has a Thornton-Pickard rollerblind shutter behind the lens.

Otherwise, still a lovely piece of work.
And I agree that it may have been modified at some time..

Robert999
28-Aug-2008, 19:01
The camera doesn't have too many similarities, but the bookform holders DO seem quite similar to the ones that came with my WW I Gandolfi Universal half-plate, down to some of the brasswork pieces. If you could post one or two more of them...

BarryS
28-Aug-2008, 19:50
The camera doesn't have too many similarities, but the bookform holders DO seem quite similar to the ones that came with my WW I Gandolfi Universal half-plate, down to some of the brasswork pieces. If you could post one or two more of them...

Perhaps they'd fit your Gandolfi better than my mystery camera. I've found there are a lot of variations of bookform half-plate holders--all slightly different sizes. The holders that came with my camera are a good, but not perfect fit. Unfortunately, they're in unusable shape due to warping and damage. Thanks to some generous forum members, I have two perfectly fitting holders (see one pictured below) and some slightly small holders in good shape that I hope to modify to work with the camera. The basic design of many half plate bookform holders is remarkably similar--but alas not the size.

http://img240.imageshack.us/img240/5798/halfplate1527ry4.jpg

Gene McCluney
29-Aug-2008, 10:10
Your camera is equipped with a reversable back, which means it easily comes off. It is a simple task to adapt a back from a salvage 5x7 camera, and that is what I would do, and actually DID do for a Toyo metal half-plate field camera, and it has become my workhorse for my field photography. This would not damage your camera in any way, as the original back would be easily installed in an instant.

BarryS
29-Aug-2008, 11:04
Gene--that's exactly what I'm planning on doing. I'd still like to shoot some half-plate film now and then using the camera in its original form, but I'm on the lookout for a 5X7 back that I can adapt.

Sandeha
29-Aug-2008, 11:21
I suspect that Vageeswari copied Houghton for many aspects of structural design and metalwork.

The focus knobs are very similar to my Houghton whole plate, but the fittings on the front standard look much more like one of the Vageeswari's I've seen.

Mine doesn't have the original back, but it works a darn sight better for that !! I bought the camera with a Kodak whole plate spring back that must have been fitted 20+ years after the camera was first made. You can see here how I filled the base of mine ... http://www.sandehalynch.com/restoration.htm

BarryS
29-Aug-2008, 11:56
Sandeha-- I'm familiar with your page from my research and you did a beautiful job with that Triple Victo. The way you filled in the base is nicely done. I've been hunting for some Crown Graflex tripod legs to see if I can modify them to attach to the brass turntable. Ideally, I'd like to keep the camera unmodified--or at least make the modifications easily reversible.

As to the identity, I don't think it's a Vageeswari or any other Indian camera. The hardware seems consistent with British camera makers. From what I understand, there were British hardware vendors that sold stock to different camera makers, so you can sometimes find identical brass hardware on cameras from different makers.

Sean, the admin on APUG, has a half-plate camera (mis)identified as a Thornton Pickard Imperial Triple Extension and despite some significant differences--it may be from the same maker as my camera. At the very least, it shares some hardware. There's a chance the maker could be W. Butcher & Sons--which eventually merged with Houghton's in 1915.

http://www.apug.org/forums/forum192/26243-my-new-baby-new-forum.html

Sandeha
30-Aug-2008, 04:24
Barry, you might well be able to use a bolt-on base with a regular tripod thread - perhaps something that clips to the brass ring or the slots. Quite a good idea, since you still have the metalwork in place - mine had been stripped out.

"From what I understand, there were British hardware vendors that sold stock to different camera makers, so you can sometimes find identical brass hardware on cameras from different makers."

That's interestingly put ... while mine is identical to any Triple Victo I've seen pictures of, perhaps it's not a Houghton. The 'ivory' disk states "Gerard & Co, 7 South St, London E.C." which I'd assumed to be the dealer's tag - I've had a number of German folder cameras with metal tags attached that give the shop where it was first sold ... but I don't know.

(Glad my pages were useful !!)

Martin Courtenay-Blake
30-Aug-2008, 06:39
My original thoughts at the beginning of the thread were pointing towards T-P or Houghton-Butcher. Bearing in mind that Houghtons also incorporated Marrion (i.e. Soho) and a few other makers I still think that a Houghton design was the basis of this camera.

Sandeha, I believe, may be the closest as all the VCW (Vageeswari) cameras I have seen have all had nickel plated brass hardware and the lens mount treatment similar to the beast in question. The only real doubt in my mind about Vageeswari is that the hardware is not quite as "decorative" as I would have expected and is much more in keeping with a British built camera.

It could, of course, be a one off special built either a known maker or even a skilled enthusiast. I have a recent reprint of a book, originally published in 1901 with plans and construction details for a range of cameras and even a T-P / Kershaw style shutter. I'm sure this was not the only book available at the time.

Martin

Bernard Kaye
30-Aug-2008, 17:03
If the two flat elongated locking knobs on both sides of the front were round like the others, therefore of larger/wider diameter, would it close? Is there is a reason for not using round locking knobs in front having to do with design of camera; did many of these cameras use flat knobs in front on both sides, round knobs elsewhere? Bernie

SBruce
5-Sep-2008, 10:08
India? Interesting, I never would have thought that because I'm only familiar with some fairly crude copies and the construction and finish on this is very fine--better than my Deardorff in fact. Can you point me to any photos of finely-crafted Indian cameras from that era?

Ernest--Thanks, I'll email you.

Another view--

http://img206.imageshack.us/img206/4703/604524003li9.jpg

that is a BEAUIFUL camera!! mine isn't in such great condition. i need to buy a new one.

Rafael Garcia
5-Sep-2008, 14:20
Could be Japanese like mine. Mine is an Asanuma King 1, probably a Nagaoke predecessor made in the 1930's Japan. I made 5x7 and 4x5 backs for it easily.

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/eager.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/myholder.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/5x7.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/4x5.jpg


It is a very good camera, costing $140.00 A smart fool buys a half-plate! camera!

Michael Carter
1-Apr-2009, 08:37
The same kind that buys 10x12, and other sizes. There is one on Ebay now, April 1, no fooling, 120391152990. However, my purchases were from India direct. One does have a label on it Vageeswari. There is a factory that closed and old stock is being sold off according to the seller. One more is being shipped and is in transit, 10x15 I just opened a box this morning, 10x12 and 6 1/2x12 with tripod and plate holder each. The 10x12 doesn't need a tripod as it has a solid base, the other ones have special legs for the circular fitting.

Archphoto
1-Apr-2009, 14:04
An other old thread comming alive again......

These camera's are so beautifull, so full of history of their own.

I wonder if Sandeha is still around and if he has fiixed his tripod mounting problem: I have an idea...

Got my self a Shen Hoa 4x5 to complement my Sinar P2 and still have to restore an old 5x7 wood with a broken bellows and a lot more problems.

Peter

Steve Hamley
1-Apr-2009, 17:18
Who wouldn't want to buy one of these ...

Cheers, Steve

Paul Ewins
1-Apr-2009, 17:40
Michael,
I bought a couple of the Vageeswari cameras from John Alex a few months back - a 6.5x15 and an 8.5x15. Mine are serviceable but look to be 40+years old and well used. I made the usual eBay mistake, low bids on both hoping to get one and ended up getting both. The interesting thing is that although they use the same back and bellows there are differences in the hardware holding the lensboards on and the lens boards are a different size. With a few minor mods my 8.5x15 now takes cambo boards and as soon as I work out the best way of putting film into plate holders I'll take some test shots.

Archphoto
1-Apr-2009, 18:00
Steve: wow............
Did you do the restauration yourself or did you buy it in this shape, it looks stunning !

Peter

Steve Hamley
1-Apr-2009, 18:46
Peter,

It's an original Eastman #2. More importantly, it's a ''tight" camera, not worn or loose. And a very pleasant surprise was that it uses regular 6" 2D lens boards.

Cheers, Steve

Oops! I misread the title! Mines a whole plate!

Michael Carter
1-Apr-2009, 19:04
Michael,
I bought a couple of the Vageeswari cameras from John Alex a few months back - a 6.5x15 and an 8.5x15. Mine are serviceable but look to be 40+years old and well used. I made the usual eBay mistake, low bids on both hoping to get one and ended up getting both. The interesting thing is that although they use the same back and bellows there are differences in the hardware holding the lensboards on and the lens boards are a different size. With a few minor mods my 8.5x15 now takes cambo boards and as soon as I work out the best way of putting film into plate holders I'll take some test shots.

Yep, that is him. He told me he is getting some smaller ones in if anyone is interested. Smaller is smaller than 8x10 or 10x12 I suppose. He has a store on ebay:

http://stores.ebay.com/collectible-camera-n-lens_W0QQssPageNameZstrkQ3amefsxQ3asstQQtZkm

Math
4-Apr-2009, 10:19
Not trying to advertise, as it's not mine, but this seems like a nice 5x7" back for such a camera. If the dimensions are correct, it would even fit without modification!
[Link] (http://cgi.ebay.com/5x7-Wooden-Back-w-Groundglass-hood_W0QQitemZ270366744105)

Michael Carter
19-May-2009, 12:46
Hello again,
If this thread is still alive could someone help me get a lens / shutter for a Vageeswari? The lens board hole is 4 1/2 inches across and has 6 screw holes around it.
Thanks
Michael Carter

Michael Finder
20-May-2009, 23:13
Michael,
I bought a couple of the Vageeswari cameras from John Alex a few months back - a 6.5x15 and an 8.5x15. ..........as soon as I work out the best way of putting film into plate holders I'll take some test shots.

Hi Paul, Just found this thread. I recently purchased an 8x10 Vageeswari wood field camera and 8x10 book style plate holder from John Alex.

I have not used film yet, however I have shot onto photographic paper which produces a paper negative suitable for contact printing or scanning.

Method: I insert an 8x10 grey card about 2-3 mm thick into the plate holder, then insert the photographic paper on top and close the holder. I suppose a piece of matt board would also work. It works like a charm.

There was a guy in France who sold these plate holders and he recommended using a piece of thick black polycarbonate sheet (glass plate thickness).

Cheers Michael.

Michael Finder
24-May-2009, 19:24
Could be Japanese like mine. Mine is an Asanuma King 1, probably a Nagaoke predecessor made in the 1930's Japan. I made 5x7 and 4x5 backs for it easily.

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/eager.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/myholder.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/5x7.jpg

http://i67.photobucket.com/albums/h285/ragc01/4x5.jpg


It is a very good camera, costing $140.00 A smart fool buys a half-plate! camera!


Hi Rafael, Michael Finder again. Thanks for the information on the tripod mounting. How difficult was it to make different backs for your field camera? I really like the look of your backs. My 8x10 Vageeswari hardware looks very similar to your Asanuma. I'd like to make some reducing backs for it. Any advice appreciated. Cheers Michael.

John T
24-May-2009, 19:54
One thing that might indicate an Indian camera is that the metalwork is surface mounted not flush. On many cameras, like the Asanuma, some of the metal is surface mounted, but a lot of it is inset into the body. This extra step is also a source of pride in the manufacturing. I haven't seen a confirmed Indian camera that has the inset metalwork. (Although this is based on a relatively small sampling)

Michael Carter
28-May-2009, 18:29
My Vageeswari 8x15 has both. Brackets to hold GG are surface mounted, while corners are reinforced with flush brass. That was one of the things that impressed me with Indian cameras.
I have a J camera that has rough gears; it jumps. Not smooth like a Vag.

Archphoto
29-May-2009, 03:15
@Michael: it sounds to me that the ax has too much play, if you can push the ax down
more, the jumping will have ended.

Peter

Brian Ellis
29-May-2009, 09:25
If you're really obsessed (and I would be too, it's such a beautiful camera), what about sending the pictures to Eastman House and see what they might say? I think they have a big collection of older cameras and there must be someone there who'd be willing to take a look. Or maybe there are better places, I'm not into old cameras myself so I'm not up on the best source for something like this but there must be other places besides this forum.

Walnutgrip
27-Jan-2014, 06:21
This camera would be a Butcher and son eventually taken over by Houghtons Known as the 'National'

Regular Rod
27-Jan-2014, 10:35
Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time. :) This just arrived yesterday and I have some questions for anyone familiar with half-plate and/or British view cameras. Does anyone recognize the maker? The only labeling is on the lens, a Lancaster and Sons Anastigmat Rectigraph. At the excellent Wood and Brass web site, I confirmed that the camera looks nothing like any of the cameras built by Lancaster and Sons, and I can't find its match on that site. At one time the camera had a 3/4" disc inset in the back that must have had the maker's name--alas it's gone. The camera is a beautifully made triple extension camera, so I can't believe there would be no record of the maker. It also has a very unique front standard construction that allows rise, fall, and shift of the lensboard independent of the front standard movement.

It came with two bookform plate holders--one in iffy condition, so I'd love to find a few more holders--plate or film. Are there any 5x7 holders that would fit this camera? The back accepts the flanged bookform holders, but the groundglass size is about 5x7. If anyone has some spare holders that might fit, please let me know!

I also need to figure out a way to mount a standard tripod or find some legs that will work with the round cut out bottom design. The design is genius for making the camera lightweight and letting it fold with the lens, but if the original legs are lost, it makes things a little more complicated.

My original intention was to use this as a wet plate camera, but I'm not sure I want to be dripping silver nitrate on this guy. Maybe it would be easier to just find and adapt a straight 5x7 back.

http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/5377/halfplate1hl8.jpg

http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/1938/604524006xd7.jpg

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2747/4420381315_23bbf439fd_o.jpg

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pukeariki/4420381315/

Thornton Pickard?

RR

Walnutgrip
27-Jan-2014, 12:05
No its not a T/P it is in fact A Houghtons 'The Duchess' these were made between 1906-1920. However the shutter is a T/P

C. D. Keth
27-Jan-2014, 13:06
You guys know this is 5 years old, right?

Andrew Plume
27-Jan-2014, 14:11
yep why not

plenty of people still use these, y'know

andrew

Tin Can
27-Jan-2014, 14:18
Nothing is old these days, and most LFF vets always tell us to search the past.

I bought a misrepresented 1/2 plate Kodak Police camera, all black, and I am very happy with my 'find'.


You guys know this is 5 years old, right?

IanG
30-Jan-2014, 13:42
http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2747/4420381315_23bbf439fd_o.jpg

http://www.flickr.com/photos/pukeariki/4420381315/

Thornton Pickard?

RR


No it's a Houghton Duchess with a Thornton Pickard shutter, just like mine.

http://www.lostlabours.co.uk/photography/cameras/images/hp0024.jpg

Manufactured between 1906 & 1920 by Houghtons Ltd of High Holborn, London, the "Duchess" camera was part of a range that included the "King", "Queen", "Empress", "Victo", "Victo-Superb", and "Tropical Victo". Houghtons also made Sanderson cameras.

Ian

Michael Cienfuegos
31-Jan-2014, 12:48
Why can't I ever find goodies like that? All I ever find are refugees from the scrap heap. :(



m

IanG
1-Feb-2014, 09:27
I have another 3 or 4 half plate, whole plate and larger to finish restoring. None cost much 20-70 ($32-$132),they are arouind if you look in the right places.

Ian

BarryS
1-Feb-2014, 14:04
This camera would be a Butcher and son eventually taken over by Houghtons Known as the 'National'

Yes, that's the closest I've come to an accurate identification. Although I was never able to find the exact model in any catalog, this version of the Butcher's National is fairly close.

http://imageshack.com/a/img842/2636/qg38.jpg

Walnutgrip
2-Feb-2014, 02:36
109691109691 Try this one from my collection.109691
Yes, that's the closest I've come to an accurate identification. Although I was never able to find the exact model in any catalog, this version of the Butcher's National is fairly close.

http://imageshack.com/a/img842/2636/qg38.jpg

Andrew Plume
2-Feb-2014, 03:06
I have another 3 or 4 half plate, whole plate and larger to finish restoring. None cost much 20-70 ($32-$132),they are arouind if you look in the right places.

Ian

I think Ian meant, yes, they're around in the UK (for restoration) but not in the US, unless you buy one for restoration from the auction site

andrew

IanG
2-Feb-2014, 03:53
Yes, that's the closest I've come to an accurate identification. Although I was never able to find the exact model in any catalog, this version of the Butcher's National is fairly close.

http://imageshack.com/a/img842/2636/qg38.jpg

It doesn't look like a Butcher camera to me. Butcher didn't make cameras themselves though they subcontracted to other workshops inc Houghton, that one looks like it's possibly a copy because of the Nickle plated parts. Try searching this website (http://www.earlyphotography.co.uk).

It can be difficult accurately identifying British cameras because many were sold in kit form and made to order. There's something reminiscent of Thornton Pickard/Billcliffe in this cameras style.

Ian