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View Full Version : KORONA 11x14 " ULF / Alan Brubaker refurbished



Farid
6-Aug-2019, 06:31
Since yesterday I am a proud owner of a KORONA 11x14 " ULF / Alan Brubaker Kamera in perfect condition .

As a newbie in the large format i need to get all the theory and practical use on my hands before starting anything i guess...

Is there anyone using wet plates in such a big size camera? any advise not to ruin the whole outfit with the chemicals in practical use?

thanks for your inputs

farid

William Whitaker
6-Aug-2019, 08:39
I have to say up front that I have never worked with collodion (but not for lack of desire).
Disclosures aside, my take on jumping into anything new is to take a conservative approach and try it first on a smaller and more economical scale. IOW, perhaps you should start with 4x5 to become familiar with the process and the rote procedures before tackling something the scale and expense of 11x14.

I'm kind of assuming that since you say you are new to LF, that you've never shot collodion before. Although I have never used collodion I would imagine that it would be a lot easier to learn to coat a 4x5 plate rather than just jumping into 11x14. And becoming familiar with the full process in the smaller format first has surely got to help you avoid errors in the larger format which could lead to damaging equipment, not to mention the cost outright.

I think when one can master the process in the smaller format enough to attain a reasonable batting average, then one can move confidently forward to doing the same in 11xx14.

That's just my 2 worth, most likely devalued by now. Good luck!

cuypers1807
6-Aug-2019, 08:56
I shoot 11x14 plates using a Chamonix holder. Silver nitrate can get everywhere. Wiping the back of the plates before putting them in the holder is key. Also not handling the camera with the wet gloves used to load the plate into the holder will greatly reduce the risks. If you haven't already shot plates before, starting by shooting small plates is advised. The bigger the plates the messier it gets and the knowledge gained from making smaller plates will keep your process clean when dealing with the larger plates.

Farid
6-Aug-2019, 10:40
becoming familiar with the full process in the smaller format first has surely got to help you avoid errors in the larger format which could lead to damaging equipment, not to mention the cost outright.

I think when one can master the process in the smaller format enough to attain a reasonable batting average




Thanks for your advise William!

For the moment i will get 50 Film sheets for free to start with. but for sure i guess. i will get maybe a lomo cam and test the chemicals on aluminium plates in small format. might be fun and the cam is cheap. just as an idea. but i guess i will end up on a 5x7" what ever the smaller sizes will be :) or so for the wet start into getting bigger.

I will also need to search for a wet plate frame...maybe built new i guess...

Farid
6-Aug-2019, 10:42
Silver nitrate can get everywhere. Wiping the back of the plates before putting them in the holder is key.

I can imagine the mess that can be created :)

For the moment i will get 50 Film sheets for free to start with. but for sure i guess. i will get maybe a lomo cam and test the chemicals on aluminium plates in small format. might be fun and the cam is cheap. just as an idea. but i guess i will end up on a 5x7" what ever the smaller sizes will be or so for the wet start into getting bigger.

I will also need to search for a wet plate frame...maybe built new i guess...

thanks for your help guys

Two23
6-Aug-2019, 12:55
I just bought a 5x7 plate holder from Chamonix. I really like it. As for collodion I'm starting with 4x5. I won't even consider moving to 5x7 until I get that down.


Kent in SD

Farid
6-Aug-2019, 13:23
Hi Kent,
I see... i will stick to film for the moment but keep in mind to get a small format one for the chemistry start :)

smiles

Farid
10-Aug-2019, 14:25
I will try to modificate a LOMO cam with small glass :) to get the chemical things working :)

angusparker
11-Aug-2019, 17:44
Suggest sticking to film for the moment and learning to use the camera controls. I love bringing out my 1895 era 11x14. With some simple modifications and new bellows it ends up being one of my favorite cameras. Vignetting (Lens and bellows in the way) and bellows exposure factors were the big learnings for me when compared to 8x10 and 4x5.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

angusparker
11-Aug-2019, 17:45
Where are you located? Maybe you are close to a member with ULF experience.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

William Whitaker
11-Aug-2019, 19:06
I seem to remember this camera from a long time ago, either Ebay or perhaps the LF Classifieds here. Thought it was neat how AB had taken some bar stock (effectively) and made a new machined track for the focus. It caught my imagination then because I had some Teflon bar stock kicking around, but, alas, not a milling machine.
Neat camera to be sure.

Oren Grad
11-Aug-2019, 20:12
I seem to remember this camera from a long time ago, either Ebay or perhaps the LF Classifieds here.

Yes, I owned it for a while, before the person who sold it to Farid.

William Whitaker
11-Aug-2019, 20:25
Aha!

Farid
13-Aug-2019, 01:49
Yes, I owned it for a while, before the person who sold it to Farid.

wow so cool to meet in here then. Its great to find out this thing has a bit of history and was not just used by one person... of course 100 years have some impact :)

Farid
13-Aug-2019, 02:01
Thought it was neat how AB had taken some bar stock (effectively) and made a new machined track for the focus. It caught my imagination then because I had some Teflon bar stock kicking around, but, alas, not a milling machine.
Neat camera to be sure.

The seller told me it got refurbished in the states, specially the bellow looks like new to me. also the rest forks fine. not to get too much friction on the teeth I will help it a bit to pull while extending it. i hope that will help a bit to keep in in that shape.

or is there a trick to keep the mechanism sliding better with any oils or similar ( i think best us is to keep it dry )

regards
farid

Nodda Duma
13-Aug-2019, 06:28
If you want to shoot plates without the inconcenience of the chemicals, try shooting dry plates. Very similar look.

Farid
14-Aug-2019, 05:47
If you want to shoot plates without the inconcenience of the chemicals.

sounds boring ;)

I definitely want to get wet :)

:)

Nodda Duma
14-Aug-2019, 07:27
Hehe nothing's boring about any of this stuff. :)

Have fun!

-Jason

basiltahan
31-Oct-2019, 05:59
Farid,

I'll have a bit of a different take on the size of a wetplate. I don't find large plate particularly more difficult than small plates. I shoot plates from 4x5 up to 11x14 on a very regular basis.

The best reason to start small is to get everything worked out chemically and logistically.

1) You need to get to the point where your silver bath, collodion recipe and developer recipe are making clean plates. Record everything you do carefully. There will be lots of tweeking.
2) You can put small plates into a big tank, but not visa versa (obviously). If you are committed, buy a tank that you can use for your 11x14 plates. The silver will be expensive, but if cared for, lasts for a very long time. Your tank will last for a long time, don't skimp. Get a good one from a reputable supplier. Leaky tanks suck and are expensive in loss of silver and dangerous.
3) Find someone who is willing to let you watch them make plates and ask questions. Pay them. It will be pay for itself in unwasted supplies.
4) Take a workshop. Firsthand knowledge and the ability to ask questions goes a long way. I teach people hot to make wetplates and keep in touch with all my students.
5) Pouring collodion and developer take practice, but get easier with every pour. Use drinkable yogurt, practice on clean glass. You can still eat the yogurt!
6) Be safe. Good ventilation is critical. Both for storage (never store collodion in the fridge or a tightly closed cabinet, ether fumes are explosive and need to be ventilated).
7) Making your own solutions from powdered chemistry should be done with protection (eyes, mouth, hands). Buy ready made solutions if you are not prepared to be working as a chemist should.
8) Ask questions here. The resources of this forum are extensive, and people here are so kind and helpful.

Good Luck and welcome to the ULF wetplate community!

Basil

Two23
31-Oct-2019, 07:52
I started in August. My first 40 plates were a learning experience and I'm just now getting consistent decent results. I started with 4x5 and now added 5x7. Looking at 8x10. It would have been very expensive to have started with something large and would have frustrated me. It's not like shooting film. Exposure and development are a guess and it takes many attempts to start getting results.


Kent in SD

Farid
1-Nov-2019, 10:39
Where are you located? Maybe you are close to a member with ULF experience

I made my LF wet plate workshop with some nice glass plates. in and outdoor images. The chemicals are soon complete i just need to cut the glass sheets and build a silver bath container... then i'm set and ready to rumble :) 4x5" and 13x18cm plate sizes so far... the 11x14" needs to wait a bit until i'm comfortable with the liquids :)

I am in zurich switzerland :)

:)

goamules
2-Nov-2019, 05:13
The fastest way to learn wetplate is under the instruction of an experienced person. I mean live, not on the internet. But it's not hard.

Cost is the biggest reason I would shoot wetplate over dry plates. I can shoot small plates for just a few cents, making everything myself. If I added up the cost of the hundreds of quarterplate through ULF photos I shot over the years, it was much cheaper doing collodion than buying film or dry plates. I can shoot any time, and when I run low on any of the 3 main liquid chemistry, I just mix some more and keep shooting.

Farid
3-Nov-2019, 02:34
Farid,

I'll have a bit of a different take on the size of a wetplate. I don't find large plate particularly more difficult than small plates. I shoot plates from 4x5 up to 11x14 on a very regular basis.

The best reason to start small is to get everything worked out chemically and logistically.

1) You need to get to the point where your silver bath, collodion recipe and developer recipe are making clean plates. Record everything you do carefully. There will be lots of tweeking.
2) You can put small plates into a big tank, but not visa versa (obviously). If you are committed, buy a tank that you can use for your 11x14 plates. The silver will be expensive, but if cared for, lasts for a very long time. Your tank will last for a long time, don't skimp. Get a good one from a reputable supplier. Leaky tanks suck and are expensive in loss of silver and dangerous.
3) Find someone who is willing to let you watch them make plates and ask questions. Pay them. It will be pay for itself in unwasted supplies.
4) Take a workshop. Firsthand knowledge and the ability to ask questions goes a long way. I teach people hot to make wetplates and keep in touch with all my students.
5) Pouring collodion and developer take practice, but get easier with every pour. Use drinkable yogurt, practice on clean glass. You can still eat the yogurt!
6) Be safe. Good ventilation is critical. Both for storage (never store collodion in the fridge or a tightly closed cabinet, ether fumes are explosive and need to be ventilated).
7) Making your own solutions from powdered chemistry should be done with protection (eyes, mouth, hands). Buy ready made solutions if you are not prepared to be working as a chemist should.
8) Ask questions here. The resources of this forum are extensive, and people here are so kind and helpful.



HI Basil, i missed your comment... thanks a lot for your help

meanwhile i 've done my Wet plate workshop and got some very nice first glass plates at home.

The chemicals are all here and also a magnetic stirrer, laboratory glasses density-meters only the pH meter is missing. but the rest is set. I've just made my own silver-nitrate bath container out of glass and will continue tomorrow getting the wood around it.
i am also restoring another wooden camera 13x18cm . the bellow is being fixed next :)

so i have at least two sizes of plates to start with .

smiles
farid

Farid
3-Nov-2019, 02:38
Garrett, thats whats good with the wet plate . i also got all salts and liquids here now and have my book recipies and cameras. glass stored in the basement ready to be cut in ans sizes... (collected from old picture frames people dont want anymore or big broken chunks of frames :) all 2mm .

but of course i will also need to contact the local glass manufacture company soon ...black glass would be the goal.

regards
farid