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View Full Version : eBAY SCAM!!! SCAM!!! SCAM!!! DAGOR 355mm MC GOLD DOT Schneider 14" W/ Compur #3



Caracalla
23-Aug-2007, 15:19
Good Day,

As you may know, I am looking for the same model of this lens, so as I was searching I found one today on eBay which appears to be exactly the same as the one recently sold for $2,600.

OK, I decided to analyze images scratches and believe it or not I did not need magnifying glass to realize that the seller was actually using the very same description with the very same images of the one recently sold for $2,600 to describe it.

To make tho long story short, I came back to the same link just to see what is happening with the sale and the Sale was deleted:eek: . I even entered the Item number: 160150307405, nothing I guess it was reported!!!

The problem is that the seller "jjk515" had a good feedback, so where is the logic?

Ah, from the beginning of sale he only left 15h or so until the end of the sale, not the usual so an so days etc.

So beware!!!!!!

The Link http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160150307405&fromMakeTrack=true


Regards

Brian Vuillemenot
23-Aug-2007, 15:28
Good Day,

The problem is that the seller "jjk515" had a good feedback, so where is the logic?




This is an ever more common way that crooks are using E-Bay to defraud people of their money. The "logic" is that they build up a profile of good feedback by auctioning off small items and/or staging phoney auctions to other E-Bay user names (many of which are all the same person). They then leave phoney feedback, giving the appearance of a legitimate seller, with all good feedback. Then, they list a number of big ticket items all at once, most of which are usually based on j-pegs taken from other, finished auctions (of course, they don't actually own any of these items). They take payment from the winning bidders, and then promptly cancel their E-Bay membership under that user ID and disappear with the winning bidders' money. E-Bay won't do a thing about it.

Keith Pitman
23-Aug-2007, 15:50
Another likely possibility is that someone has obtained jjk515's password and hijacked his user ID and listed a high dollar item under his ID --usually a complete copy of another recent listing from a legitimate seller. The hijacker includes instructions in the listing to email them at a given email address, not JJK515's address. I've reported numerous listings like this to Ebay and they have always been removed. Another buyer beware in today's hazardous on-line environment.

jetcode
23-Aug-2007, 16:14
This is an ever more common way that crooks are using E-Bay to defraud people of their money. The "logic" is that they build up a profile of good feedback by auctioning off small items and/or staging phoney auctions to other E-Bay user names (many of which are all the same person). They then leave phoney feedback, giving the appearance of a legitimate seller, with all good feedback. Then, they list a number of big ticket items all at once, most of which are usually based on j-pegs taken from other, finished auctions (of course, they don't actually own any of these items). They take payment from the winning bidders, and then promptly cancel their E-Bay membership under that user ID and disappear with the winning bidders' money. E-Bay won't do a thing about it.

it usually goes like this

trinket
trinket
trinket
trinket
trinket
trinket
trinket
trinket
trinket
jaguar
trinket

It's easy to detect, anyone who buys a cheap plastic trinket 10 times in a row and then sells a high end item is not to be trusted hands down.

Dan Fromm
23-Aug-2007, 16:31
Brian and jetcode, Keith has it right. Hijacking an account is a much better way to acquire a "good" history than selling and (ugh) actually delivering. The hijacked account is usually not very active but every once in a while a scamster nails an active seller.

If you think the camera listings are risky, take a look at the car listings. For a while there scamsters offered fictitious cars with listings were all html that buried eBay's own. Click on any part of the listing and pow! you were sending an e-mail to the scamster.

jetcode
23-Aug-2007, 16:39
Brian and jetcode, Keith has it right. Hijacking an account is a much better way to acquire a "good" history than selling and (ugh) actually delivering. The hijacked account is usually not very active but every once in a while a scamster nails an active seller.

If you think the camera listings are risky, take a look at the car listings. For a while there scamsters offered fictitious cars with listings were all html that buried eBay's own. Click on any part of the listing and pow! you were sending an e-mail to the scamster.

my sister bought a $35k mercedes no trouble on Ebay motors.

Keith Pitman
23-Aug-2007, 16:47
I was negotiating delivery of a $70,000 RV in Paris last Spring. He finally got the idea that I was jerking him around after about 20 emails back and forth.

Steve Goldstein
23-Aug-2007, 16:54
Yup, hijacked. For a while early this year there was a fellow in London who seemed to have an unending supply of "accounts". His listings always said something like "don't bid on this, here's my buy-now price and contact me by email", usually to a gibberish yahoo or hotmail account. They were also usually 1-day auctions, presumably so the scam would end before the real account owner knew what was happening, and there would be lots and lots of them. And although the scam price was always listed in pounds Sterling inside the auction, the (apparent) seller accounts were not in England.

It took me a while to figure out how they did it. Finally, one day I was browsing some listings and clicked a link inside one that suddenly gave me an eBay login page. But eBay had _never_ before asked me for a login just to look at an active listing! I checked the URL, sure enough it wasn't a legit ebay link. So that's how they get names and passwords, then it's a simple matter to find the ones with good feedback records.

Be careful out there!

Paul Fitzgerald
23-Aug-2007, 18:15
Hi All,

"Another likely possibility is that someone has obtained jjk515's password and hijacked his user ID and listed a high dollar item under his ID --usually a complete copy of another recent listing from a legitimate seller."

That would be hard to do if you use Ebay wisely. Someone tried that with my account and it was locked-down in approx. 12 seconds with a TKO lock-down. They had logged-in from a computer other than mine, from an email account other than mine, listing in a category I have never viewed. I don't sell motorcycle parts.

If you only login from 1 computer, ebay will recognise it instantly. It was a PITA to change ALL of my passwords but it made a point:

When was the last time you changed ALL of your passwords?

2,3,4, too long. It's time to change them again. Dial-up, DSL, ISP, email, ebay, paypal, ect. ALL of them and DON'T have your computer remember them for you.

Be careful out there!
Be careful out there!
Your mother was right,
Be careful out there!
It's your money. :eek:

Dan Fromm
24-Aug-2007, 02:50
my sister bought a $35k mercedes no trouble on Ebay motors.
That's nice. So what?

Not all listings on eBay are fraudulent. In fact, very few are.

Michael Graves
24-Aug-2007, 04:37
Another likely possibility is that someone has obtained jjk515's password and hijacked his user ID and listed a high dollar item under his ID --usually a complete copy of another recent listing from a legitimate seller. The hijacker includes instructions in the listing to email them at a given email address, not JJK515's address. I've reported numerous listings like this to Ebay and they have always been removed. Another buyer beware in today's hazardous on-line environment.

This is definitely possible. In the last year, I've discovered I was selling a Macintosh Powerbook, a vintage Jaguar XJ-S and a very high-end amplifier. Hell, if I owned any of those, there is no way they'd be for sale. Fortuately, I keep a very close eye on my eBay account and have caught all of them and worked with the bay to shut down the imposter. There are many ways to use eBay for crooked means. Just use due diligence and you will limit your exposure to these types.

Pat Hilander
24-Aug-2007, 07:21
I have also had my ebay account hi-jacked in the past and a bunch of phony 1 day auctions posted. I caught it early, but it still took a few days working with ebay to get me account straightened out.

pmazolo
24-Aug-2007, 23:19
Could someone experienced with ebay give a short descriptio of how to not be robbed as a buyer? Sellers reputation naturally, but perhaps you dont want to be limited to buying only from traders with 6000 good feedbacks....


Is ebay too risky to buy from a photographer listing his camera after having only sold say 0-5 items before? And, as a seller, I guess I cant sell my camera there if I havent sold lots of stuff before?

Is ebay only for traders, not average people buying and selling a few things?

As a seller, how can you be robbed? If I receive a paypal payment, am I not safe to send the item?

Rgds
PM

Mattg
25-Aug-2007, 00:08
Could someone experienced with ebay give a short descriptio of how to not be robbed as a buyer? Sellers reputation naturally, but perhaps you dont want to be limited to buying only from traders with 6000 good feedbacks....


Is ebay too risky to buy from a photographer listing his camera after having only sold say 0-5 items before? And, as a seller, I guess I cant sell my camera there if I havent sold lots of stuff before?

Is ebay only for traders, not average people buying and selling a few things?

As a seller, how can you be robbed? If I receive a paypal payment, am I not safe to send the item?

Rgds
PM


Ask specific questions about use of the item.

I never buy from people who are selling for a friend or dead relative and know nothing about the camera. It strikes me that at least some of these people must be fencing stolen property.

I'm sure you can be robbed as a seller and would love to know how so I can avoid it.