PDA

View Full Version : Wet Plate Image Sharing, June 2020



paulbarden
31-May-2020, 22:06
Lets start a thread for sharing wet plate collodion photographs.

This is from a wet plate negative made with a Kodak Box Brownie #3B. I cut 1.3mm thin glass to fit the Brownie, and when using the smallest aperture on the little pull tab behind the lens, this simple meniscus performs surprisingly well! (Honest, I made this with a Brownie 3B!)
The exposure was 6 minutes in bright open shade, and even then, the negative needed a bit of help so I redeveloped it using the Iodine redeveloper process, which added about 1.5 stops more density. It will probably make a beautiful albumen or salt print!

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49958589656_cedf99dc88_b.jpg

Want to see more detail? Here is a larger version (https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49958589656_f9e9800ddf_3k.jpg).

Ari
31-May-2020, 22:12
Paul, it's a lovely photo, but what strikes me more about it is how clean your technique is.
It's also got quite a dynamic range of tones for a wet plate.
Superb start to this thread!

Jarvman
1-Jun-2020, 00:33
204361

Tin Can
1-Jun-2020, 03:09
Paul, no image file in post or link

Tin Can
1-Jun-2020, 03:11
This is visible, thanks for posting!


204361

paulbarden
1-Jun-2020, 06:45
Paul, no image file in post or link

Are you sure? It displays correctly for me. Ari can see it too.

Tin Can
1-Jun-2020, 06:52
Yep, just got this again

File not found.
410
Unknown:
JSON | PHP | MsgPack
{
"code": 410,
"message": "File not found."


Are you sure? It displays correctly for me. Ari can see it too.

Tin Can
1-Jun-2020, 07:03
That was on Win 10

I just tried on this iPhone with latest updates

No pics Paul

I see everything else but yours

Two23
1-Jun-2020, 07:15
Howard, SD

Belleview Lutheran Church (retired.)

Gundlach Korona 5x7, 1840s landscape lens FL=14 in.


Kent in SD

Tin Can
1-Jun-2020, 07:28
and I see Kent's just now

paulbarden
1-Jun-2020, 07:48
That was on Win 10

I just tried on this iPhone with latest updates

No pics Paul

I see everything else but yours

I've edited the post to remake the links. Let me know if it works now, please.

paulbarden
1-Jun-2020, 07:49
Howard, SD

Belleview Lutheran Church (retired.)

Gundlach Korona 5x7, 1840s landscape lens FL=14 in.


Kent in SD

Very nice, Kent. Is this a positive image? Maybe it would be useful to state in photo posts whether we are displaying positives, or scans of negatives.

paulbarden
1-Jun-2020, 07:50
204361

Thoughtful photo, sensitive lighting. Far better than the average tintype portrait!

Tin Can
1-Jun-2020, 08:01
Both now work fine on all 3 devices

Thank you!


I've edited the post to remake the links. Let me know if it works now, please.

Two23
1-Jun-2020, 08:37
Very nice, Kent. Is this a positive image? Maybe it would be useful to state in photo posts whether we are displaying positives, or scans of negatives.


Tin type.


Kent in SD

goamules
1-Jun-2020, 09:32
If I could get a plate that nice with a box brownie, I'd pack up and never shoot another! Great shot!

paulbarden
1-Jun-2020, 09:49
If I could get a plate that nice with a box brownie, I'd pack up and never shoot another! Great shot!

Thanks, Garrett!
Of course, the Box Brownie has some serious limitations (namely fixed focus), but if you know what is possible, it has a lot to offer! I feel compelled to make more negatives with it.

scheinfluger_77
1-Jun-2020, 09:56
I also see Paulís.

jon.oman
1-Jun-2020, 10:17
Lets start a thread for sharing wet plate collodion photographs.

This is from a wet plate negative made with a Kodak Box Brownie #3B. I cut 1.3mm thin glass to fit the Brownie, and when using the smallest aperture on the little pull tab behind the lens, this simple meniscus performs surprisingly well! (Honest, I made this with a Brownie 3B!)
The exposure was 6 minutes in bright open shade, and even then, the negative needed a bit of help so I redeveloped it using the Iodine redeveloper process, which added about 1.5 stops more density. It will probably make a beautiful albumen or salt print!

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49958589656_cedf99dc88_b.jpg

Want to see more detail? Here is a larger version (https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49958589656_f9e9800ddf_3k.jpg).

This is wonderful!

paulbarden
1-Jun-2020, 10:33
This is wonderful!

Thank you Jon, much appreciated.

Monty McCutchen
1-Jun-2020, 11:13
204382

Most of the work I have digitized is older work but I'll post here for posterity within the sub-forum. I hope those of you that have seen it don't find that too offensive. Great to see everyone's excellent work. This is a 20 x 24 Positive Alumitype (Maine Trophy) Dallmeyer 8D. If my memory is right (it isn't always unfortunately) this exposure was under north shade that was on an overcast day--30 plus seconds wide open. The backdrop is thrown over my truck and my son is pinned into the door handle for stability. I appreciate others skill at applying artificial light for their wet plate work. I prefer for my work a natural light aesthetic.

Monty

Two23
1-Jun-2020, 11:27
Impressive--20x24.


Kent in SD

Ari
1-Jun-2020, 12:35
Gorgeous, Monty. In any size.
I hope this means we get to see more of your work here.

Tin Can
1-Jun-2020, 12:57
Excellent Monty!

Merg Ross
1-Jun-2020, 13:03
204382

Most of the work I have digitized is older work but I'll post here for posterity within the sub-forum. I hope those of you that have seen it don't find that too offensive. Great to see everyone's excellent work. This is a 20 x 24 Positive Alumitype (Maine Trophy) Dallmeyer 8D. If my memory is right (it isn't always unfortunately) this exposure was under north shade that was on an overcast day--30 plus seconds wide open. The backdrop is thrown over my truck and my son is pinned into the door handle for stability. I appreciate others skill at applying artificial light for their wet plate work. I prefer for my work a natural light aesthetic.

Monty

That is really wonderful, Monty. Everything works, right down to the shoelaces.

And, congratulaions to your son for enduring the 30 seconds so well!

Best,
Merg

goamules
1-Jun-2020, 13:05
Here's one I took last winter.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/33955798718_a24cc9ab66_z.jpg

goamules
1-Jun-2020, 13:06
And one in 2012.

https://live.staticflickr.com/8022/7520848770_71e8a0d616_c.jpg

goamules
7-Jun-2020, 16:38
All this hoo-ha about wetplate made me have a hankering to shoot some. I haven't in probably close to a year, due to a variety of reasons in Tucson.

Setup:
So I got out an ancient batch of Old Workhorse, hmmm....pretty red, may still work. Do I have any raw collodion to "boost" it back to usability? Nope. Do I have any developer? Yep, as red as the collodion, but clear as Lousianne iced tea. That should work, it never goes bad. Hypo....where's my hypo? Hmmm....this crusty mason jar has hypo written on the rusty lid. Lots of floaties in there. It will work, but better make some more just in case it doesn't. Nothing worse than having an unfixed plate soaking in water as you realize you can't fix it. Oh! There's my sodium thiosulfate crystals....what was that formula again? 1500 grains to about 500ML....or was that 400ML? Where's my reloading scale? Plastic spoon, let's go about 8 teaspoons.....wait! That's not right, better go 10 teaspoons. Ok, got everything, got some trays, got my silver bath. Open my silver bottle, whew! That has some ether in it! Better get ready to sun it next time. I'll rinse out my dusty silver tank. Oh no! I forgot that even distilled water will cause a lot of black particles (organics) to come out, and need settling and filtering. Better pour all that out good. Take a chance - pour the silver bath into the tank.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49982395896_4a6894979c_z.jpg

Camera and Composition:
Man, it's hot today, need some north facing, open shade. Have to go to the front yard, the back has mesquite tree shade, but green will make a very difficult exposure. I want open sky, but not sun. Let's use the CC Harrison lens, from 1865, with his patented Iris. Wide open will be too fast and messy, even with this super old, slow collodion (probably over a year old). So I want to stop down. What to shoot? Darn, can't think of anything. Hate to waste a big plate on something stupid. Wait, I'll shoot me! My wife has been around, she can handle the lenscap. But she's timid to do what I do, determine the exposure as I walk to the camera, and count it off without using a watch. So she gets her timer going on her phone. "How long" she asks? Hmmmm....first I thought 8 seconds. I have an uncanny ability to guess an exposure very accurately. Keep in mind as collodion ages, it slows down. After a year, it can be quite slow. And this lens, who knows what the speed is? And the iris is just a slider, no real way of knowing. Do I measure and calculate it? Nope....just guess. I was about to back off to 6 secs, but thought to just go for my first inclination. "8 seconds, maybe a tad more". I used my cast iron head brace, put her in the chair, focused on her eyes, then told her I'd sit for the portrait.

First shot:
Development was by my usual timing, I could not see an image to adjust. That's expected, it's ancient collodion. Only when I get it out in the light can I see there's an image there at all. Start fixing, great! Spot on exposure. So 8 seconds was right. I look like a doofus. And there are oysters on the plate. It's going to be VERY touchy to clean them off, old collodion is very fragile. Yep, I'm tearing it even with a wet cotton ball just wisping it over the wet plate. Better stop. Let's move in closer and do another. Wow, even better exposure, lots of contrast. But I'm off center! Alway something....
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49982395836_60d8ba0e0c_z.jpg

My wife says, "aw, there was a reflection in your glasses." So the second shot I turned my head. Still there. It's the IR protection they put on the lenses, wetplate won't penetrate that. Hey, this is cool, I can see my wife in the reflection! Standing by the camera, holding the lens Cap.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49982651592_15364bf352_z.jpg

And that is how wetplate goes. And I love it.

Tin Can
7-Jun-2020, 17:19
Good stories are best quick
Thanks!

goamules
7-Jun-2020, 18:26
Here is my fav for the self portrait session. Southern mountain flintlock rifle, the type that my North Carolina ancestors made in the Blue Ridge.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49982250793_dbcfbaf0c7_c.jpg

Ari
7-Jun-2020, 20:04
Good stuff, Garrett.
Last plate is really nice, especially considering the ripeness of all your chemicals.
Good to know that they last that long.
Are you keeping anything in a separate fridge?

Two23
7-Jun-2020, 20:05
I was out again today and took a few 4x5 tins, outdoors. Temperature was 101 F with 30 mph wind. Developer was kept in a cooler, silver bath was in temperature 101 to (?)110 F. What caused the spots by the arrow? Have not seen this before but it happened several times today.


Kent in SD

goamules
8-Jun-2020, 11:40
Good stuff, Garrett.
Last plate is really nice, especially considering the ripeness of all your chemicals.
Good to know that they last that long.
Are you keeping anything in a separate fridge?

Yes, I keep the collodion, raw or mixed, and the dev in the fridge. Silver in a cabinet. By the way, keep collodion in glass, never plastic.

My session came out so well (and I'm pleased) because I knew how to react to several potential problems occuring. Like the "dark area" on the plates. My wife looked at the first one, and said "there is a shadow on the background cloth....see, it's dark there". I knew right away what it really was. Developer burning through. Tried to alter my pour.

Another thing was the margins were dark, all around the edge. Why? Because the collodion on the 2 edges was thinner than the other 2, and started drying out very quickly. Usually it won't do that, even in Arizona. But with super old collodion, it will be more likely to dry out faster, because the solvents have been added a few times to reduce thickening of the pour off bottle.

Black spots? Silver needs to be sunned and filtered.

The thing about wetplate is it's 50% technique. You HAVE to understand what you are doing.

Two23
8-Jun-2020, 13:51
What was I doing wrong in above photo?


Kent in SD

paulbarden
8-Jun-2020, 15:22
What was I doing wrong in above photo?


Kent in SD

I don't doubt that an ambient temperature of 100F will adversely affect the process, even if you have kept the developer at a more reasonable temperature. I've found that pouring collodion when temps exceed 85F becomes more and more difficult, and leads to poor plates with marks on them. I don't suppose you were keeping the collodion cooled as well? Quinn states in his books that the silver bath is inclined to misbehave at temps above 80F:

“The silver bath will work best at temperatures between 15C – 26C (60F – 80F). If the temperature of the silver is below or above these temperatures, you’re likely to experience problems.”

Excerpt From: Quinn Jacobson, M.F.A. “Chemical Pictures.” Quinn Jacobson, M.F.A., 2014. iBooks. https://books.apple.com/us/book/chemical-pictures/id794481149"

Two23
8-Jun-2020, 15:50
I don't doubt that an ambient temperature of 100F will adversely affect the process, even if you have kept the developer at a more reasonable temperature. I've found that pouring collodion when temps exceed 85F becomes more and more difficult, and leads to poor plates with marks on them. I don't suppose you were keeping the collodion cooled as well? Quinn states in his books that the silver bath is inclined to misbehave at temps above 80F:

“The silver bath will work best at temperatures between 15C – 26C (60F – 80F). If the temperature of the silver is below or above these temperatures, you’re likely to experience problems.”

Excerpt From: Quinn Jacobson, M.F.A. “Chemical Pictures.” Quinn Jacobson, M.F.A., 2014. iBooks. https://books.apple.com/us/book/chemical-pictures/id794481149"


Yeah, silver bath could have been near 100F degrees or even 110. The collodion was kept cooler but still could have reached 90 F by the time I was finishing. Looks like I need to start keeping the silver cool too. Lucky for me the temps are supposed to drop back down into the 70s and 80s after today. No doubt they'll be back up in July and August though. Just as I had figured out how to take photos when it was 15 F, it got hot a couple of months later. Those early frontier guys knew what they were doing! I can see how dry plates made things significantly easier.


Kent in SD

goamules
8-Jun-2020, 16:08
It could possibly be light leaks. Hard to tell from your scan. Keeping the chemicals around room temp is best, but mine have gotten pretty hot. Try it again, if still there with all the same factors, we'll figure it out. My hunch is it won't be repeatable.

Two23
21-Jun-2020, 10:36
I was out yesterday in the middle of South Dakota and photo'd some stored railroad equipment. Most of it is semi-abandoned. I liked the 1930s vintage snow plow. Chamonix 4x5, c.1890s B&L RR 150mm, tin type. f32 & 10s. Temperature was about 85 degrees and my development time was about 5-8s. I'm thinking of mixing up new developer adjusted for the warm temperatures.


Kent in SD

Two23
6-Jul-2020, 20:43
I got out last weekend and had plenty of time to try my new Anton 8x10 plate holder. I went up to a log cabin an hour north of me to test the holder and my latest lens--a rapid rectilinear FL=20 inch with a set of stops. The holder took a little getting used to as the back completely comes off and there's a trick to getting it back on in the semi-darkness. Other than that it worked flawlessly. With the Stenopeika I only made two successful 8x10 plates out of something like 40 tries. (The dark slide would scrape the emulsion most of the time.) With the new holder I made three successful plates out of three tries! My first try was pretty good, even. (Exposure a bit low.)

It was in the upper 80s to low 90s when I was making the tins, and that did affect my developer even though I kept it in a cooler with blue ice. I took shots on both Saturday and Sunday. On Sunday I couldn't pour a decent plate. The collodion kept gelling up shortly after hitting the plate. I realized I was near the bottom of the bottle. I've been simply pouring the excess collodion off the plate back into the bottle. Now that it's hot outside the ether quickly evaporates, along with some of the alcohol. There wasn't enough left in the bottle to keep the collodion fluid. I mixed up fresh collodion and poured in my stock bottle and this solved my solvent problem. The freshened batch worked fine.

Here's a couple of 8x10 tins I made. First used an 1854 pillbox lens FL=14 inch. Second shot was from the c.1880s rapid rectilinear FL=20 inch.



Kent in SD

Monty McCutchen
7-Jul-2020, 06:15
10 x 12 Alumitype. Love Wetplate for all its eccentricities. This was the first plate for me that showed how powerful the sensitivity of wet plate characteristics really are. My friend has no freckles visible to the naked eye but wet plate goes through to find them in subsequent layers of her skin. 10 x 12 Canham. 240 Heliar. Exposure 11 seconds. Natural light with a homemade tinfoil reflector with olive oil smeared on it to soften it a bit. Work with what you gots.

Monty

Tin Can
7-Jul-2020, 06:43
Like!



10 x 12 Alumitype. Love Wetplate for all its eccentricities. This was the first plate for me that showed how powerful the sensitivity of wet plate characteristics really are. My friend has no freckles visible to the naked eye but wet plate goes through to find them in subsequent layers of her skin. 10 x 12 Canham. 240 Heliar. Exposure 11 seconds. Natural light with a homemade tinfoil reflector with olive oil smeared on it to soften it a bit. Work with what you gots.

Monty

Two23
16-Jul-2020, 18:58
Wife & I went to Roosevelt NP last weekend. She hasn't been before and it's in an area with little virus activity. We were originally going to go out the west end of our state but that seems to be a real shit show for the past two months. I put a 5x7 back on my K2D so that way I could just use my 5x7 silver tank. It takes up a lot less room in the cooler. As it turned out temperatures were mostly in the upper 60s so I didn't need to worry about heat. I found an interesting formation in the north unit and set up, take a shot. My set up in the back of my car worked very well, and I was able to dial in exposure pretty well on the second shot. I did have a little trouble getting developer evenly on all the plate but otherwise it seemed to come out OK. However, I'm still plagued by blue areas around the edges. I've not been able to figure out what's causing this. I don't know if I'm not developing long enough or if my fixer is getting weak?


Kent in SD