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View Full Version : popped my LF cherry...



pplpilot
6-May-2008, 08:33
just got my first slide back, and Iím quite pleased... looking forward to the learning curve.

Not the greatest of image ill agree but for my very first shot of 5x4 i donít think its too bad, just spending some time getting to know the format. just one question some of you may be able to help with, Iíve had a print done (by hand cibachrome) and its slightly disappointing, its far more contrast than the slide and has lost some of that 'punch' and detail in the shadows has took a hit, how can i over come this or is this the nature of a print from velvia? If Iím going to go print is it worth using a less punchy film, provia or the like perhaps?


Shen hao, schneider super symmar 150 5.6 , Velvia, 1/4 f22, unfiltered


http://www.pbase.com/pplpilot/image/96458928.jpg

Bryan Lemasters
6-May-2008, 10:02
You might give Fuji Astia a try.

Years ago their was a gentleman in Florida who was marketing a developer that allowed you to vary the contrast on Ilfochrome - the guy's name escapes me at the moment. It worked fairly well, as I recall, but I have no idea if he is still in business.


Bryan

Ron Marshall
6-May-2008, 10:36
Very nice! You'll get a much better tonal range from Astia, or you could use a neg film such as Fuji Pro 160 or Porta 160.

QT Luong
6-May-2008, 10:38
That's a nature of a cibachrome that is not done with the upmost care. For color, nowadays digital printing is the way to go.

Bill_1856
6-May-2008, 11:55
Ilfochrome (Cibachrome) first developer is ordinary B&W developer (Dektol works fine). If you need to control excessive contrast just use some Selectol Soft.

Geert
6-May-2008, 13:53
You don't say if you used the beloved 50 ASA or the 100 ASA (100F) version.

My findings are that Velvia 100F is just bad on the brown tones. Provia RDP III gives a more pleasing result for general nature photography (not sunsets or spectacular skies in red or orange tones)
Please don't take this for granted for others might suggest the opposite. It's just my opinion.

I must admit that the brown tones in your image look quite good, but it's probably for the lack of 'shadow brown' dark tones.
For a shot on Velvia, the blue sky is dissapointing. Filtering could add.

The first attached image (landscape) was made on Velvia 100F with a Polarizing filter, with an old uncoated Angulon 120mm. The portrait oriented image was taken on Velvia 100F with a really good Sinaron MC 210mm without filter.

G

jetcode
6-May-2008, 15:36
The first attached image (landscape) was made on Velvia 100F with a Polarizing filter, with an old uncoated Angulon 120mm. The portrait oriented image was taken on Velvia 100F with a really good Sinaron MC 210mm without filter.

G

I'm not sure that is a valid comparison due to the polarizer and different lenses used. I think a more revealing example could be made in a side by side comparison using the same equipment and the same scene with exposures less than 10 minutes apart.

Nick Kanellos
7-May-2008, 12:20
... just one question some of you may be able to help with, I’ve had a print done (by hand cibachrome) and its slightly disappointing, its far more contrast than the slide and has lost some of that 'punch' and detail in the shadows has took a hit, how can i over come this or is this the nature of a print from velvia? If I’m going to go print is it worth using a less punchy film, provia or the like perhaps?


Another approach you can take, one used extensively by Christopher Burkett who prints exclusively on Cibachrome, is to use a mask to reduce the contrast of your transparency. The mask is essentially a piece of B&W negative film exposed in register with the transparency. You'll want it to be relatively thin and low contrast. You can experiment with different contrasts and densities, or even number masks, to get the tonal range you want in your print. After you've processed and dried your mask, place it back in register with the transparency and print as you would normally.

A good film to use to make your masks is Ilford's Ortho, which you can use under a red safelight. I use Ilford's Ortho to make unsharp masks for some of my too-contrasty negs. I process Ortho in a tray under the safelight using paper developer.

Ilford has printed a short guide describing the process in greater detail. A few years ago I called them up and they sent me a copy. Since they still make Cibachrome, I guess they still print the guide.

Hope this helps.

Clay Turtle
28-Jul-2008, 16:59
Johnny come lately but I did happen upon this site which deals with printing color paper with P3 chemistry.http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4792518.html Silver halide color reversal reflection print sensitive material . . alternative processing & printing.

Capocheny
28-Jul-2008, 17:52
Welcome to the club... the journey is challenging but the results make it all worthwhile!

Check out the excellent article on "Masking Strategies" by Lynn Radeka in the current issue of View Camera.

Cheers