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davethursfield
4-Dec-2007, 08:43
Hi, I've recently bought a 5x7 Stand camera. It has a Dallmeyer Rapid rectilinear lens as well as A Kodak Anastigmat lens on a board which seems to be a later edition dated 1913 with a ball bearing shutter. the plate on the back says "The Standard" Pearson and Denham Leeds. Does anyone know any thing about it.

Ernest Purdum
4-Dec-2007, 10:23
Pearson & Denham were a small firm which apparently started as a maker of metal parts for other people (including amateurs) to build into cameras. In about 1888 they started making cameras themselves and are believed to have kept it up until about 1910.

From what I can see of the camera, it appears to well warrant the name "Standard" by being fairly typical of British design of that time period. These cameras were the design ancestors of many Japanese cameras (Ikeda, Tachihara and many et ceteras) and the Deardorff.

I doubt that the camera is actually a 5" X 7". It is probably the slightly smaller 1/2-plate size.

The problem in using cameras of this sort, unless you have the original plateholders, is that they were not standardized and almost impossibleto match up. Fortunately, since the back is readily removable, it is a relatively simple task for a woodworker to adapt a back which will accept modern filmholders.

Vaughn
4-Dec-2007, 11:36
I notice you have at least one holder for it -- is it a plate holder or film holder? measuring it will tell you the size film it actually takes -- and you should be able to tell if it is designed for film or glass plates. I see similarly built holders on ebay occassionally, so you might be able to pick up more.

Have fun with it!

Vaughn

robert fallis
5-Dec-2007, 01:06
one way to use old formats, for which film is no longer made, is to use ortho film. and trim it under a red safe light to fit the holder.

bob

davethursfield
5-Dec-2007, 03:28
Thank you very much for your prompt replies. I am not sure now about which film to use or whether the camera takes glass plates. Here is a photo of one of the holders. I paid 180 for the camera with original case, dark cloth and four film holders, do you think was it a good buy or not?

Randy H
5-Dec-2007, 04:49
Thank you very much for your prompt replies. I am not sure now about which film to use or whether the camera takes glass plates. Here is a photo of one of the holders. I paid 180 for the camera with original case, dark cloth and four film holders, do you think was it a good buy or not?

If you like the camera, and you are pleased with amount paid for it, then it was an exceptional bargain.
Pretty cool looking setup, and with those lenses, etc, looks like she's ready to go dancin'

steve simmons
5-Dec-2007, 05:45
Measure the opening in the film holder. The size will tell you what the format is. Or, you can measure the gg.

Depending on your location in the UK you can take the camera to Mike Walker near Liverpool or Robert White in Poole and get some advice.


steve simmons
www.viewcamera.com

Sanjay Sen
5-Dec-2007, 09:06
That holder looks like a bookform plate holder, as can be seen on this page (http://plate-camera.livejournal.com/).

Ernest Purdum
5-Dec-2007, 10:31
I also think that it is a plate holder, but film can be used in them in metal "sheaths". If you have trouble finding these a sheet-metal worker can make them.

These are not the items designated as sheaths in the link that Sanjay Sen provided. They are metal sheets with three edges turned into "U" shape to hold the film. You slide a film in from the open end and then load it as you would a glass plate.

Pete Watkins
5-Dec-2007, 12:02
If it is half plate Mr. Cad claims to have a selection of film cut to this size. Retrophotographic also stocks it if they ever intend to answer their phone again. Nice people, bloody hard to get hold of!
Pete.