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View Full Version : Linhof Technika 3000 with 75 vs. 72 mm lenses?



Henry Carter
26-Dec-2007, 13:41
I have been using the new Linhof MT 3000 with a 58 mm lens, and the built-in wide angle focusing device is a marvel to use. This is a wonderful instrument, and I applaud Linhof for yet again further refining the Technika.

According to the B&H website (which has a much more detailed description of the camera's features than does the Linhof site), the internal wide angle focusing device is designed for use with 38-72 mm lenses.

With a 75 mm Grandagon on a recessed board the spacing is not quite right, and I have to pull out the internal track a little more than I should in order to focus with the internal wide angle focusing device. This seems to work, but it is a compromise that the camera is not designed for.

Should I instead consider buying a 72 mm lens on the correctly spaced lensboard (1159) and use this focal length without compromise?

Bob Salomon
26-Dec-2007, 14:06
I am glad you found the B&H information useful. But it is incorrect. The internal focusing system is for lenses up to 65mm. The external focusing track is for lenses from 72mm up. The 72mm lens has to be mounted in the new 001015 lensboard with external scales and controls with the special adapter spacing ring for the 72mm.

The special adapter is Linhof #300171 and lists for $25.00.

The 72mm can be cam coupled to any Technika IV or later model and all use the same board and spacer to properly mount the lens on the camera.

Why are you trying to use the 75mm Grandagon on the inside track? It is properly positioned on the external track and also requires the 001015 board.

The 001159 lensboard is not for a 72 or 75mm lens it is the correct lensboard for the 65 Grandagon N, 58mm Super Angulon XL and the 55mm Apo Grandagon in Copal shutter on the 2000. For the 3000 the 001159 board is only used with the 55 Apo Grandagon.

Buying the correct boards should be the least expensive solution to your problems.

Henry Carter
26-Dec-2007, 19:41
Thanks Bob.

Why use the inside track with the 75 mm Grandagon? It is silky smooth for fine focusing, and it allows the camera bed to be dropped out of sight.

Just out of curiousity, where did B&H and Badger Graphics get the same detailed description of the features of the Technika 3000?

David A. Goldfarb
26-Dec-2007, 20:38
On my Tech V, I only have to drop the bed one click for verticals with my 75/4.5 Grandagon-N on the main rail. It's not that big a problem.

Bob Salomon
27-Dec-2007, 09:14
Thanks Bob.

Why use the inside track with the 75 mm Grandagon? It is silky smooth for fine focusing, and it allows the camera bed to be dropped out of sight.

Just out of curiousity, where did B&H and Badger Graphics get the same detailed description of the features of the Technika 3000?

They both apparently quoted the wrong information that they obtained from the wrong source. Since Badger is not one of our dealers and since they do not buy Linhof from the factory we could not guess who they quoted. B&H usually checks with us but not always.

Bob Salomon
27-Dec-2007, 09:22
Thanks Bob.

It is silky smooth for fine focusing, and it allows the camera bed to be dropped out of sight.

The bed is only in the picture when the back is vertical. When shooting horizontally the bed is never in the picture. To shoot vertically and not have the bed in the image (actually just the end of the bed) simply leave the back in the horizontal position and rotate the entire camera 90 degrees to the vertical. Just like taking a vertical with a 35mm (only bigger and heavier). The Anatomical Grip makes this very easy to do handheld. For tripod work you just need a tripod and head capable of supporting the camera offset 90 degrees. Linhof makes an Outrigger Adapter for their larger tripods to do this.

Henry Carter
28-Dec-2007, 07:25
Wouldn't using the inside track and dropping the bed be a more elegant and practical solution with a 72 mm lens? It does actually work this way with a 75 mm Grandagon if you pull out the inside track a little more than you should. I would not want to change the lensboard on the 75 mm because this lens is cammed for my Technika Classic.

"They both apparently quoted the wrong information that they obtained from the wrong source". Was the source not Linhof? Who else would have provided such a detailed description of the features of the camera? I find this somewhat confusing.

Bob Salomon
28-Dec-2007, 07:45
Wouldn't using the inside track and dropping the bed be a more elegant and practical solution with a 72 mm lens? It does actually work this way with a 75 mm Grandagon if you pull out the inside track a little more than you should. I would not want to change the lensboard on the 75 mm because this lens is cammed for my Technika Classic.

"They both apparently quoted the wrong information that they obtained from the wrong source". Was the source not Linhof? Who else would have provided such a detailed description of the features of the camera? I find this somewhat confusing.

The source could have been anywhere. It could be from information released when the prototype was first shown. In any case, where ever it came from it was wrong.

All you had to do was check with us. Since we are the distributor we are in constant contact with the factory and can always get information from management at the factories that we represent.

Dealers sometimes will check their catalog/web listings with us for accuracy. But not always. And as we have close to 1000 dealers we can't check all of there listings and don't spend time checking for their accuracy. We have our own job to do and that would be a full time job in itself. We also travel - a lot, over 100 nights in a Marriott alone this year - and may be away when a dealer has a deadline and they go ahead and print what ever they have. Sometimes one dealer may even copy another dealer's information.

In short, check with us if you are in the US. The phone call is free. If you are not in the USA check with your distributor in your country.

We have informed B&H that their listing is either wrong or worded so that you were misled. They will contact us to get it corrected shortly.

Henry Carter
28-Dec-2007, 09:11
Thanks Bob for offering to contact the Linhof factory on this point.

If my 75 mm Grandagon were not on a recessed lensboard, it would almost work perfectly with the inside track on the MT 3000. I assume that a 72 mm lens with the correctly spaced lensboard (and/or spacer?) would work, but I look forward to the final word from Munich.

Bob Salomon
28-Dec-2007, 09:32
Thanks Bob for offering to contact the Linhof factory on this point.

If my 75 mm Grandagon were not on a recessed lensboard, it would almost work perfectly with the inside track on the MT 3000. I assume that a 72 mm lens with the correctly spaced lensboard (and/or spacer?) would work, but I look forward to the final word from Munich.

The word from Munich is what I posted in my first response to you. The only recommended lensboard in the latest factory price list for the 72mm for the 3000 and the 2000 and the Classic is the current 001015 "Comfort" recessed lensboard with the 72mm special spacer ring.

The 001143 is the recommended Technika lensboard for the 23 and 45 Technikardan cameras.

For the 55mm Apo Grandagon only the 001159 board is recommended for the 3000.
For the 45mm Apo Grandagon only the 001045 board is recommended for the 3000.
For the 35mm Apo Grandagon only the 001015 board is recommended for the 3000.

For the 58mm Super Angulon XL only the 001149 board is recommended for the 3000.
For the 47mm Super Angulon XL only the 001147 board is recommended for the 3000.
For the 38mm Super Angulon XL only the 001138 board is recommended for the 3000.

The 35 to 58mm lensboard recommendations above are from the latest Linhof factory memo dated 12.07.2007.

Henry Carter
28-Dec-2007, 09:48
Thanks Bob, but you are telling me what can't be done, not what could be done.

According to the Linhof website, the wide-angle focusing track of the older MT 2000 can be used with 72 and 75 mm lenses: "extreme wide-angle lenses:35, 45, 47, 55, 58, 72, 75 mm for focusing with built-in wide-angle focusing track".

Why would Linhof not include at least the same functionality in the new MT 3000 as in the old MT 2000?

If the wide angle focusing track on the older MT 2000 can be used with 72 and 75 mm lenses, then surely the newer MT 3000 can do this as well?

Please ask Linhof if and how it can be done as I am sure that adjusting lensboard spacing is not difficult.

David Solow
23-Apr-2011, 04:27
I am considering buying a Linhof MT 3000. I like using my 75mm f/4.5 Grandagon MC lens. Am I to understand that you can use any lens with the back in the vertical position, except for 72mm or 75mm lenses? For those two lens sizes only, you must keep the back in the horizontal position and turn the camera 90 degrees? If this is the case, it seems odd that the camera should work differently for these two lens sizes only. It seems that turning the camera 90 degrees would affect the adjustments to the tilt, swing, rise and fall of the camera, especially in the extreme positions.

Secondly, what is the correct lens board for this camera?

David Solow
23-Apr-2011, 04:31
When I wrote,"any lens" in the above response, I meant any lens in the 38mm to 360mm range.

Bob Salomon
23-Apr-2011, 05:40
I am considering buying a Linhof MT 3000. I like using my 75mm f/4.5 Grandagon MC lens. Am I to understand that you can use any lens with the back in the vertical position, except for 72mm or 75mm lenses? For those two lens sizes only, you must keep the back in the horizontal position and turn the camera 90 degrees? If this is the case, it seems odd that the camera should work differently for these two lens sizes only. It seems that turning the camera 90 degrees would affect the adjustments to the tilt, swing, rise and fall of the camera, especially in the extreme positions.

Secondly, what is the correct lens board for this camera?

That is incorrect. The baseboard on the 3000 has an extra drop position to almost 90 so any wide angle lens, includng the 72 and 75 can be used with the back vertical and eliminate any change of the bed being in the picture. Owners of 2000 and Master cameras can usually have this feature added to their camera by Linhof Service.
The correct board depends on the lens. For the 72mm 75mm, 90 (except for the 4.5 one) and the 150 the correct lens board is the 001015 "Comfort" rececssed board. For the 72mm a special spacer ring is also required.

Instructions on using the 90 and 72 mm lenses on the 2000 qand the Master Classic are available for downloading on the current Linhof web site. Go to www.hpmarketingcorp.com click on linhof click on service and download the manual.

The instruction manual for the 3000 is at the same location.

Brian Ellis
23-Apr-2011, 09:01
With a Tech V and a Master Classic I used to just use a little front rise to keep the bed out of the picture with verticals. IIRC only about 4 or 5 mms of rise was necessary when using an 80mm SS XL lens and it seemed a lot easier to do that than to flip the camera 90 degrees. Can that no longer be done with the newer models (assuming, of course, that the amount of front rise needed doesn't ruin the image)?

Bob Salomon
23-Apr-2011, 10:02
With a Tech V and a Master Classic I used to just use a little front rise to keep the bed out of the picture with verticals. IIRC only about 4 or 5 mms of rise was necessary when using an 80mm SS XL lens and it seemed a lot easier to do that than to flip the camera 90 degrees. Can that no longer be done with the newer models (assuming, of course, that the amount of front rise needed doesn't ruin the image)?

The 3000 has an extra drop bed position to lower the bed to almost 90 degrees.

Brian Ellis
23-Apr-2011, 10:16
The 3000 has an extra drop bed position to lower the bed to almost 90 degrees.

I could also drop the bed with my Tech V and Master to keep the bed out of vertical photographs. But when that was done the front standard had to be tilted backwards until it was in the originally-desired position with respect to the film. Using front rise just seemed a lot easier than doing that (and also easier than flipping the entire camera 90 degrees).

Since I don't have a 2000 or 3000 and likely never will, this is just a curiosity question more than anything else.

Bob Salomon
23-Apr-2011, 11:34
I could also drop the bed with my Tech V and Master to keep the bed out of vertical photographs. But when that was done the front standard had to be tilted backwards until it was in the originally-desired position with respect to the film. Using front rise just seemed a lot easier than doing that (and also easier than flipping the entire camera 90 degrees).

Since I don't have a 2000 or 3000 and likely never will, this is just a curiosity question more than anything else.

The 3000 bed drops much further down then any other Technika. Your camera could drop the bed to 30 degrees. The 3000 can drop to about 90 degrees. On your cameras, with a 75 or wider lens, with the back vertical, the edge of the bed would be in the picture. With the 3000, even with a 35mm lens and the back vertical, the bed will not be in the picture.

That is why the instructions called for the back to be left in the horizontal position with a 75 or wider and to tip the camera over so the edge of the bed would not be in the picture.

David Solow
23-Apr-2011, 11:54
Thanks so much for you help.

A couple of other questions: Which lens board for the 90mm f/4.5 Grandagon MC, and which one for the 210mm f/5.6 Apo-Sironar-S?

David

Bob Salomon
23-Apr-2011, 13:57
Thanks so much for you help.

A couple of other questions: Which lens board for the 90mm f/4.5 Grandagon MC, and which one for the 210mm f/5.6 Apo-Sironar-S?

David

With or without the Cable Release QS system? Without it is 001026. With I have to check at the office.

David Solow
24-Apr-2011, 06:39
Thanks, Bob. Just to be clear, is the 001026 for both the 90 f/4.5 and the 210?

David

xiaubauu
21-Jun-2017, 20:30
I have been using the new Linhof MT 3000 with a 58 mm lens, and the built-in wide angle focusing device is a marvel to use. This is a wonderful instrument, and I applaud Linhof for yet again further refining the Technika.

According to the B&H website (which has a much more detailed description of the camera's features than does the Linhof site), the internal wide angle focusing device is designed for use with 38-72 mm lenses.

With a 75 mm Grandagon on a recessed board the spacing is not quite right, and I have to pull out the internal track a little more than I should in order to focus with the internal wide angle focusing device. This seems to work, but it is a compromise that the camera is not designed for.

Should I instead consider buying a 72 mm lens on the correctly spaced lensboard (1159) and use this focal length without compromise?

Hi, Henry,

I noticed that you said you have been using the 58mm on the 3000, I am wondering can you tell me what kind of lens board is required? Can I use a normal non-recess board or should I use a recessed one? if so, how much recess is required?

Thank you in advance...