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christophe metairie
9-Mar-2007, 16:57
i'm finishing the building of the back and bellows , you can see pictures on my web site here : http://perso.orange.fr/christophe.metairie.photographie/ulf.html explanations are in french .. not the pictures :-)

christophe.

Kerry L. Thalmann
9-Mar-2007, 17:23
Christophe,

Congratulations on a job well done! The camera looks great. I find the fact that you used carbon fiber for the construction most interesting. I'm sure that helped save a lot of weight. Can you tell us how much your completed camera weighs? Also, since I don't read French, would you mind telling us where you sourced the carbon fiber materials and what it was like (what tools, any difficulties, etc.) to work with carbon fiber as a camera building material?

Thanks,
Kerry

christophe metairie
9-Mar-2007, 17:52
thank you kerry,
yes i used carbon fiber fot the construction, it's very easy to cut and glue with epoxy resin . i bought the carbon fiber in france here : http://www.structil.biz/ , all the tools i used is a metal saw , a power drill and sand paper ... i worked a few hours on it :-) but the camera will work ... i don't know the camera weight for the moment but i think it's under 12 kg . the most difficult to do was bellows and i had to do it 3 times ti build one good enough !! 12 hours of work on the last good bellows ( you see on the pictures ).
christophe metairie.

Ole Tjugen
10-Mar-2007, 04:36
Bonjour Christophe,

I assume that your experience with the Carbon Infinity helped you decide on the choise of materials? :)

8x20
10-Mar-2007, 06:49
Very good job Christophe,
you are right when you talk about the problems with the construction of the bellow.I havev tried to make one by myself for a 8x20 camera time ago but with diferent results(sigh!).
BTW I would ask you if you can post some pics of the final product I'm interested to see how you build the back holder .I'm on the process to build up the same monster on an old Toyo 45 camera view monorail.

About the bellow I couldn't make the perfect corners as yours.On the left pic I can't understand if you calculate the 45 degree angle on the largest pattern or on the smaller one (since this is not a square bellow there are 2 dieffernt patterns to consider ).
Thanks again for posting your wonderful camera.
Ciao

christophe metairie
10-Mar-2007, 07:25
hello Ole ... :-)

for 8*20 : i calculate all with a bellows calculator , see the jpeg and zip file ;-)
the angle is not 45 ....

christophe.

christophe metairie
10-Mar-2007, 09:00
i have know the weight of the complete camera ready to shoot : 10.4 kg ... not so heavy for this format no ? :-)

christophe metairie.

christophe metairie
10-Mar-2007, 09:21
i meant " i have now " :-) sorry for my english ...

David A. Goldfarb
10-Mar-2007, 09:30
Looks like a great adaptation.

I've read that carbon fiber produces a lot of splinters, so one needs to wear leather gloves and be particularly careful about cleanup with it.

So have you made any 16x20" Ilfochromes exposed in the camera yet? It would be interesting to see some examples.

Thierry Schreiner
10-Mar-2007, 09:32
Christophe,

A nice job. Congratulations.

I am actually working on a similar project, namely combining a 14x17 Lotus back with a Cambo Legend front.

My question to you. What material did you use for the bellows, and what is our supplier?

As I am living in France, too, I might use the same source.

Thank's a lot in advance and best regards

Thierry

Kerry L. Thalmann
10-Mar-2007, 10:20
Christophe,

Thanks for the link to the carbon fiber supplier. They have some very interesting materials on their web site. I have been using the t-slot aluminum extrusions from 80/20 Inc. (http://www.8020.net/) for my camera building projects, but would love to give carbon fiber a try. Do you need to treat the ends of the carbon fiber pieces after cutting to keep them from fraying or unraveling?

Kerry

christophe metairie
10-Mar-2007, 15:53
hello kerry,

for the end after cutting, it's ok with sand paper , it's really easy to do .

christophe metairie.

Brian C. Miller
10-Mar-2007, 16:22
Kerry, for a US plastics distributor, I recommend Tap Plastics (http://www.tapplastics.com). A Google search brings up Composite Resources (http://www.composite-resources.com/off-the-shelf/black-project/default.html) and Hobby Lobby (http://www.hobby-lobby.com/carbonfiber.htm) with carbon fiber stock. Just do a Google search for "carbon fiber rod stock" and you'll get some good results.

Brian C. Miller
10-Mar-2007, 16:23
Christophe: That is excellent!! Are you going to make your own film holders, too?

christophe metairie
10-Mar-2007, 17:28
thank you brian ,

i think i'm gonna order the olders from filmholder.com ,

be aware that you can find " decorative " carbon fiber with is not good for building a camera . to be strong carbon fiber must glued with epoxy resin and stay 4 or more hours at 100°C

christophe.

Ralph Barker
10-Mar-2007, 17:54
Very nicely done, Christophe. Congratulations on your success.

8x20
10-Mar-2007, 18:23
Christophe,

many many thanks for the pic of the bellow construction.When you will finish the camera please show us also how you will build up the back holder.
Thanks again for showing to the whole comunity your jewel.

christophe metairie
10-Mar-2007, 18:31
what do you mean exactely " back holder " ? i think this part is finished , there is no springs , but 4 screws , you only need 10 seconds to lock the back , and it's safer than springs . see the last picture on my site ( and play with the mouse on the picture ) http://perso.orange.fr/christophe.metairie.photographie/ulf.html

christophe metairie

Ken Lee
10-Mar-2007, 19:25
Let's see some photos made with the camera... when you have them ready.

8x20
10-Mar-2007, 23:51
Sorry . I didn't notice it.Great job .I suppose the GG is 2 mm thick.
Merci

GPS
11-Mar-2007, 03:27
Finally an example of a very good and intelligent camera project. The vinyl bellows is much heavier than one ordered from Camera Bellows though - personally I wouldn't save money on that but it's your choice, of course. A pleasure to see, indeed.

christophe metairie
11-Mar-2007, 03:52
the main problem now is to get film holders from filmholder.com ... they seem to be " overbooked " .. so now i wait the holders before i can take pictures .
i'll shoot mainly 16*20 cibachrome in camera ... i have a CAP40 processor for cibachrome :-)

christophe metairie.

GPS
11-Mar-2007, 05:16
Just curious -What do you intend to shoot with these long exposures on the Cibachrome?

Ole Tjugen
11-Mar-2007, 05:29
Instead of filmholders.com, you might check with Argentum Cameras (http://www.argentumcamera.com/_angol/html_pages/home.htm) in Hungary?

christophe metairie
11-Mar-2007, 11:14
i will shoot sea landscapes , like this one , you have a gallery on my web site if you want to se more ,

thank you ole, do you think argentum camera build also film holders ?

regards,

christophe metairie.

Ole Tjugen
11-Mar-2007, 11:41
Christophe,

I know they build film holders. They have to, since they also make many "odd" sizes of camera. If you look at the catalogue under "downloads", you'll see István Soltész (the owner) with a 40x40cm film holder.

christophe metairie
11-Mar-2007, 11:46
yes you're right ole , i'll send them a mail tonight ...

thank you,

christophe.

naturephoto1
11-Mar-2007, 11:53
Christophe,

Congrats on the beautiful new camera based on a Sinar P2. I hope it lives up to all expectations and produces your desired results. I look forward to seeing some results.

Rich

SAShruby
11-Mar-2007, 14:46
i will shoot sea landscapes , like this one , you have a gallery on my web site if you want to se more ,

thank you ole, do you think argentum camera build also film holders ?

regards,

christophe metairie.

Hi Christopher,

One of my projects I want to do is to shoot cibas directly too. What filters are you using? Are you using UV filter in combination for correction to tungsteen like 85B?

christophe metairie
11-Mar-2007, 14:50
sashruby, at the moment i didn't shoot anything ... no holders .. so ... i can't tell you anything

christophe.