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Bruce Barlow
24-Jan-2008, 05:58
I spoke to Richard yesterday (Jan 23rd) and he says things are progressing nicely.

Now, for the self-serving part of this post.

He has four committed orders. If he has ten by Feb 15, we ten will get a bigger discount because he has economies in his production run.

John Bowen and I need at least six more of you to ante up quickly with deposits. Who knows what would happen if a hundred of you did!

That's why Richard has been mum on the amount of the discount - it will vary with the number of orders.

Richard even darkly hinted that he may need to raise the price after Feb. 15 if the initial order quantity is small. Don't procrastinate if you're interested in a finely-made, American-crafted camera with an innovative design and light weight.

I'm ordering the 4x5 and 5x7 backs, too. It will all replace my existing Sinar and Wista with MUCH less weight and bulk.

So this time, my financial interest has to do with the size of the check I write Richard. With your help, it will be smaller for all of us, and Richard will be well-launched into the camera business (deservedly so).

scott_6029
24-Jan-2008, 08:13
Pictures and discounted pricing? PM me. Thanks.

ljsegil
24-Jan-2008, 08:29
Potentially interested, would like to see any available information.
Thanks,
Larry

Mick Noordewier
24-Jan-2008, 09:20
Likewise.

Ted Harris
24-Jan-2008, 09:30
Larry and Mick,

You can reach Richard at 1-802-365-7807 or info@lg4mat.net. His website is www.lg4mat.net

Gene McCluney
24-Jan-2008, 09:42
Richard does not have any photographs of this camera on his web page, only technical specifications. I am assuming it will look like, and have the same design elements as his ULF cameras? I think if he could put up some photographs of his prototype it would help sell more.

BarryS
24-Jan-2008, 09:48
It would definitely be nice to at least see some good photos of the existing cameras on his site. Some detailed shots of the controls would be nice. I think people considering dropping $3K on a camera might want some additional details and good photos.

davidb
24-Jan-2008, 10:12
So what is the current price without the discount?

John Bowen
24-Jan-2008, 10:29
Richard does not have any photographs of this camera on his web page, only technical specifications. I am assuming it will look like, and have the same design elements as his ULF cameras? I think if he could put up some photographs of his prototype it would help sell more.

Gene,

Bruce Barlow had a small photo of Richard's rail design in the "Old Man's Camera" thread. Yes, it will look like the ULF cameras, only the carbon fiber tubing used for the rail system will be less robust since it won't have to support a monster back (like Sandy King's 20x24).

I own one of Richard's 7x17 cameras and just couldn't imagine a more versatile ULF camera. Oh yeah, and my 7x17 weighs less than my Zone VI 8x10. I'm sure Richard has been out testing his prototype camea with gloves on during the New England winter months. It's nice to be able to use a camera that was designed for use during cold weather. The oversized knobs, etc. really help. Of course those features also make it more pleasant to work with in warm weather.

Mike Castles
24-Jan-2008, 10:50
If you check Richard's website, the price of the camera is $2947 (for the 8x10). After watching the DVD manul that Richard and Bruce have done (I really recommend it) you will have a really good idea of how the cameras look and function (did I mention these cameras have more movements than most of us will ever use).

The discount sounds pretty interesting, but the cost of a back+bellows to change formats is of more interest - guess I need to give Richard a call.

RichardRitter
24-Jan-2008, 12:39
Here are some images of the camera. I was able to borrow a cheap digital camera to make these images.

Image #1 8 x 10 prototype camera.

Image #2 Detail of sliding lens with positive lock to prevent the sliding lock from moving.

Image #3 Detail of custom made carbon fiber tube.

2024 T 3 Aluminum -65 Tensile Strength (ksi) ,10 Tensile Modulus E
Carbon Fiber -200 Tensile Strength (ksi) 20 Tensile Modulus E


Image #3 Camera set up for wide angle lens

Average weight of 4 x5 and 5 x 7 cameras 7 pounds.

This prototype 8 x 10 weights 7 pounds.

Mike Castles
24-Jan-2008, 17:21
Looks like a Very Nice camera Richard, Thank You for the photos.

As I recall from Bruce's other thread on the camera, changing formats (8x10 to say 5x7) is accomplised by changing the back+bellows like the ULF cameras or is there a reducing back that would be available?

Also, to switch from horizontal to vertical - same as the ULF cameras of does the back come of like some of the other LF cameras?

At 7 pounds, it is less than half of my Eastman 7x11 (and I bet this one is more stable) - love my old cameras, but this is really making me think serious abou this.

audioexcels
24-Jan-2008, 23:25
Here are some images of the camera. I was able to borrow a cheap digital camera to make these images.

Image #1 8 x 10 prototype camera.

Image #2 Detail of sliding lens with positive lock to prevent the sliding lock from moving.

Image #3 Detail of custom made carbon fiber tube.

2024 T 3 Aluminum -65 Tensile Strength (ksi) ,10 Tensile Modulus E
Carbon Fiber -200 Tensile Strength (ksi) 20 Tensile Modulus E


Image #3 Camera set up for wide angle lens

Average weight of 4 x5 and 5 x 7 cameras 7 pounds.

This prototype 8 x 10 weights 7 pounds.


VERY SICK!!!

Simply delicious, especially the eye candy 7lb weight combined with the versatility. Being weight conscious, especially Americans (;):):)), this would make a perfect field cam with a 5X7 and 4X5 back. Excellent travel came with 5X7/4X5 back too.

Cheers and I'll be writing to see what the discounted price will come out to be.

Best!

John Bowen
25-Jan-2008, 04:07
Looks like a Very Nice camera Richard, Thank You for the photos.

As I recall from Bruce's other thread on the camera, changing formats (8x10 to say 5x7) is accomplised by changing the back+bellows like the ULF cameras or is there a reducing back that would be available?

Also, to switch from horizontal to vertical - same as the ULF cameras of does the back come of like some of the other LF cameras?

At 7 pounds, it is less than half of my Eastman 7x11 (and I bet this one is more stable) - love my old cameras, but this is really making me think serious abou this.

Mike,

I hope Richard will chime in on this, but from looking at the photos Richard posted, it looks like the back rotates like it does on other LF cameras. I can see the catches on the top of the back. My 7x17 requires rotating the back and bellows to go from horizontal to vertical, but I understand that Sandy King has his built so that only the back had to be rotated (ie Sandy has 24x24 bellows). I also believe Sandy had Richard make a reducing back for him.

Having said this, I'm pretty sure that Richard would build your camera for you which ever way you like. I already have 4x5 & 5x7 reducing backs for my Zone VI 8x10 and I am going to have Richard build mine so that it will accept my current reducing backs :D

Matt Magruder
25-Jan-2008, 05:50
these cameras are incredibly good looking.

Very excited to see you are producing these Richard. I look forward to the day when I can purchase one of your 12x20s. Its inevitable. :)

Bruce Barlow
25-Jan-2008, 05:51
The back rotates to vertical similarly to other LF cameras, unlike (most of) Richard's ULFs. Detach it from the box and rotate it. I don't know what clips he's using to secure it.

I'll replace the back and bellows to change to 5x7 or 4x5, giving the smaller overall package. Lighter, too. Being me, I'll likely choose which format I'm going to use today, change the back, grab the film holder bag, and head out into the world.

If I'm feeling expansive, maybe I'll put a different-sized back in a cooler bag with my lenses and grab a second holder bag.

Richard needs more ULF videos... Maybe I'll hand-deliver them and see the prototype. If it's assembled. As I know Richard, prototypes are usually in pieces so he can tinker with something.

RichardRitter
25-Jan-2008, 06:33
The back is removable, you unlock the lock knob and then slide the clip back then swings it out of the way to change the back. I would post a picture but the system will not let me do it.

The discount will be set February 17th it will be based on the number of deposit on hand at that time.

John Bowen
28-Jan-2008, 09:55
I'll replace the back and bellows to change to 5x7 or 4x5, giving the smaller overall package. Lighter, too. Being me, I'll likely choose which format I'm going to use today, change the back, grab the film holder bag, and head out into the world.

Richard needs more ULF videos... Maybe I'll hand-deliver them and see the prototype.

Bruce,

Interesting thought about having 3 sets of bellows with your camera. My thought was to only have 1 set of bellows and multiple reducing backs. Do you really think that the weight of the bellows will be that much less than a reducing back? My other thought was that using a 5x7 back with an 8x10 bellows would help reduce internal flare from the bellows.

Who says great minds think alike???

Did you get over to Richard's? Did he have the prototype put together?

Bruce Barlow
28-Jan-2008, 10:40
Bruce,

Interesting thought about having 3 sets of bellows with your camera. My thought was to only have 1 set of bellows and multiple reducing backs. Do you really think that the weight of the bellows will be that much less than a reducing back? My other thought was that using a 5x7 back with an 8x10 bellows would help reduce internal flare from the bellows.

Who says great minds think alike???

Did you get over to Richard's? Did he have the prototype put together?

Remember, I would rarely leave the house with more than one format...except when traveling with you! So different bellows is what I want, rather than a reducing back. I want the 4x5 to be SMALL. And I'll bet I can get both "other" backs in one cooler bag. I've never had a problem with flare, myself. At least that I've noticed.

Great minds sometimes think alike. But I never even thought of flare.

Wednesday -to deliver some copies of the ULF video and go to the Dam Diner for breakfast. I'll take my pocket digicam.

John Bowen
31-Jan-2008, 15:29
Placed my order today. Now if enough of the rest of you order a camera, the price of mine will go down. How's that for Economic Stimulus :-)

Just remember, the discount is set on February 17th, so get those orders and deposits to Richard ASAP....

Bruce Barlow
1-Feb-2008, 04:54
Well, the prototype was in pieces, and many of them weren't anodized and pretty, so it was a good thing I forgot my digicam Wednesday. Wouldn't have been very photogenic anyway, compared to the finished product.

I did hoist the 8x10 under construction. Ohhh, baby! There was virtually nothing to it!

My pants pocket was lighter one deposit check by the time I left. Richard bought breakfast at the Dam Diner (near the Townshend dam...get it?).

Why would I want to wait six months for a brand C to ship from the SIlk Road? Better camera, American-made, innovative design, supremely flexible, convertible in the field, deserving craftsman, competitive price, easy service from the best on the planet.

And Richard tells me he found a box of old Zone VI ground glass frames (leave it to Richard to have a box of such tucked away where he didn't remember it!). With minor mods, he can use them, saving a lot of time and labor on one of the harder pieces to make (it's that pesky T-dimension that keeps the image in focus on both the film and GG). Smells like MOMENTUM!

Get off the fence! Place a deposit by the 17th and it's cheaper for all! Don't act like members of that other forum, who only moan and do nothing! You savings could buy a lot of film! Or holders! Or even a lens, maybe!

You could even spend your savings on a Fine Focus Workshop. Hmm, a workshop only for Ritter camera owners... That would be a hoot!

eddie
1-Feb-2008, 05:35
Why would I want to wait six months for a brand C to ship from the SIlk Road? Better camera, American-made, innovative design, supremely flexible, convertible in the field, deserving craftsman, competitive price, easy service from the best on the planet.





i am interested. i would like to get one. BUT i find it a bit trouble some that i get almost no responses from Mr Ritter. i have sent many e mails inquiring about costs, build info, etc. i finally had to call on the phone. after that i did receive an e mail answering most of my questions!

i understand he may be understaffed. if that is the case an employee is in order. it would be a tremendous benefit to his business to have awesome photos of these works of art as well as some customer service! i understand all the "buy in america" but at what price?

my experience from the silk road as comparison went like this. i emailed the gent regarding the 8x10 camera when i left work. i arrived at home 40min later with an e mail awaiting with all my questions answered! ahhh! customer service.

again, i am interested in a camera from mr ritter it is not an easy decision.

eddie

Mike Castles
1-Feb-2008, 06:32
Guess it is just the luck of the draw, but when I inquired about a Ritter camera, Richard responded within a day. Not a comment on your experience eddie, but did want to share a different result.

RichardRitter
1-Feb-2008, 06:59
Eddie
I have no e mails from you and the phone message one was so gabble I could not get the phone number.

As to the price is $2947 less discount to be set on the 17th of Feb.

Employee, very expense, very time consuming to train and watch over. It would be a loss of income and freedom to me.

BarryS
1-Feb-2008, 07:43
Richard--I don't get the whole the "mystery discount" process. Why can't you post the final prices based on the number of orders. Something like 1-5: $2947, 6-10: $????, 11-15: $????? That would give people the information to make an informed decision and an incentive to sign up. One person's idea of a discount may be 5% and another person's might be 25%. Don't you already have some numbers in your head? If so, why not share them. Thanks.

eddie
1-Feb-2008, 07:44
Eddie
I have no e mails from you and the phone message one was so gabble I could not get the phone number.

As to the price is $2947 less discount to be set on the 17th of Feb.

Employee, very expense, very time consuming to train and watch over. It would be a loss of income and freedom to me.


well thanks for the response.

i am sorry the emails did not reach you. i copied and pasted it directly from your web site.

i am sorry that the answering machine records "gabble".

faulty e mail and answering machine....?!?!!?

enjoy your freedom.

thanks, you have helped me finalize my decision.

good luck with your sales.

eddie

John Bowen
1-Feb-2008, 07:50
Where else can you find an 8x10 camera with 32 inches of bellows draw that weight 7.5 lbs? I know there are some light weight 8x10 cameras out there, but I'm not aware of one with 32+ inches of bellows.

Ted Harris
1-Feb-2008, 08:13
eddie,

You should think twice. Ricahrd's low in rural Vermont is what helps keep his prices where they are. One of the problems of rural America is that we are not always as "connected" as we might like to be. I have one thin telephone/utility pole that connects me to the outside world, if it gets knocked over I am in big trouble .... however the tradeoffs make it worth taking the chance. Further, his genius and craftsmanship flourish in this environment .... not sure that would be the case elsewhere. Take a hard look at what he is offering v. what else is out there, his camera may not be for you but don't dismiss it out-of-hand just because you had a problem with an electronic communication.

keeds
1-Feb-2008, 08:20
The 8x10 really does sound sweet. It's a 7x17 that I'm hankering for though. Just need to find the right time to "discuss" it with the wife...

RichardRitter
1-Feb-2008, 09:30
The 8x10 really does sound sweet. It's a 7x17 that I'm hankering for though. Just need to find the right time to "discuss" it with the wife...

When it arrives on your birthday.

John Bowen
1-Feb-2008, 12:47
Now that will be a Birthday to remember

keeds
1-Feb-2008, 15:41
It certainly would, although it may well be my last...

Bruce Barlow
2-Feb-2008, 04:34
i am interested. i would like to get one. BUT i find it a bit trouble some that i get almost no responses from Mr Ritter. i have sent many e mails inquiring about costs, build info, etc. i finally had to call on the phone. after that i did receive an e mail answering most of my questions!

i understand he may be understaffed. if that is the case an employee is in order. it would be a tremendous benefit to his business to have awesome photos of these works of art as well as some customer service! i understand all the "buy in america" but at what price?

again, i am interested in a camera from mr ritter it is not an easy decision.

eddie


I'd love to have an assistant, too. In fact I've emailed Maria Sharapova and Megan Foster a number of times about coming to New Hampshire and working for nearly no money, but having a lot of breaks, and for some reason I have received no responses. Can't understand it.

I don't know where to start about your rant re: Richard. Give him a break. A half hour after I left on Wednesday he lost electricity for four hours. He's on the last pole on the line, and his internet speeds rarely exceed 25kbps. But if you saw where he lives, you'd want to move in.

Even he tells people that the phone is the best bet, and your post says that he did respond, just not fast enough for you...

But if he's being that unresponsive, maybe Megan Foster responded to him?? Richard, do you have somebody stashed up there in the woods? Gonna share?

Eddie, glad you've made your decision, and I assume it's not Richard. Some might feel relieved.

Blacky Dalton
2-Feb-2008, 08:33
Do I hear echoes of the Ron Wisner Business plan?

B. Dalton

John Ossi
2-Feb-2008, 09:13
Looking at the photos of the 810 and ULF models, I can't make out how the cameras are focussed. Are the standards just slid forward and back, or am I missing something?

John Bowen
2-Feb-2008, 09:39
Blacky,

How dare you compare Richard Ritter with Ron Wisner!!!!

Richard is an active participant on this forum and openly shares his knowledge and wisdom. As Bruce pointed out above, and as I have pointed out on previous threads, Richard is at the "end of the line" when it comes to phone service and electricity. He lives in God's Country and Mother Nature often decides the fate of Richard's phone and/or electricity. Richard is also a one man show. If he decides to take a week off and go photograph, teach a workshop or visit family he may not be able to return a call or e-mail as soon as you might like. That is why if you are serious about contacting Richard your best bet is to pick up the phone and call him.

If someone leaves Richard a garbled phone message, it isn't Richard's fault. If he can't understand the caller's phone number that too isn't Richard's fault.

A simple search of this forum will turn up numerous posters shouting Richard's praises for the quality of his workmanship and fairness of his prices.

I don't ever remember seeing Blacky Dalton or eddie listed on Tom Peter's list of Outstanding Service Providers!

We, as a community, should be doing our collective best to support Richard. We are lucky to have him and I feel fortunate to be able to call him a friend.

Blacky, as my sixth grade teacher used to say, "next time be sure your brain is in gear before putting your mouth in motion"

Enough Said

John Bowen
2-Feb-2008, 09:42
Looking at the photos of the 810 and ULF models, I can't make out how the cameras are focussed. Are the standards just slid forward and back, or am I missing something?

John,

The cameras are "rough focused" by sliding the rails. The fine focus is accomplished via a "worm drive" ie a screw located at the back of the camera. I own one of Richard's 7x17 cameras.

Most ULF cameras are focused this way because most folk's arms aren't long enough.

David Karp
2-Feb-2008, 10:06
Do I hear echoes of the Ron Wisner Business plan?

B. Dalton

Never have a I read or heard anything but good things about Richard Ritter. Of all the cameras he has repaired (apparently including lots of Wisner cameras that Wisner himself would not repair), I have never seen a complaint on this forum.

Certainly, if I needed a repair to a camera or a custom part built for my camera, Richard would be one of, if not the only, sources I would consider.

alec4444
2-Feb-2008, 13:04
The 8x10 really does sound sweet. It's a 7x17 that I'm hankering for though. Just need to find the right time to "discuss" it with the wife...

Ditto. Or 8x20. Eddie, I know where you're coming from - I've had an ass load of frustrating experiences with large format businesses. There's two people that I feel I can reliably count on, and Richard is one of them. Remember how nice that bail back was on the 11x14? That was his. He also sealed the interior pieces of wood that made up the extension. You should do as you please, of course, particularly when it comes to large purchases. Just thought I'd add my 2 cents.

--A

PS: Jim @ Midwest is the second person, in case anyone wondered. ;)

Ralph Barker
2-Feb-2008, 13:13
The 8x10 really does sound sweet. It's a 7x17 that I'm hankering for though. Just need to find the right time to "discuss" it with the wife...

My understanding is that the best time for such discussions is right after you hand them the keys to their new Mercedes. ;)

John Ossi
2-Feb-2008, 14:31
John,

The cameras are "rough focused" by sliding the rails. The fine focus is accomplished via a "worm drive" ie a screw located at the back of the camera.

John,
Thanks for the information. One more question: when the fine focussing screw is turned, does the front or the rear move?

John Bowen
2-Feb-2008, 16:00
John

Turning the screw moves the BACK.

Bruce Barlow
2-Feb-2008, 17:13
Do I hear echoes of the Ron Wisner Business plan?

B. Dalton

I second Mr. Bowen's response.

Blacky, Richard lived thru the Wisner disaster at Zone VI. I spent three months of my life researching damages in support of Zone VI's lawsuit against Mr. Wisner when I wasn't answering phone calls from irate customers - at the rate of 25 a day - about why they hadn't received their cameras when he failed to deliver. It wasn't my favorite time of life. Believe me, you have absolutely no clue as to what that was like, day in and day out. I do, because I did it. So did Richard. Richard is extremely sensitive to that time, which is why he's so cautious about announcing dates and pricing. He doesn't want to do anything that would misguide people, and won't promise what he can't deliver.

I get so tired of armchair photographers and armchair small businesspeople who think they know how to do it better when they've never tried to do it at all.

Ah, of note: I suggested to Richard that he might publish a set of prospective discount amounts based on quantities of early orders, since someone suggested that he do that so people could plan (a very legitimate suggestion, which is why I brought it up to Richard). While he's mulling it, he did make a good point: "What if I said that there would be a 15% discount for 15 orders, people who ordered planned on that, and then there were only 7 orders?"

BarryS
2-Feb-2008, 21:36
I made the suggestion on disclosing the discounts and I think if you give the number of orders up front along with the *potential* discounts, and periodically update the current number of orders--it will generate more interest. So you could lay out the discounts and say--as of today we have 6 orders. So if I order a camera, I can see that I'll be receiving at least an X% discount. It might be a better discount if more folks order, but of course there aren't any guarantees. I might look at the numbers and think--gee if I can get two more buddies to buy in, we can get another 5% off. Then you post periodic updates as more orders come in and maybe people who've been on the fence see a better discount and go ahead and order.

John Bowen
3-Feb-2008, 06:20
Barry,

I agree with your suggestions. I can also relate to Richard's dilemna. It is my understanding that everything that isn't wood on these cameras is outsourced. Richard probably has 5+ suppliers involved and most of this stuff is custom made for this camera. I believe the biggest "cost" for Richard is the camera bellows. These come from overseas so you have foreign exchange involved, not to mention overseas shipping. I also know that Richard is doing at least a couple "custom" modifications for folks that may involve the bellows. Bruce has stated he is ordering his camera with 4x5, 5x7 & 8x10 bellows. I am ordering mine with 1 set of 8x10 bellows, although I have requested a slightly different bellows material. Richard has told me he will TRY and accomidate my request, but it is all subject to the camera bellows manufacturer having the material available.

Dealing with a number of suppliers who may all offer Richard various discounts depending on the size of the order isn't any fun. It is certainly much easier for Richard and his suppliers if he contacts them on 2/15 and requests pricing for X cameras. Once he has the info from his suppliers, he can calculate the discount.

I know this doesn't make it any easier for those of you sitting on the fence. I think those of us who have already ordered wanted this camera, thought the initial price was fair and crossed our fingers that we MIGHT receive a discount. I know if I waited until 2/20 to order my camera my discount would be a very determinable ZERO.

Barry, I know this doesn't make your decision any easier, but I am just trying to explain MY UNDERSTANDING on the process and MY decision to place my order now.

Also, reread the original post where Bruce stated that if the initial run of cameras is small, Richard may have to RAISE his prices. That may help you get off the fence.

PS, I'm in Richmond so maybe we can get together for some image making some day.

BarryS
3-Feb-2008, 09:01
John-- Thanks for your perspective. I have no doubt that everyone buying one of Richard's new 8x10's will consider themselves lucky regardless of the final price they pay. and any discount will be the icing on the cake. It looks like a beautiful, innovative camera, made by a master craftsman with hard-earned reputation for integrity and quality. The base on Richard's cameras reminds me of the rod and rail systems used on film and video cameras--and those systems have proven themselves for precision, stability, and durability.

Unfortunately, I've caught a bad case of the large format virus and have already spent too much putting together my 4x5 system. It seems ridiculous to covet a nice 8x10 field camera and yet... :) I'd love to get together sometime and shoot and soak up some of your LF wisdom.

Bruce Barlow
3-Feb-2008, 11:57
It seems ridiculous to covet a nice 8x10 field camera and yet... :)

Remember, interchangeable backs. And 5x7 contact prints are soooo delicious.

You should get together with John Bowen. One of the finest human beings I've ever had the privilege to meet.

You guys said it all re: Richard and pricing. I'm sure Richard will read what you wrote and think about it.

RichardRitter
3-Feb-2008, 12:08
Current discount is 7.152% and going up.

John Bowen
3-Feb-2008, 12:42
Current discount is 7.152% and going up.

This is what happens when you let an craftsman rather than a marketing guru set the discount :D Thanks Richard!

Colin Graham
3-Feb-2008, 13:11
No kidding- accurate to 3 decimal places!

Bruce Barlow
4-Feb-2008, 06:24
Remember, Richard's dial-up internet connection rarely works as fast as 25kbps, so three decimal places adds a lot of time to the upload. Wonder if he had stopped laughing by the time it was posted?

RichardRitter
4-Feb-2008, 06:47
Remember, Richard's dial-up internet connection rarely works as fast as 25kbps, so three decimal places adds a lot of time to the upload. Wonder if he had stopped laughing by the time it was posted?

After 10 years of complaining to the phone company they finely replace the line that was put in the early 50s. The day they did that my connection speed double. They kept telling me there was no problem with the line, It still not all that great.

When I worked in the machine shop I sometimes worked to 6 decimal places and by the way I had a small roll in todays high speed internet and phone system. I built parts for the first fiber optic phone system that when in. And here I live where I shear they are still using bailing wire and tin cans for the phone system.

keeds
5-Feb-2008, 03:46
Just curious, what is the shortest lens that could be practically used for 4x5 without the rails showing? I suppose you could drop the rails with rear tilt and use front rise?

Bruce Barlow
8-Feb-2008, 04:52
Just another blatant plug.

I want a bigger discount! Let's go, people! Time to get off the fence and fall into the snow. I don't think Richard needs BIG deposits, but he does need to count deposits. The more the merrier!

Buy yourself a Valentine present. You deserve it.

davidb
8-Feb-2008, 13:04
Two questions:

where is the bellows coming from?

what is the current discount?

davidb
9-Feb-2008, 11:29
? ?

John Bowen
9-Feb-2008, 15:52
David,

CALL Richard

davidb
9-Feb-2008, 16:32
when I have time to talk I will.

can't this info just be posted?

RichardRitter
10-Feb-2008, 07:14
when I have time to talk I will.

can't this info just be posted?

When I have the time I will re-figure it out and I will post it. As of Feb 9th it was 7.??%.
ever time I have to figure out the discount the time spent is put toward the cost of the camera and the discount suffers. The camera was not going to be marketed until the fall of this year and the project cost was $3100. Through an angle and friends that put up the up front tooling cost I was able to get it to the market this spring and at a lower cost. I don't have to give a discount. Read post #1 & 45.

Bellows comes from the same supplier Phillips, Canham uses.

audioexcels
10-Feb-2008, 10:33
When I have the time I will re-figure it out and I will post it. As of Feb 9th it was 7.??%.
ever time I have to figure out the discount the time spent is put toward the cost of the camera and the discount suffers. The camera was not going to be marketed until the fall of this year and the project cost was $3100. Through an angle and friends that put up the up front tooling cost I was able to get it to the market this spring and at a lower cost. I don't have to give a discount. Read post #1 & 45.

Bellows comes from the same supplier Phillips, Canham uses.

How about a run of 5X8 Cameras w/Holders for them? Not sure if any others agree, but just a thought for a group buy in future. I guess I just think 8X10 is too big (and looking at Richard's website sure helps with those mega ULF cams making an 8X10 look like a dwarf!).

John Bowen
10-Feb-2008, 11:34
If you want a 5x8 camera give Richard a CALL. He lists a 5x8 back as one of the options on this camera. Holders??? You would definitely have to talk to Richard about that. FYI Richard also lists 4x5, 5x7, 7x11 and 4x10 in addition to 5x8 as optional backs.

RichardRitter
10-Feb-2008, 12:55
No on the holders there are two good holder makers here in the US. Get one of them to make the holders, I'll make the camera.

audioexcels
10-Feb-2008, 23:09
No on the holders there are two good holder makers here in the US. Get one of them to make the holders, I'll make the camera.

Hehehehe;):):)

Mike Castles
13-Feb-2008, 06:25
Gosh, only 4 days left to get that discount. :eek:

keeds
13-Feb-2008, 07:07
So who is in for one of these beauties? I've been drawn in, although I'm just waiting to hear from Richard about how much deposit and the best way to get it to him. Last communication with him said he had just had 1 foot of new snow to deal with...

RichardRitter
13-Feb-2008, 09:15
Had the snow now its raining and everything is covered with ice. Pretty to look at but the light is like lead and not great to take photographs in. It is to turn back to snow this afternoon. Bye Bye power and phone for a day or two.

John Bowen
13-Feb-2008, 15:22
Hey Richard hope you keep the power and phone on. My "Younglings" (that's an inside joke) were home from school on Monday & Tuesday. The reason, no power at their school. No rain, no snow, no ice, just a really good wind storm that knocked down a bunch of power poles in central VA.

PS I'm in for one of these 8x10 beauties!

Bruce Barlow
13-Feb-2008, 15:45
Evan got a day off today. 8" of heavy, wet snow fell last night, and it's been raining since 8 a.m. It's now 5:40 and it's still pouring. Can't get up the hill, I figger, so we hunkered in the bunker.

Richard was working hard today on MY 8x10, we hope.

John Bowen
13-Feb-2008, 16:25
Richard told me he was working on MY 8x10

RichardRitter
14-Feb-2008, 06:06
I was working on Clyde's 11 x 14 yesterday.
Need to go unload some holders but before I can do that they need to see the light of day.

Daniel_Buck
4-Apr-2008, 16:56
I'm bringing this thread back up form a few months ago, I'm curious how the cameras turned out! Anyone in the Los Angeles area have one? I would love to see one, I'm interested in checking out this camera as a possible light weight 8x10 for longer hikes! (with the addition of more movement than my current 8x10!) Anyone around Los Angeles have a Ritter 8x10, that wouldn't mind meeting up with me sometime to show me the camera? Wouldn't have to be a photo trip, just a quick 10-15 minute meet up for me to check the camera out 'hands on' to see for myself how it works.

keeds
5-Apr-2008, 09:50
My last comms with Richard was that there was a hold up with the carbon fibre tubing for these cameras and he had been held up waiting for delivery. Tubing has since arrived and he was very busy building cameras. I doubt anyone has got theirs yet.

Daniel_Buck
5-Apr-2008, 10:11
Thanks Keeds, I'm in email contact with Richard now.

HBDesert
5-Apr-2008, 10:12
Although I don't have a Ritter 8x10, I did just pick up a Ritter 12x20. All I can say is WOW!

This thing has more movements than P.T Barnum contortionist. I got it and the next day drove up to Yosemite for a long weekend. There were shots that I took from the valley floor that no other camera of this size could have taken.
My only dilemma now is instead of taking my 4x5 Ebony on my next trip to Hawaii I want to bring the Ritter!

No one should be disappointed with a product from Richard Ritter.

Take Care,

Doug

audioexcels
5-Apr-2008, 14:56
Although I don't have a Ritter 8x10, I did just pick up a Ritter 12x20. All I can say is WOW!

This thing has more movements than P.T Barnum contortionist. I got it and the next day drove up to Yosemite for a long weekend. There were shots that I took from the valley floor that no other camera of this size could have taken.
My only dilemma now is instead of taking my 4x5 Ebony on my next trip to Hawaii I want to bring the Ritter!

No one should be disappointed with a product from Richard Ritter.

Take Care,

Doug

Holy...cow:). Did you find the Ritter used or was it custom built for you? Very curious is if you can post any photos of the prints done from your trip and also how manageable a size that large is especially that you are considering it for hawaii. Heck, you should definitely take some color roll film for some shots of all the lush territory of Hawaii. What island/s will you be going to? If any, a must go to is the big one:).

HBDesert
5-Apr-2008, 21:31
The 12x20 is new. It was the last one from his last production run.

I don't have any negs yet processesd as I just got it last week.

I'm working a week in Honolulu, then to Volcano for a few days and then Princeville for a few more.

I don't think the Ritter is going to go on this trip. The 4x5 will have to do.

Take Care,

Doug

Daniel_Buck
18-Jun-2008, 14:21
has anyone else's arrived? Mine arrived today :-D can't wait to play with it this weekend!

John Bowen
18-Jun-2008, 19:41
I picked mine up at the Ted Harris Memorial Weekend. Sweet camera. You are gonna love it Daniel. It may take a few moments of what Bruce Barlow calls "camera cuddle" to get the hang of it, but that is true with any new camera. I can't believe how light it is.

Have fun!

keeds
19-Jun-2008, 00:46
Wow, congrats Daniel. I still only have half a RR 7x17. Just waiting the Customs to release the other half! I'm on the list for a 8x10 also which should be sometime later in the year. I'm looking forward to see how light it is myself...

toyosnapper
19-Jun-2008, 03:13
On my Toyo 45All I can use a 55mm Rodenstock on 5x4 without getting the rails in the pic. It would not go any shorter tho. Dennis.

Bruce Barlow
19-Jun-2008, 03:30
The Ted Harris Memorial Weekend was a hoot - at one point we had three of Richard's 8x10s in a row. Being photographers, we were too incompetent to make a picture of them lined up... Those of us using them had a good time, and I have new negatives to print. Good ol' Alice keeps delivering the goods.

Richard tells me that he's working on my 5x7 back-with-bellows, which will then accept a 4x5 reducing back. Sounds good to me: one less bellows to carry, more compact to carry. Should be fun.

Mike Castles
19-Jun-2008, 05:09
The Ted Harris Memorial Weekend was a hoot - at one point we had three of Richard's 8x10s in a row. Being photographers, we were too incompetent to make a picture of them lined up... Those of us using them had a good time, and I have new negatives to print. Good ol' Alice keeps delivering the goods.



LOL That's too funny Bruce, maybe we will have to have special weekend for everyone with a Richard Ritter camera once they have all gone out (even if we can't all get together at the same place).

Last word from Richard was he was working on the backs, and bellows were in. Should not be long now - and to honest, don't mind waiting - besides, what do you call a custom, custom camera? :D

Bruce Barlow
19-Jun-2008, 06:35
LOL That's too funny Bruce, maybe we will have to have special weekend for everyone with a Richard Ritter camera once they have all gone out (even if we can't all get together at the same place).

Last word from Richard was he was working on the backs, and bellows were in. Should not be long now - and to honest, don't mind waiting - besides, what do you call a custom, custom camera? :D

That could be a lot of fun. Maybe sometime spring-ish next year? I'll keep it in mind, and thanks for the idea.

John Bowen
19-Jun-2008, 08:24
The Ted Harris Memorial Weekend was a hoot - at one point we had three of Richard's 8x10s in a row. Being photographers, we were too incompetent to make a picture of them lined up...

I don't think we were too incompetent, I believe it was the lunatik :eek: screaming at us to get out of his otherwise empty parking lot that preclueded the photograph...

ic-racer
23-Sep-2008, 13:10
I'm bumping this thread to see if those of you who now have these 8x10s from Richard can give some honest opinions.

How much does it weigh in use with a typical lens? (anyone weigh theirs?)
Is is worth the expense? (PM me if needed ;))
Any down-side to this camera?
Things you would want changed or would have liked to special ordered?

venchka
23-Sep-2008, 15:37
...

Things you would want changed or would have liked to special ordered?

The biggest change I would like to see happen is.......................

SWMBO's Vise-Grip clamp on the purse strings. Then I could buy one of Mr. Ritter's 8x10 cameras. ;) :D :cool:

Mike Castles
23-Sep-2008, 18:10
I'm bumping this thread to see if those of you who now have these 8x10s from Richard can give some honest opinions.

How much does it weigh in use with a typical lens? (anyone weigh theirs?)
Is is worth the expense? (PM me if needed ;))
Any down-side to this camera?
Things you would want changed or would have liked to special ordered?

Mine just arrived this past weekend, but I do have some first impressions.

Weight - no scales, but I was shocked how light the box was when I picked it up at the Post Office. Out of the box it is such a joy to handle.

Was is worth the expense? Guess that falls under the heading of how much can you afford to spend. Have used a few older cameras (that I do love), but this one is all I expected it to be. Can say it was less than a new Canham, which would have been a 2nd choice - but I feel I got what I wanted (and it is not a standard 8x10 Ritter).

Down-side: Not yet, but to fair, have not had it long enough.

Special Order - Yes, Richard made mine with 8x10 and 7x11 backs, so I feel like it is a special order. Everything from the bale-back, to the light weight to the near perfect fit and finish is what I hoped for.

Need to get a couple of lens boards for the smaller Fuji lens (Copal No. 1 shutter) from Richard - I could cut my own, but he does such a great job, I like the way the camera looks with his lens boards.

Current lens mounted for the camera is an Caltar 375mm in an Ilex 5. Now this is a big lens as most of you know, and I am pleased with how the front standard handles this beast. The photo I posted here (http://mikecastles.wordpress.com/2008/09/20/new-ritter-7x118x10-camera/dsc00019/) is a view of the GG with the 375mm.

John Bowen
23-Sep-2008, 18:15
I'm bumping this thread to see if those of you who now have these 8x10s from Richard can give some honest opinions.

How much does it weigh in use with a typical lens? (anyone weigh theirs?)
Is is worth the expense? (PM me if needed ;))
Any down-side to this camera?
Things you would want changed or would have liked to special ordered?

I first read this post over 3 hours ago, so I have given it a lot of thought.

The camera weighs < 6.5 lbs. Add the weight of your "typical" lens and there you go. I'm not trying to be funny here, but I have no idea what the "typical" 8x10 lens weighs. YMMV.

Is it worth the expense? If this means would I replace it if it were to be destroyed? The answer is a resounding YES.

Any down-side? This is where the thought comes in. Somebody might have an issue, but I haven't experienced any. I did have someone e-mail me to say he needed a shorter screw for his Ries because the standard length screw would contact the worm drive. Ries supplied the shorter screw for $25.

I already owned a Ritter 7x17 when I placed my order, so I was pretty familiar with the camera upon its arrival. I had Richard modify mine to accept Zone VI 8x10 lens boards, but he can make adapters for any lensboard you might already own. If you are going to order a camera from Richard, I would STRONGLY recommend you give Richard a call to discuss it. I'm left handed and Richard suggested some modifications to make my camera easier for a lefty to use. Since the rest of my cameras are "righty" I opted to not make those suggested changes. I already owned 4x5 and 5x7 reducing backs for my Zone VI 8x10. I told Richard when I ordered my camera, that I wanted the back to be able to accept those reducing backs. The reducing backs fit my Ritter 8x10 like a charm.

Count me as a happy customer :D

Daniel_Buck
23-Sep-2008, 18:20
Somebody might have an issue, but I haven't experienced any. I did have someone e-mail me to say he needed a shorter screw for his Ries because the standard length screw would contact the worm drive. Ries supplied the shorter screw for $25.

that was me, yes the shorter Ries screw works. With the original (longer) tripod screw, I was only able to get a few threads in before it hits the focusing worm/screw on the camera. I'm not quite sure the reason for the camera not having either the hole offset, or the focusing worm offset. But with the shorter tripod screw I've had no problems putting the camera on my tripod. Fortunately, Ries heads have interchangeable screws, and they were willing to make me a custom screw. I guess their standard screw is a bit longer than other tripod screws?

Bruce Barlow
23-Sep-2008, 18:34
I had to get a 3/8"screw from Hamshaw's (the local hardware store) to modify a Bogen hexagonal mounting plate...thirty five cents, if I recall. Then I had to file it shorter, which took 5 minutes. It was the shortest one they had, and was still a tad long.

Alice is still producing the goods. Just signed up for an 8x10 portrait project, and have a week in Maine coming up real soon...

venchka
24-Sep-2008, 05:47
Bumping this up and wanted to mention I will have my Ritter 8x10 (http://mikecastles.wordpress.com/2008/09/20/new-ritter-7x118x10-camera/) (with 7x11 back) at this gathering, so if you have been thinking about a new Ritter or just wanted to see one.

If all goes according to plan, I will at least be able to look at a R.R. 8x10 camera. :cool:

Cheers!

ic-racer
24-Sep-2008, 08:39
I first read this post over 3 hours ago, so I have given it a lot of thought.

The camera weighs < 6.5 lbs. Add the weight of your "typical" lens and there you go.

Actually I was interested in YOUR typical lens/camera weight. Do you go out hiking with a monster lens, or have you chosen a lightweight lens to go with this lightweight camera? Or do you cary more than one lens?

I know my current 8x10 setup and if I get any heavier I won't be able to go where I want to go. I have it as light as I can get so far. I even selected my tripod plate for its light weight. I usually take 2 holders. I went out with 4 the other day and it was killing me. Maybe I'm a weakling, but I was just wondering how much weight others are lugging around. Trails around me go up and down some reasonably steep inclines.

Nathan Potter
24-Sep-2008, 15:01
Well years ago when I was packing an 8X10 and three lenses, etc., etc., etc. I used a packframe which came in at just under 50 lbs. Most I could manage was about 6 miles in a day in the White Mts. of New Hampshire. But I was in good shape. Now I can only manage my 4X5 Technikardan with 4 lenses, 22 lbs., and perhaps 2 miles at a stint.

Nate Potter, Austin TX.

John Bowen
24-Sep-2008, 16:06
Actually I was interested in YOUR typical lens/camera weight. Do you go out hiking with a monster lens, or have you chosen a lightweight lens to go with this lightweight camera? Or do you cary more than one lens?

I know my current 8x10 setup and if I get any heavier I won't be able to go where I want to go. I have it as light as I can get so far. I even selected my tripod plate for its light weight. I usually take 2 holders. I went out with 4 the other day and it was killing me. Maybe I'm a weakling, but I was just wondering how much weight others are lugging around. Trails around me go up and down some reasonably steep inclines.

All I know is it is 8 lbs LESS then my Zone VI 8x10! Combined with the Ries J tripod and head the Ritter 8x10 is about 20 lbs less then my Zone VI with Zone VI STANDARD tripod. My lenses range form a 240 Fujinon in a copal 1 (weighs about the same as a blackberry) to a 360 Symmar S in a Copal 3 (weighs about the same as a boat anchor). My most used lens is a Nikkor 450M in a Copal 3. I also have a 450 Fujinon in a Copal 1 (just in case I ever get the urge to hike a long distance with my 8x10 :eek: ). I don't hike with my camera. My hiking consists of carrying my golf bag for 5 miles over a course of 4 hours. ;) If it is more than 100 yards from the Sequoia, I likely grab the 35mm instead of the 8x10. However, based on input from various ULF folks, I've just picked up a jogging stroller. I plan on shooting some areas of the James River here in Richmond that are approx 1/2 mile from the parking areas. Looking forward to the "expanded range".

Sorry if I can't help you with your question. But what is important to YOU is not how much MY camera and MY lens weighs, but how much YOUR camera and YOUR lens weighs. Unless of course you would like to volunteer to be my sherpa :D

Daniel_Buck
24-Sep-2008, 17:05
My hiking 8x10 lenses consist of a 240 g-claron and 450 fujinon-c, both nice and light weight. Each of those lenses will both fit in the front standard while the camera is closed, that too is a nice feature! Doesn't save weight, but it does save space when packing a backpack, and (if you shoot with only a few lenses) means less setup and tear-down time if you don't need to switch to a different focal length.

I'm not quite sure how a big heavy lens would do on the Ritter, one of the 4+ pounders. It seems to be strong, but a 4 pound lens would weight more than 1/2 of the camera itself! I think since the camera itself is lacking in mass (1/2 or more than alot of other cameras!) it's a bit more prone to vibrations when you interact with the camera, and when the wind hits. I know this is a common problem with larger cameras, but I do notice more vibration than when I'm using my Tachihara 8x10. But the Tachi has about twice as much mass, so I guess that mass dampens vibration? So far though, it hasn't presented any problems. I just make sure the camera has settled before I click the shutter.

Mike Castles
5-Jan-2009, 11:28
Have posted my impression (http://mikecastles.wordpress.com/2009/01/04/ritter-7x118x10-re-visited/)of the Ritter 8x10, after using it for just over 3 months.

Would be interesting to hear impression from others that have had the camera for a while.

venchka
5-Jan-2009, 11:31
Sorry, Mike, I won't read it. Nope. Not after picking the camera up with two fingers. No indeed. You can't make me read your impressions.

Grinning. OK, I'll read what you have to say. That can't hurt, can it?

venchka
5-Jan-2009, 11:34
Very nice. Thanks, Mike.

RichardRitter
5-Jan-2009, 11:57
Thanks Mike I do have a second 7 x 11 back and box here.

Rakesh Malik
5-Jan-2009, 13:41
Thanks Mike I do have a second 7 x 11 back and box here.

So... how much does the 4x5 version weigh? :)

And is the asymmetric movement thing a rumor, or is that really an option? :)

If you can do asymmetric, or even better floating axes, with less weight AND more bellows extension than an Ebony... well, that will help decide where my tax refund will if I get one :)

Mike Castles
5-Jan-2009, 18:38
Sorry, Mike, I won't read it. Nope. Not after picking the camera up with two fingers. No indeed. You can't make me read your impressions.

Grinning. OK, I'll read what you have to say. That can't hurt, can it?

Come on Wayne, you know you want one. Seriously, it is hard to complain about the camera.

It's apparent that it was designed by a photographer. Form and function in a nice light weight package. If ever get tempted to go ULF, it will be the camera I will look at first (and last).

venchka
7-Jan-2009, 10:43
Come on Wayne, you know you want one. Seriously, it is hard to complain about the camera.

It's apparent that it was designed by a photographer. Form and function in a nice light weight package. If ever get tempted to go ULF, it will be the camera I will look at first (and last).

I know. I know that I know. The problem becomes: How many 35mm cameras and lenses am I willing to part with to fund such a venture. :D

In the meantime, I am going to explore enlarged 4x5 negative alternative process contact printing. Or is that tantamount to tilting at windmills?

Michael Carter
3-Feb-2009, 08:19
That sounds like what I'm up to. Digital enlarged negatives (4x5 or pinhole 8x10) printed on plastic and contact printed onto home made papers, tinted, toned etc.
My darkroom in under construction, 9 foot square. I have a 20x24 contact printing frame and will have to wait to see if I can actually use it.
Yea, I want a large as possible camera, too.

nelson_chan
3-Feb-2009, 09:21
i would love to hear how people are zeroing the back and front standards to be parallel with one another. i seem to always have trouble with this as there is no detents except the one dot for the front standard.

thanks in advanced.

venchka
3-Feb-2009, 09:37
i would love to hear how people are zeroing the back and front standards to be parallel with one another. i seem to always have trouble with this as there is no detents except the one dot for the front standard.

thanks in advanced.

Same here with my Vermont made Zone VI. Enquiring minds want to know.

evan clarke
3-Feb-2009, 10:00
i would love to hear how people are zeroing the back and front standards to be parallel with one another. i seem to always have trouble with this as there is no detents except the one dot for the front standard.

thanks in advanced.

Good, accurate levels in both directions and on both standards...Evan Clarke

John Bowen
3-Feb-2009, 10:24
Start with the Tripod level then.....

What Evan said

I carry a level in my camera bag to use on the front standard.

mandoman7
3-Feb-2009, 17:42
I carried a customized little hand level in my case for a long time, but felt vulnerable when I couldn't find it occasionally. After browsing in hardware stores for a while I found a small, cylindrical bubble level that I installed on top of the rear standard of my field camera, with reservations, as I was adding 3 small screw holes (!). It proved to be useful as I could actually level the rear standard in both directions while under the dark cloth. It was a little round thing about 1 1/2" in diameter. I really didn't like doing that to my camera but it works.


JY

Nathan Potter
3-Feb-2009, 18:21
Anyone carry a couple pieces of wood 1/4 X 1/4 inch in cross section cut to exactly the same length (say to +/- .001 inch accuracy)? Mine are 4 inches long and used to set the front and rear standards parallel in swing and tilt when I need that kind of accuracy. I use oak wood but metal will also do. They are used sort of like gauge blocks; if you get the picture.

Nate Potter, Austin TX.

Lachlan 717
3-Feb-2009, 19:31
Anyone carry a couple pieces of wood 1/4 X 1/4 inch in cross section cut to exactly the same length (say to +/- .001 inch accuracy)? Mine are 4 inches long and used to set the front and rear standards parallel in swing and tilt when I need that kind of accuracy. I use oak wood but metal will also do. They are used sort of like gauge blocks; if you get the picture.

Nate Potter, Austin TX.

Nate,

I do the same thing, but use two 3" Aluminium tubes instead of your oak ones.

Mind you, blocks might be a whole lot less fiddly than the tube as you should be able to rest them on the bed so that you have 2 hands free to adjust the standard(s)...

Bruce Barlow
4-Feb-2009, 07:04
I have a small 2-way bubble level that will mount on a hot shoe. I carry it in my small accessory bag tied to my apron. That's 'cuz Alice doesn't have any levels yet. She's still a prototype. But I love her anyway.

RichardRitter
4-Feb-2009, 07:07
A long time ago a master photographer I was studying with broke me of the habit of using levels and detentes. First thing I did to my Zone VI cameras both the 4 x 5 and the 8 x 10 was to file out the detentes.

I was out photographing with a grope of photographers and watched as one person set up their camera first they leveled the tripod then the head of the pan head then the base of the camera to the what was a level tripod head then the back of the camera each time readjusting the tripod head after everything was set up he picked the camera and moved from the back of the car to where he wanted to photograph , going somewhat through the same exercise of checking everything again. The image he wanted to photograph when he fist saw it was great the light was great. In the half hour it took him to go through setting up the camera the light when from great to ready bad.

Most of the time I am working with the camera back at a 5 to 10 degree back tilt sometimes more and some degree of tilt with the front.

venchka
4-Feb-2009, 07:42
Thank you Richard. I hope I see the light. I hope I become fast enough with my camera to capture it.

RichardRitter
4-Feb-2009, 08:24
Wayne pack your gear into the back of your car close the trunk. Open the trunk and set up the camera. Take it down and pack it back into the trunk. Repeat 20 times each time trying to do it faster. You should be able to do it at the end with out thinking about it. If you still have to think about it or still fumble with it do it another 20 times. In the book "Finely Focused" there is a very good exercise and more details on different ways of practicing setting up the camera and working with the lens. http://circleofthesunproductions.com/

venchka
4-Feb-2009, 08:35
Thanks Richard! I will do all of the above.

Daniel_Buck
4-Feb-2009, 09:43
In the half hour it took him to go through setting up the camera the light when from great to ready bad.

30 minutes? seriously? It doesn't take that long to level out everything :D

RichardRitter
4-Feb-2009, 10:18
30 minutes? seriously? It doesn't take that long to level out everything :D

Yes it was painful to watch.

Rakesh Malik
4-Feb-2009, 10:20
30 minutes? seriously? It doesn't take that long to level out everything :D

No kidding! It usually makes me 3-4 seconds to level my camera to my satisfaction, and I don't bother until I have my composition figured out -- and I only care if there's a horizon in the shot or some vertical elements that I feel need to stay vertical.

Of course, I don't bother leveling my tripod... just plunk it down where it needs to be, and start pulling the stuff I need out of my backpack :)

Daniel_Buck
4-Feb-2009, 11:02
Yes it was painful to watch.

I guess some people are more careful about getting perfectly level than others. After about 15-20 seconds, I'm done :D

Rakesh Malik
4-Feb-2009, 14:14
I guess some people are more careful about getting perfectly level than others. After about 15-20 seconds, I'm done :D

I wonder if maybe he thought that camera levels somehow knew whether or not the tripod was level ;)

Ron McElroy
4-Feb-2009, 20:11
A long time ago a master photographer I was studying with broke me of the habit of using levels and detentes. First thing I did to my Zone VI cameras both the 4 x 5 and the 8 x 10 was to file out the detentes.

Thanks Richard! I've always hated the front detent on my Zone VI. Its hard to get move the lens board when its close to that spot.

CG
9-Aug-2009, 14:45
... a grope of photographers ... How true.

ic-racer
9-Aug-2009, 17:46
I totally agree with Richard in terms of LF not really being a "slow" format. More often than not, things I find interesting are fleeting moments. The RR 8x10 is certainly on my 'dream camera' list.

fuegocito
10-Aug-2009, 09:46
After playing with Richard's 8x10 for the past few days, it indeed is a dream camera. Talk about speed in LF format, aside from its main attraction(lightweight) it can accommodate a lens being mounted on the camera while being folded, I don't think there are many, if any modern variation can do that. I love the fact the front standard fold into itself just like an old Deardorff and with its base and axial tilt, there are greater flexibility with short lens. The levels are a nice touch, now I can retire my key tag level from Autozone.

Several minor, very minor negatives, I hope this is allowed:) The plastic end caps for the tubes are not solidly set in place, one cap already went missing. Nothing to handicap any functions, it's more like a cosmetic issue. No hand strap, no problem either, just grab the base plate. Bale, I always find this type of bail to be cumbersome because of its taunt-ness, one need to hold down the camera while jam it in place. I found the Cambo thumb lever operated bail are much nicer but that is an entirely different beast. So most likely I will just take the bail off.

I am still playing with the rail system, it seems that it need to be a certain way before the camera can fold to its minimum size, and if this is the case, maybe some marking for that exact location might be come in handy for any first time handler. Again, not a deal breaker.

The last two issues are probably just personal ones, I wish the lens board is either a Sinar or Deardorff but since it came with a Linhof adapter, it'll do for now. Second is that the slightly larger dimension because of the front standard knobs made what was already tight fit with my Deardorff into my pack a jamming session now:) Again, no big deal, just new adaptation like everything else new in life.

Thank you Nelson, and Richard for your ingenuity and creativity.

Leonard Metcalf
15-Jan-2012, 23:11
There must be quiet a few of these beautiful cameras out there now. Does anyone else have any comments on what they are like to use? Would love to read some more user reviews.

Am seriously considering buying one. Anyone in Sydney have one that I could visit?

jeroldharter
16-Jan-2012, 06:37
I don't have one yet, but i would like to get one at some point so i have researched the camera.

If you haven't already, i suggest buying the DVD from his website illustrating the ULF cameras. The 8x10's are just smaller versions for the most part so you get a good look at setup and use. I particulalry like the asymmetric rear swing. I have that feature on my Wehman and i would not want to be without it on a future camera.

http://www.circleofthesunproductions.com/ULFOwnersManual.htm

John Bowen
16-Jan-2012, 17:20
Was out with mine yesterday. 6 degrees Fahrenheit, big gloves on and no problems operating my Ritter.

letchhausen
18-Jan-2012, 23:56
With Phillips and Wehman out what other lightweight choices are there? Chamonix? It's heavier than a Ritter but about the same as a Wehman.......has anyone compared the Chamonix to the Ritter? I'm asking because a few weeks ago I was about to pull the trigger on a Wehman. Then I found out that he quit so now I'm back in the research cycle for what my next choice would be now that the Wehman is out. The Ritter tube system looks...eclectic...but I like that weight. But the Chamonix looks sweet. But, but, but....

Leonard Metcalf
6-Mar-2012, 05:44
Ok.. So I have watched the DVD.. And am getting closer to buying one of these...

Yet I am still hoping to hear from some other users out there... Please throw in your two cents worth...

Erik Larsen
6-Mar-2012, 19:10
Ok.. So I have watched the DVD.. And am getting closer to buying one of these...

Yet I am still hoping to hear from some other users out there... Please throw in your two cents worth...

Hi Leonard,
I have used the Ritter 8x10 for a few hundred sheets of film so far. I am pleased with the camera, it is a backpackers dream imo - very light yet still retains it's rigidity. My longest and heaviest lens I have used
is a 24" RDA in a copal 3 and it handles it without problem. The shortest lens I have used is a 159mm Wollensak velostigmat that I had no problems with either. I am a happy customer but their are some nits I have as well with it.
The plastic ground glass isn't the brightest. I replaced it with a canham ground glass that is over a stop and 1/2 brighter. No big deal if you have fast lenses, but it was near impossible to focus the 159mm lens which is a f9 with the original gg.
The little plugs that go into the end of the tubes pop out if you look at them wrong, purely cosmetic but annoying none the less. On my camera the screws that hold the rear standard to the bracket on the tubes came loose and you have to poke
around with a tiny allen wrench through the cork to try and find the blind screw head to tighten up, no biggie, but a nuisance. The only real flaw I can find with camera is that the front standards axis tilt mechanism is near impossible to fully lock
down no matter how hard you try to tighten the knobs you can still tilt the lensboard unknowingly while cocking the shutter etc. I don't know if this is only my camera's problem or a design problem with all Ritters. Those are the only things that annoy me about the camera, and for the most part it is an excellent performer
and will probably be the last 8x10 camera I ever purchase because it just works great for my uses.
regards
Erik

Leonard Metcalf
6-Mar-2012, 22:27
Dear Eric,

Many thanks for your thoughts.

Regards,

Len

znwu
11-Mar-2012, 09:52
I am using a Ritter 11x14 camera and I love using it. It is light and suitable for field work. Recently, I am thinking about backpacking the camera to the places where car transportation is not possible. Therefore, a good backpack is necessary and I am thinking about getting a Kelty but don't know which one is appropriate. Will email them asking for information but would like to hear suggestions from other Ritter 11x14 users. Moreover, is there any idea to make the focusing glass brighter when focusing?

Thanks
p
znwu