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View Full Version : FP4+ in Jobo 3010 drum with D76 1:1 processing time



Scott Kathe
15-Mar-2008, 10:00
I just did my first 4x5 FP4+, rated at 100, in a Jobo 3010 with a 5 minute pre-rinse with water (500ml) on a Beseler non reversing base. Then 9 minutes in D76 diluted 1:1 (500ml:500ml), turned the drum around every minute. Two minutes in water (500ml) to stop. Five minutes in Kodak Rapid Fix-no hardener (1 liter). Two minutes in water (500ml). Two minutes in Permawash (500ml). Two minutes in water (500ml) then into a Gravity Works film washer for 15 minutes. PhotoFlo then hung up to dry. Seemed to work well but my film speed test in tray rated FP4+ at 100 so that is how I shot the film. WAAAY to much contrast when processed in the Jobo. Time for another film speed test.

The film speed came out at 100 again and there looks to be plenty of detail in the shadows but the highlights are nearly blown out. I'm thinking about trying 7 minutes instead of 9, any thoughts?

Scott

Skorzen
15-Mar-2008, 10:32
Hi Scott,

I had similar results with a 3010 shooting TMY and souping in Rodinal. Massive dev chart said 10 min 1:50, after testing I found that 5 min was still a bit contrasty so I went to 1:100 for 8 min. That was good in the tests, but I think I may do some more testing as a few negs I shot recently didn't have the contrast I would have liked. I was printing on Slavich grade 3 as well which has a reputation for being contrasty.

So yeah I guess my suggestion would be to do some more testing, film speed should be fine but you dev times are going to change.

Paul Ewins
15-Mar-2008, 15:12
The usual manufacturer recommendation is to cut times by 15% when going from tank processing to rotary processing.

Scott Kathe
15-Mar-2008, 16:18
The usual manufacturer recommendation is to cut times by 15% when going from tank processing to rotary processing.

I was going from tray processing where times are cut 15% so that's 11 minutes, intermittent agitation, down to about 9 due to tray processing. With a presoak in the Jobo drums others have used the same time they use for tray processing-at least that's what I've found online.

Scott

Gary Samson
15-Mar-2008, 17:25
I would suggest cutting your time by 25% from the original 11 minutes. This has work well for me with a variety of developers when starting from intermittent agitation time recommendations. Constant agitation is going to build up highlight detail very quickly. Might I also suggest that you give Pyrocat HD a try with Ilford FP4+. This developer and film are a great combination. Good luck.

Scott Kathe
16-Mar-2008, 07:22
Might I also suggest that you give Pyrocat HD a try with Ilford FP4+. This developer and film are a great combination. Good luck.

Does this combination scan well? I use an Epson 4990 to make 8x10s and maybe an 11x14. I'm trying to stick with one film and one developer and I've thought more about trying HP5+ with D76 1:1 as a next step. I shoot mostly nature/landscape.

Scott

Gary Samson
16-Mar-2008, 12:16
Does this combination scan well? I use an Epson 4990 to make 8x10s and maybe an 11x14. I'm trying to stick with one film and one developer and I've thought more about trying HP5+ with D76 1:1 as a next step. I shoot mostly nature/landscape.

Scott

Scott,
Yes I have found that Ilford FP4+ negatives developed in Pyrocat do scan very well. I am using an Epson V750 scanner for my work. You will not be disappointed with this combination as long as you get the development time right for the exposure index you are using for that film.

Scott Kathe
4-Apr-2008, 10:39
After some more testing and densitometry I've come up with a time of 6 1/2 minutes with FP4+ shot at 100. I also used the View Camera Store film test kit and they suggest shooting at 80 and developing for 5 1/2 minutes.

These development times seem to be pretty short and I'd like to develop for about 8 minutes. The only way to do that would be to up my dilution of D76 past 1:1. I'm reluctant to do that since the capacity of 1 liter of D76 1:1 is only 8 sheets and the drum holds 10. If I up the dilution more that will be less than 8 sheets in the drum. Can anyone suggest a different developer with a higher capacity that develops a bit slower? That being said I'm not interested in endless testing and magic bullet chasing.

Scott

Richard Littlewood
6-Apr-2008, 11:38
Just developed a dozen sheets of FP4 in a jobo rated around 80asa, 2 min pre soak, then ID-11 at 1+2 dilution for 9.5 mins @20c. I thought the negs looked well exposed and ever so slightly rich, but very tonal.

Scott Kathe
7-Apr-2008, 06:43
The most recent images I developed I shot at 80 and developed for 5 1/2 minutes and they look pretty good. Fred at the View Camera Store wants me to try D76 1:3 so I can develop longer but as it is according to Kodak I can only do 8 sheets of 4x5 with 1 liter of D76 1:1. If I go to 1:3 I can only do 5 sheets in the 3010 with 1 liter. Damn, maybe I should go back to trays:(

Scott

Richard Littlewood
7-Apr-2008, 10:44
Each sheet needs 25ml of undiluted ID-11. Thats what I use all the time. That works out at 100ml working solution at 1+3. Thats why I use 1+2 in a Jobo. 10 sheets = 750ml of working solution and at 1+3 its 1000ml. I dont think you can go far wrong as long as each 5x4 sheet gets 25ml of neat ID-11 regardless of the dilution.

Scott Kathe
7-Apr-2008, 13:05
Each sheet needs 25ml of undiluted ID-11. Thats what I use all the time. That works out at 100ml working solution at 1+3. Thats why I use 1+2 in a Jobo. 10 sheets = 750ml of working solution and at 1+3 its 1000ml. I dont think you can go far wrong as long as each 5x4 sheet gets 25ml of neat ID-11 regardless of the dilution.

This is interesting because I thought D76 and ID-11 were supposed to be the same thing or at least the old recipe for D76 is the same as the present day ID-11. In any case according to Kodak the capacity of D76 works out to 62.5ml per 4x5 sheet which is quite different from 25mls.

Scott

Mick Fagan
8-Apr-2008, 04:29
Scott, I develop FP4+ 4x5 with 4 sheets in 300ml of 1+1 D76 in my Jobo CPE2.

This works out at 37.5ml of developer per sheet.

At 20ºC I develop my film for 10'30". I do not use a pre wash, never have.

I expose my film at 100 ASA and in my system I have sparkling negatives which print on grade 3 - 3½ on my DeVere colour enlarger.

You may wish to experiment with and without a pre wash, think you may find an appreciable difference.

I use a 2500 drum and the 2509 reel.

Mick.

Scott Kathe
8-Apr-2008, 04:49
Mick,

Thanks for the idea of not using a prewash so I can get a longer development time. The developer probably diffuses into the emulsion very quickly with the prewash. I noticed much shorter development times in trays when I did a presoak as well.

Scott

venchka
15-Nov-2008, 17:40
Does this combination scan well? I use an Epson 4990 to make 8x10s and maybe an 11x14. I'm trying to stick with one film and one developer and I've thought more about trying HP5+ with D76 1:1 as a next step. I shoot mostly nature/landscape.

Scott

Scott,

I found this and wondered where you were in your quest?

After 60-70 sheets and 3 120 rolls of HP5+ the following processing delivered wonderful (for me anyway) results on an Epson 4990:

EI 250
Jobo 2553 on a reversing Uniroller. I also have a Jobo 3010 and get similar results with either the Uniroller or a non-reversing Beseler. I don't touch the tank while it's on the base.
5 minute pre wash
Xtol 1:3
9 minutes at 68F
Stop, fix wash as normal

The 9 minute time seems very close to perfect. Maybe perfect. I will try one more roll or a couple sheets at 8 minutes and decide which time is best.

ki6mf
19-Nov-2008, 14:06
You may want to to a 1:3 1 part D-76 to 3 parts water and re-test for film speed.

The issue with most full strength developers (1:1) deals compensation for the highlights and the inability to get accurate development for highlights with short development times.

On a sunny day you are probably 2-3 stops overexposed and need to cut your development times to n-2 or n-3 to get the highlights. With a 1:3 D 76 formula your normal time is around 14 minutes, a pain I know! For normal development you end you end up with an 8 minute development time for n-3.

The problem you avoid deals with n-3. You run the risk of cutting into shadow development and not allowing for the highlights to get enough chemicals. Shadows develop at 50% of normal development and highlights take up all of the rest of your development time. Your n-3 time may be something like 4 minutes and 17 seconds (this is a guestimate for illustration purposes) and its just not possible to be that accurate with such short development times and your end up cutting off the highlight development times. The longer development time with diluted developer acts like compensating developer and lets the highlights come out properly. I have good results with D 76 and other developers should work similarly.