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thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 15:30
i just started using hc-110 this weekend . i developed tmax 100 4x5 sheets dilution b for 7 1/2 minutes at 75 degrees and the negatives came out under developed . talked to my buddy at the camera shop and he said he normally adds 4 minutes to developing time with hc-100 . has anybody else found this the case . note i normally use sprint developer with great results , but i decided to try something different .

thanks

tim

domenico Foschi
6-Feb-2008, 15:49
How do you dilute the syrup?

thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 15:58
dilution b . i used 2 ounces of syrup for 64 ounces of water . developing times i downloaded from kodak . 7 1/2 minutes at 75 degress f for tmax 100 old emulsion .

thanks

tim

Gene McCluney
6-Feb-2008, 16:04
You're about right on the dilution..it really should be 2 oz. syrup, with water to make 64 oz. That syrup is so concentrated that you need to rinse out your measuring cup several times with water that goes into making up your 64 oz of final solution.

This is the dilution from the HC-110 syrup just as it comes from the bottle for the US market. European dilutions are slightly different. Also, this is the dilution from "syrup", and if you are first making a "stock" solution from "syrup" and then diluting the "stock" solution yet again-to make working solution, you working solution will be way too weak with 2 oz.

Ralph Barker
6-Feb-2008, 16:09
You might also check your light meter to make sure it's not set at 400. ;)

domenico Foschi
6-Feb-2008, 16:14
I have found this info very valuable for hc110.
http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/
I don't like much dilution B since for N- development, the times are a bit short.
I use HP5+ I can't help you with times.

Ron Marshall
6-Feb-2008, 16:14
With dil. B and 75 degrees that should easily be enough time.

See Massive Dev. Chart:

http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.html

thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 16:20
You might also check your light meter to make sure it's not set at 400. ;)
no light meter was good . i only develop 4 sheets with hc-110 to test it out . i developed 6 sheets withe the sprint developer i like and they came out . great .

thanks

tim

thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 16:23
You're about right on the dilution..it really should be 2 oz. syrup, with water to make 64 oz. That syrup is so concentrated that you need to rinse out your measuring cup several times with water that goes into making up your 64 oz of final solution.

This is the dilution from the HC-110 syrup just as it comes from the bottle for the US market. European dilutions are slightly different. Also, this is the dilution from "syrup", and if you are first making a "stock" solution from "syrup" and then diluting the "stock" solution yet again-to make working solution, you working solution will be way too weak with 2 oz.


yes i made it straight from the syrup . and did the whole rinse deal , i added the syrup to 12 oz of water and filled my bottle from that container till i reached 64 oz and i did some shaking and stirring in between .

thanks

tim

thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 16:26
With dil. B and 75 degrees that should easily be enough time.

See Massive Dev. Chart:

http://www.digitaltruth.com/devchart.html

yes thanks for the link . my buddy at the camera shop said the same thing about developing tri-x , longer developing times than stated . the kodak website says 3 minutes for tri-x at 75 degrees and he found it is closer to 6 minutes for proper negatives . my negatives are usable just thin ( underdeveloped ) .

thanks

tim

rippo
6-Feb-2008, 16:52
i don't use tmax-100, mostly tri-x or delta 100. i do however use hc-110 a lot. i've found the massive development chart times to be right on the money with those films (at least at 68°, or adjusting appropriately for temp, but never as warm as 75°). your times seem like they should be overdeveloping, not underdeveloping.

thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 16:58
i don't use tmax-100, mostly tri-x or delta 100. i do however use hc-110 a lot. i've found the massive development chart times to be right on the money with those films (at least at 68, or adjusting appropriately for temp, but never as warm as 75). your times seem like they should be overdeveloping, not underdeveloping.

yes could be . i normally don't develop so hot but i thought i would try it . i am going to experiment again with it this weekend at a cooler temperature and try different times . i am thinking under developed just because the negatives are thin would they be "thick" with overdevelopment ?

thanks

tim

Gene McCluney
6-Feb-2008, 17:15
This just goes to show that for optimum results you really need to arrive at your own developing times that work with your technique and water supply and shooting technique.

thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 17:23
This just goes to show that for optimum results you really need to arrive at your own developing times that work with your technique and water supply and shooting technique.

yeah i know . just curious to see what others thought . i will have to play with it a little bit to get it right .

thanks

tim

rippo
6-Feb-2008, 17:43
yes could be . i normally don't develop so hot but i thought i would try it . i am going to experiment again with it this weekend at a cooler temperature and try different times . i am thinking under developed just because the negatives are thin would they be "thick" with overdevelopment ?

thanks

tim

yeah i would think your highlights would be pretty opaque at those dev time/temps. you didn't say (if i read properly) how you were developing. tray development? something else? the chart says 5.5-7.5 minutes (a wide variation, not sure why) for tray dev at 68. but adjusting for 75, the proper dev time should have been somewhere between 1-3 minutes. 7 minutes would be pushing the film at least two stops! your film should have been just about black at that point.

and yet you say they came out thin. that's weird. something is definitely not right in the procedure! :)

thetooth
6-Feb-2008, 18:23
yeah i would think your highlights would be pretty opaque at those dev time/temps. you didn't say (if i read properly) how you were developing. tray development? something else? the chart says 5.5-7.5 minutes (a wide variation, not sure why) for tray dev at 68. but adjusting for 75, the proper dev time should have been somewhere between 1-3 minutes. 7 minutes would be pushing the film at least two stops! your film should have been just about black at that point.

and yet you say they came out thin. that's weird. something is definitely not right in the procedure! :)

i use a yankee tank ( please don't laugh i have good luck with this thing :) ) i used the time for tmax 100 professional not professional tmax 100 what the difference is i don't know , for large tank development it 's telling me 7 minutes at 75 degrees . but i did just find this link and this guy is developing for 10 minutes at 75 degrees for iso 100 .

i will mess with it . sometimes these things take a couple try's .

http://www.mironchuk.com/hc-110.html

thanks

tim

Gene McCluney
6-Feb-2008, 20:45
It's real hard to get good agitation in a Yankee tank, and I surmise if you are going to continue to use the Yankee tank, you will need to increase processing time.

thetooth
7-Feb-2008, 13:29
It's real hard to get good agitation in a Yankee tank, and I surmise if you are going to continue to use the Yankee tank, you will need to increase processing time.

i have been using the yankee now for about 4 years with sprint developer with great results . i like it because i can use it with 2 1/4 x 3 1/4 film also . if agitation is the problem with the hc-110 they i won't buy it any more , just go back to old faithful .

thanks

tim

CG
7-Feb-2008, 18:01
Agitation is no more or less an issue with HC-110 than any other general purpose developer. I suspect you had some other issue with the processing with HC-110.

HC-110 is not magic, but it is a solid general purpose developer. It might be worth while working our what did go amiss with HC-110 before you evaluate whether it's for you.

C

thetooth
7-Feb-2008, 19:00
Agitation is no more or less an issue with HC-110 than any other general purpose developer. I suspect you had some other issue with the processing with HC-110.

HC-110 is not magic, but it is a solid general purpose developer. It might be worth while working our what did go amiss with HC-110 before you evaluate whether it's for you.

C

yes i agree about agitation ( that would have a effect on grain structure and grain size development ). just have to find my " magic " : ) combination of time and temperature .

thanks

tim

thetooth
9-Feb-2008, 12:07
just tried it again . this time tmax 100 at 68 degrees for 12 1/2 minutes , 3 minutes longer than kodak recommended . these negatives came out much better . all most perfect .

thanks for all your help

tim