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Ken Lee
6-Mar-2020, 16:23
Homage: something done or given in acknowledgment or consideration of the worth of another.

Perhaps you have made a photograph in the style or approach of another, either purposely or accidentally.

Perhaps your photograph evokes or emulates the feeling of another photographer's work.

Pieter
6-Mar-2020, 19:07
201515

paulbarden
6-Mar-2020, 20:18
In the style of Josef Sudek. Like it or lump it, I’m fine either way. :-)

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49594762001_cc43247210_b.jpg

h2oman
6-Mar-2020, 20:28
Homage to Frederick H. Evans:

201520

h2oman
6-Mar-2020, 20:30
And to William Clift:

201521

Ken Lee
7-Mar-2020, 07:19
http://www.kennethleegallery.com/images/forum/HomageToPS.jpg

Guess whose style this emulates :o

Oren Grad
7-Mar-2020, 09:10
Ken, this is a fun idea for a thread. Might make for some interesting and instructive discussion to not identify the inspiration, and let others say what influences they think they see and why. Not saying that should be a requirement, just that it might be interesting for anyone who is up for that sort of discussion to try it that way and see what happens.

Ken Lee
7-Mar-2020, 10:48
Ken, this is a fun idea for a thread. Might make for some interesting and instructive discussion to not identify the inspiration, and let others say what influences they think they see and why. Not saying that should be a requirement, just that it might be interesting for anyone who is up for that sort of discussion to try it that way and see what happens.

Excellent idea Oren !

I have removed the name of the photographer I emulated... if it's not too late :rolleyes:

Ken Lee
7-Mar-2020, 10:53
In the style of Josef Sudek.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49594762001_cc43247210_b.jpg

Lovely, and lovely on its own merits !

tgtaylor
7-Mar-2020, 12:31
Lovely, and lovely on its own merits !

Wrong! Josef Sudek never photographed dead leaves in a glass of stagnate, putrefied water. Most, if not all, of his portraits that I have seen are of vibrant floral arrangements in vessels of clear, clean water. In choosing such compositions Sudek celebrated life and did not subscribe to the politically correct “ain't life terrible” sentiment so prevalent today.

Misrepresentation is not "homage."

Thomas

Oren Grad
7-Mar-2020, 12:49
Wrong! Josef Sudek never photographed dead leaves in a glass of stagnate, putrefied water. Most, if not all, of his portraits that I have seen are of vibrant floral arrangements in vessels of clear, clean water.

There's no "wrong" here. It's not necessary for Paul's work to replicate every aspect of Sudek's work, or any particular aspect of Sudek's work, in order for Paul to feel that he has been influenced by Sudek, or for others to see echoes of Sudek in it.

Let's see if we can take this as an opportunity to think about influences and relationships that we may not have recognized before, rather than looking for reasons to dismiss others' perceptions out of hand.

Paul: it's beautiful, thanks for sharing and for giving us an interesting proposition to ponder.

Ken Lee
7-Mar-2020, 13:38
Homage to Frederick H. Evans:

201520

This is certainly reminiscent of the famous Evans photograph of the steps but with your own composition, lighting, atmosphere, etc.

Pretty hip actually ! Some people might feel intimidated to approach this subject.

Who wrote Variations on a Theme of Paganini: Brahms ?

Who wrote Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini: Rachmaninoff ?

Last time we spoke, Paganini told me he was flattered :cool:

Ken Lee
7-Mar-2020, 18:10
http://www.kennethleegallery.com/images/forum/HomageToAS.jpg

Perhaps this will be a little easier to identify.

robshepherd
7-Mar-2020, 18:32
Ken, your take on an "equivalent", perhaps? I like it.

sanking
7-Mar-2020, 18:47
There's no "wrong" here. It's not necessary for Paul's work to replicate every aspect of Sudek's work, or any particular aspect of Sudek's work, in order for Paul to feel that he has been influenced by Sudek, or for others to see echoes of Sudek in it.

Let's see if we can take this as an opportunity to think about influences and relationships that we may not have recognized before, rather than looking for reasons to dismiss others' perceptions out of hand.

Paul: it's beautiful, thanks for sharing and for giving us an interesting proposition to ponder.


If there is any wrong it is erroneous suppositions based on limitations of personal knowledge.

Sudek did indeed make quite a number of images of still life portraits of leaves in water, bread, flower in water, etc. looking through windows, often almost exactly as depicted in the image posted here by Paul.

See for example Plate #51, "Glass and Rose", a 27.3 by 20.6 cm carbro print, in the book Josef Sudek: Sixty Pigment Prints From the Artist's Estate, published 1998 in New York by Salander-O'Reilly Galleries.

And do a quick search for Sudek and Last Rose and you should see a print very similar to the one Paul posted.

Sandy

robshepherd
7-Mar-2020, 19:23
And do a quick search for Sudek and Last Rose and you should see a print very similar to the one Paul posted.

Sandy

Thanks for the idea. I looked at Last Rose, and then a bunch of others. I have not spent as much time as I should looking at Sudek's work! So many lovely and inspiring images. -Rob

tgtaylor
7-Mar-2020, 19:35
https://www.artsy.net/artwork/josef-sudek-glass-with-a-rose

Here's another version: https://www.artnet.com/auctions/artists/josef-sudek/rose-in-glass

Does that look like dead rose and leaves in stagnant water to you?

Thomas

C. D. Keth
7-Mar-2020, 19:36
I’m not sure I would call these photos an homage, exactly- they’re only done with a phone camera and my attention was really not on the photos themselves- but the spirit is there so I post.

I had the pleasure of spending the last week in Paris with my wife. Neither of us had been there before and as a way to loosely structure some exploring around the city, I found the locations of a few of Eugene Atget’s photos.

These two were particularly interesting to me. One because of similarity and one because of difference:https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200308/d4857726c12e090758eb3b1225c6ebc8.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200308/20e8ef3c5197ea5acd498984d33a6b3a.jpg


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h2oman
7-Mar-2020, 19:58
OK, take your guesses:

201540

tgtaylor
7-Mar-2020, 20:17
For the past week or so I have been searching through my collection of 6x7 slides for a certain image that I shot early one morning in Kern County. The image popped vividly in my mind during a time when I was reading-up on Watkins work in Kern County during the late 1880's. I haven't yet located that slide but a couple of days ago this slide made its appearance:


https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49628113961_941a3b49e9_z.jpg

Although in color tt immediately struck me as being a Watkins style photo. But when I took this I had never heard of Carleton Watkins much less had seen his photos of vineyards. So it can't be maintained that it was taken in homage to Watkins but rather that Watkins and I share to same “vision.” Vision is not homage.

Thomas

Hugo Zhang
7-Mar-2020, 20:27
http://www.kennethleegallery.com/images/forum/HomageToPS.jpg

Guess whose style this emulates :o

Paul Strand?

jmontague
7-Mar-2020, 20:35
Paul Strand?

Paul Revere?


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Vaughn
8-Mar-2020, 01:37
Mistaking the Map for the Territory, 16x20 silver gelatin print

Inspiration by an obvious Yosemite photographer...along with three 5x7 contact prints (the horizontal images) that sort of follow along the same lines.

Andrew Plume
8-Mar-2020, 04:55
Two from Paris - Notre dame, before and after

Much restoration work to be carried out

And thx for posting

Andrew

Ken Lee
8-Mar-2020, 06:56
Paul Strand?

Exactly !

5x7 cropped to 4x5 ratio, 300mm lens. The subject leans against an old wall with lots of texture.

It has taken many years to find a more personal vision. Even so, I still see things through his eyes.

Ken Lee
8-Mar-2020, 06:57
Paul Revere?

That's it ! :cool:

Ken Lee
8-Mar-2020, 06:58
OK, take your guesses:

201540

I'd have to guess one of the Westons.

Ken Lee
8-Mar-2020, 07:00
Ken, your take on an "equivalent", perhaps? I like it.

I set out to make photos of an Eclipse a few years ago and they all ended up looking like his "equivalents" in their overall tonality and mysterious mood.

But in this case, the photograph is simply an equivalent of... itself :rolleyes:

Ken Lee
8-Mar-2020, 07:12
Does that look like dead rose and leaves in stagnant water to you?

My apologies for not clearly spelling out the theme of this thread. We are merely sharing our own photos which to some degree are reminiscent of others that may have inspired us.

When I first started out with the view camera in the 70's I wanted to learn about filtering the sky. I made a photo of a propane tank with the Moon rising behind it. Later I referred to it in jest, as "Moonrise over Propane Tank", in homage to some of Ansel's iconic images. I'd show it here if I still had it.

C. D. Keth
8-Mar-2020, 07:16
I'd have to guess one of the Westons.

I’d say you’re right. Edward did a similar picture in the 30s, Brett did a whole portfolio of sand dune pictures frequently focusing on the textures created by wind, and I think Cole did a couple color pictures in that vein.


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Joe O'Hara
8-Mar-2020, 08:05
My humble tribute to Ken Lee.

201546

Joe O'Hara
8-Mar-2020, 08:06
I'm thinking you can guess who I had in mind when I made this one. I cheated a little by doing it in Photoshop, instead of the darkroom.

201547

Tin Can
8-Mar-2020, 08:09
A good sense of humor, I add!

I wish you had that shot...



My apologies for not clearly spelling out the theme of this thread. We are merely sharing our own photos which to some degree are reminiscent of others that may have inspired us.

When I first started out with the view camera in the 70's I wanted to learn about filtering the sky. I made a photo of a propane tank with the Moon rising behind it. Later I referred to it in jest, as "Moonrise over Propane Tank", in homage to some of Ansel's iconic images. I'd show it here if I still had it.

h2oman
8-Mar-2020, 09:13
Later I referred to it in jest, as "Moonrise over Propane Tank", in homage to some of Ansel's iconic images. I'd show it here if I still had it.

In that spirit, my image in post #4 is "A Lake of Steps" - Stairs to the Second Floor, University of Washington Library. :D

h2oman
8-Mar-2020, 09:14
My humble tribute to Ken Lee.

201546

About ten years ago I spent days photographing corn lilies, and got nothing as beautiful as this - well done, Joe!

h2oman
8-Mar-2020, 09:50
I'd have to guess one of the Westons.

Yes. Both of them, actually. I have the book Dune, featuring dune images by both of them. Only one image in that book is of similarly small scale - most are larger views and either more graphic (especially in Brett's case) or lyrical (both Brett and Edward). After seeing their work, and some wonderful dune images of Huntington Witherill's (his book Orchestrating Icons is one of my favorites), I'm not sure I'll be attempting to photograph dunes again!

I had hoped to do some larger views when that image was taken, but (minor) disaster struck. I was on my way home from my parents' house in Wyoming, driving west across central Oregon. I had always wanted to visit some dunes near a small unincorporated town called Christmas Valley. Driving west I could see the dunes off to the north a number of miles. Getting there involved leaving the highway and driving north about 8 miles, then backtracking eastward for another 10 miles or so, all in treeless high desert. After leaving the highway I passed a number of classic rural compounds consisting of trailers and RV's in various states of decay. The thought of approaching one for help in the case of an emergency was frightful.

I got to where the dunes were and started driving in on a dirt two-track road. I was in our Prius, with the back end full of junk I had brought from my parents' house. As I neared the dunes I rounded a corner and the Prius quit making forward progress. I was stuck, with both front wheels buried Prius deep - a few inches! I got out and made the posted image not far from the car. I wanted to do more, but was not able to focus on seeing, knowing that I was stranded. At that moment, true panic began setting in. It was about 9 AM and getting hotter by the minute. I changed into some cool clothes and stood in the shade of a large bush, drinking water and assessing the situation. I emptied the rear of the car to get access to the jack. It was a scissor jack, never used, well greased up from the factory. The moment I set it on the ground it was completely gummed up with sand. Scratch the jack plan.

I've been stuck in snow many times, and sometimes jamming sticks under the tires provided enough traction to move, so I thought I'd try that. There were a number of long, straight juniper roots that had been exposed in places by 4-wheelers driving over them. I was able to break off five or six foot lengths and shove them behind the front tires to back up. I figured I'd back until I was off the sticks, then replace them and do it over and over again. I got in and gently gave it a bit of gas, and was moving! I noticed that if I cut left I would get the car pointed down a slight incline, which seemed like a good thing. I did it, and found myself slightly downhill, as planned. I threw caution to the wind and started steadily and carefully driving forward, remembering a friend's mantra when rock climbing - "momentum is your only friend!" I drove to where the road became firmer and stopped, then walked back to retrieve a few things I'd left behind.

By then the sun was too high for any more photography. I started leaving, thinking about how fortunate I had been to get out of a seemingly serious predicament. At the edge of the dune area I stopped in the shade of a sign that listed courtesy protocols for those enjoying the area in off highway vehicles. I then realized that it was a Friday, and by evening the place would probably be crawling with camp trailers and large pickup trucks. It then struck me that probably the greatest danger I faced was having to wait around all day to be jokingly ridiculed about my Prius when someone generously pulled it out with their big truck! :cool:

Joe O'Hara
8-Mar-2020, 10:22
"... probably the greatest danger I faced was having to wait around all day to be jokingly ridiculed about my Prius..."

I agree, really close call there. I hope you learned your lesson that day--life isn't always so forgiving the second time.

DonJ
8-Mar-2020, 11:48
I'm thinking you can guess who I had in mind when I made this one. I cheated a little by doing it in Photoshop, instead of the darkroom.

201547

Uelsmann

Ken Lee
8-Mar-2020, 12:26
I'd like to point out one interesting thing about the portrait posted earlier: the use of front fall. The lens is at the subject's eye level but his head is at the top of the image, not the center.

This adjustment was quick and instinctual under the ground glass of a view camera but to get this effect otherwise, we would have to shoot with a wide angle lens and then crop heavily. I doubt I would have ever considered that.

... So I'm keeping that old camera for a while !

mitch.goddard
28-May-2020, 10:22
I didn't set out to do so when I captured this, but here's my accidental homage to Todd Hido

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/49941710901_2d67799629_b.jpg
Hasselblad 500C/M, Distagon 50mm, Fuji NPL 160 (expired 1998)

Tin Can
28-May-2020, 10:37
Patron Optique

https://live.staticflickr.com/4745/40511908272_20aef02d24_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/24HU7V7)Carmine (https://flic.kr/p/24HU7V7) by TIN CAN COLLEGE (https://www.flickr.com/photos/tincancollege/), on Flickr

drj52
28-May-2020, 11:36
"Obsidian" reminds me of some of Brett Weston's ice photos:

http://www.donjamesfineart.com/uploads/1/0/2/5/102577980/obsidian_orig.jpg

invisibleflash
29-May-2020, 09:21
Always had a thing for Weegee. (along with many other photogs that have inspired me over the years such a Cartier-Bresson, Penn, Araki).) But Weegee was one of my favs.

(See the DVD on the NY Photo League for lots of behind the scene info on Weegee. It is on Amazon.)

I had a nice audio recording for download at the Internet Archive of Weegee talking, but they deleted my account this week. 5-1/2 years work and 70,000 to 110,000 files gone. I didn't bother to keep copies of everything I put up there. Stupid me, I thought it was safe. Well, so much for cloud storage.

Weegee lived in much simpler times. He didn't have to worry about all that stuff in the film era

Chauncey Walden
1-Jun-2020, 10:42
Homage to Laura Gilpin in Yucatan. Taken with a 1930s Ikonta A, 6x4.5, on Verichrome Pan, uncoated Tessar.
204381

jmontague
1-Jun-2020, 13:59
My homage to Paul Caponigro:

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20200601/88a43b35fc8f8a75fcedbffb5477dfa5.jpg


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BruceO
21-Feb-2021, 15:35
Several years ago I took a photography class at the local University to get up to speed on Photoshop etc. On the first day of class the instructor was going over the parts of the camera and when she got to the pop up flash she admonished us, "Never EVER turn in an assignment using the on camera flash, it creates harsh shadows". Our second assignment was to use a long or short shutter speed to show the different effects. When I hung this on the wall, she burst out laughing and all the 20 something students were looking at each other trying to figure out what was so funny. My only regret is that I sold my Heilman Flash years ago so some kid could make a litesaber...


https://i.imgur.com/AWozwTb.jpg

Dugan
21-Feb-2021, 16:01
That is hilarious, Bruce!
Great concept and execution.

Ulophot
21-Feb-2021, 19:26
Love, it, Bruce.

tuco
22-Feb-2021, 14:40
... she admonished us, "Never EVER turn in an assignment using the on camera flash, it creates harsh shadows".



Most excellent.

Way back in school taking Basic Art 101 or something, the teacher would brow-beat student's work that had geometric shapes. When asked why, she responded, they are not interesting and too predicable bla, bla. When the teacher was asked what about all that work exhibited in the art department halls that have lots of geometric shapes, she responded, they know what they are doing.

Tin Can
5-May-2021, 05:39
I find it interesting that 'we' must now know every image ever made

What will do in the year 2525 (https://youtu.be/1FgSmdfRUus)

Merg Ross
5-May-2021, 07:51
https://i.imgur.com/sDCaN12.jpg

Guess who ?

Ruth Bernhard

cuypers1807
5-May-2021, 08:15
This one is probably obvious:
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/51158885262_a6123f282e.jpg

Iga
5-May-2021, 08:43
Correcto !


Ruth Bernhard

Tin Can
5-May-2021, 08:46
Hand in Hand

https://www.icp.org/browse/archive/objects/exhibition-poster-for-hand-in-hand


Ruth Bernhard

lenicolas
6-May-2021, 04:53
I find it interesting that 'we' must now know every image ever made

What will do in the year 2525 (https://youtu.be/1FgSmdfRUus)

I agree with Randy. The game of “guess who” isn’t that fun, and this thread would be more valuable if it allowed neophytes to get exposed to new names and new artists to discover. IMHO
Remember we’re all from different parts of the world, from different generations, and we came to photography at different times... one mans “mainstream famous influence” is another mans “artist from 70 years ago halfway around the world that I’ve never heard of”.